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Journal article

Income mobility among the elderly in Sweden during the 1990s

Authors:
ZAIDI Asghar, GUSTAFSSON Björn
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Social Welfare, 16(2), January 2007, pp.84-93.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Using a large panel dataset, this article investigates the degree of, and explanatory factors for, income mobility amongst the elderly in Sweden during the 1990s. It contributes to literature on welfare indicators for the older population as it supplements the welfare picture of the income adequacy with insights into income certainty during old age. The study uses the administrative register data for Sweden, which provides a reliable record of incomes for a large sample of the elderly. Results for Sweden-born and foreign-born elderly persons are analysed separately and compared with corresponding groups of people of working age. The majority of the results indicate that the income of the older population is more stable than that of the working age population, and upward income mobility is not as usual among the elderly as among other groups. The multivariate regression analyses identify several explanatory factors affecting those elderly who experienced income mobility. Most importantly, the death of a spouse increases the probability of downward income mobility, particularly amongst women. These and other findings of this research point to triggers of income poverty in old age that should be taken into account in policies concerned with the level and indexation of retirement income of future pensioners.

Journal article

A life course approach to understanding poverty among older American adults

Authors:
RANK Mark R., WILLIAMS James Herbert
Journal article citation:
Families in Society, 91(4), October 2010, pp.337-341.
Publisher:
The Alliance for Children and Families

A relatively new strategy for studying the prevalence of poverty in America is to analyse it as a potential life course event. In this study this approach is used in order to examine the likelihood of both income and asset poverty for individuals between the ages of 60 and 90. The estimates reported are based upon data taken from the biennial survey, the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). Estimates are made of the cumulative likelihood that Americans between the ages of 60 and 90 will experience at least 1 year of income poverty and also whether they possess a level of assets that would enable them to remain above the official poverty line for 3 months. The results show that nearly half of all elderly Americans will encounter at least 1 year of poverty or near poverty across these ages. In addition, 58% of those between the ages of 60 and 84 will at some point fail to have enough liquid assets to allow them to weather an unanticipated expense or downturn in income. The policy and practice implications of these findings are discussed.

Journal article

Determining semi-normative poverty lines using social survey debate

Author:
DEEMING Christopher
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 43(3), June 2009, pp.270-289.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Debates about how to set minimum income standards for health and general well-being are very current in Britain. Family budget standards remain popular but the results can be criticized for being little more than abstractions. They are to an extent 'artificial' and this raises questions about their 'real adequacy'. Another way to operationalize adequacy of income, in a lived sense, is to consider the household income levels at which a specified, desirable, healthy standard of living is in fact achieved, indicated here by diet and nutrition. Data are taken from the United Kingdom's Expenditure and Food Survey; the sample has been restricted to an older population, and three years of data (2002–5) provided a combined sample of 4,300 households. The study findings and semi-normative poverty lines are critically discussed in relation to the national UK policy context as well as the international research literature on poverty measurement.

Book

Well-being of older people in ageing societies

Author:
ZAIDI Asghar
Publisher:
Ashgate
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
318p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

Part 1 of this book sets the context with an introduction and chapters on conceptualising well-being of older people, methodological choices in measuring well-being and the British pension and social benefit system. Part 2 gives empirical findings on coupling of disadvantages - income deprivation and limiting health in old age, income mobility in old age, covariates of income mobility in old age, and a comparative investigation of income mobility of the elderly in Britain and the Netherlands. Part 3 has a single chapter consisting of a synthesising discussion and conclusions. Much information is given in figures and tables.

Book

Making your money work for your future: boosting income, cutting costs and dealing with crises

Author:
LEWIS Paul
Publisher:
Help the Aged
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
239p.
Place of publication:
London

It’s never too late to take charge of your finances - even if you’re in your 50s, and even if you’ve never got your head round them before. The older you are, the more important it is to start planning. And if you take action now, you’ll be well set up for the long life ahead of you.

Journal article

The socio-economic determinants of older people's health in Brazil: the importance of marital status and income

Authors:
BOS Antonio, BOS Angelo J.
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 27(3), May 2007, pp.385-405.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Studies in various countries have reported that older people who are married have better health than older widows. This paper reports a replication of these analyses with Brazilian data. The main objective was to explore the relationships between marital status, individual and household income, and the health of men and women using ordered logistic regression with self-assessed health as the dependent variable. The explanatory variables of interest were gender, marital status, and individual and family income. The data are from a survey of 7,920 non-institutionalised older people resident in the southern state of Rio Grande do Sul in 1995. The survey used a structured, multi-disciplinary questionnaire, which collected information on demographic attributes, household composition, social relations, occupation, income and health status. The results show that widows were 20 per cent more likely to report better health than married women. The women without individual income had worse health than those who did, even after controlling for family income. For men, there were no significant differences in health by marital status. The main recommendation is that the health status and economic circumstances of married elderly women should be given more attention in both research and policy, certainly in Brazil and probably in other Latin American countries. Programmes of income support to the poorest households should include specific transfers to these elderly women. Brazil's Family Health and Older People's Health public programmes should place more emphasis on the health of elderly home-makers.

Book

Your taxes and savings 2005-06: a guide for older people

Author:
LEWIS Paul
Publisher:
Age Concern
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
207p.
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
27th

Pensioners are losing many millions of pounds each year through saving badly and paying too much tax. The central theme of  the book is to help them make the most of their money. The section on tax explains how much tax you should pay, how to avoid paying too much this year  and how to claim it back from previous years with compensation or interest. It also warns about the most common hidden tax traps. The section on savings covers the wide variety of complicated savings products that are around  and what risks and returns older people should expect from each. It also explains how to save money in simple ways, how to avoid wasting money in savings accounts that pay nothing, and how to get the best interest, even on a current account. There is also advice on the Financial Services Authority, how to complain, and how to get compensation.

Book Full text available online for free

Attitudes to inheritance in Britain

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

With more families owning their own homes, more people will both bequeath and inherit assets. A key issue that this raises for social policy is whether people maintain their assets to leave as bequests (potentially raising the living standards of their children) or use them in later life to improve their own living standards. Almost half (46 per cent) of adults have inherited something. Most inheritances involve relatively small amounts; but 5 per cent of people have inherited £50,000 or more. Professional white owner-occupiers are most likely to receive an inheritance. The researchers conclude that inheritance plays an important part in many people’s lives but has not generally become entrenched as an expectation or duty. Most older people are willing to use their assets for themselves, rationally using some of their lifetime assets to meet needs in later life.

Journal article

A hostage to fortune

Author:
WRIGHT Owain
Journal article citation:
Care and Health Magazine, 15.02.05, 2005, p.32.
Publisher:
Care and Health

Reports on a recent venture between Age Concern and the Northern Rock building society to launch a lifetime mortgage to allow older people to release capital from their properties. Provides a critical view of the equity release product.

Journal article Full text available online for free

An end to the means?

Author:
YOUNG Andrew
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 13.1.05, 2005, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Pension credit has not been in operation for more than a year and it has helped many people over 60. However, there are sill aspects of the system that are unpopular. The recent interim report by the Pensions Commission puts the success of pension credit in a long-term perspective.

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