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Book Full text available online for free

Improving and understanding older persons' housing needs and services in Renfrewshire

Author:
SCOTTISH HOMES
Publisher:
Scottish Homes
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow
Journal article

Directing research: research on housing in the lives of older people

Author:
VALLEY Sarah
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 3(3), September 2000, pp.30-32.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article reviews the role of research in housing organisations, emphasising the need for research to be translated into practice, finding effective ways to promote it and facilitating future debate across the whole of the housing and care sector.

Book

London housing survey 1992: older people

Author:
LONDON RESEARCH CENTRE. Housing and Social Research Department
Publisher:
London Research Centre
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
12p.,tables.
Place of publication:
London

Details key findings from the survey as they relate to older people.

Book

Growing old together: elderly owner-occupiers and their housing

Author:
TAYLOR Hedley
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
114p., tables, bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London
Book Full text available online for free

Housing our ageing population: positive ideas. HAPPI 3: making retirement living a positive choice

Authors:
BEST Richard, ALL PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON HOUSING AND CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE
Publisher:
Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
7507
Place of publication:
Birmingham

Explores how older people can be given more control over the management and delivery of services and access to a wider range of housing choices. In particular, to ensure that they can: be as independent as they want to be; feel part of a community and choose how and when to they want to engage; stay connected with their social or other support networks, including through the use of technology, preventing isolation and loneliness; have a clear understanding of purchase, shared ownership or rental prices so that they can make informed decisions about what they can afford to buy and/or rent; and have greater clarity and certainty over service charges and associated property costs/management fees so that they retain more control and can plan their finances effectively. The report recognises that some of the factors that can impede older people 'rightsizing' - such as emotional ties to a home or community - are difficult to overcome. However, it says that measures to make moving easier, to build specialist 'care ready' housing where people want it and to address the sector's lingering negative image will encourage more people to move while still fit and healthy. Having taken evidence from a range of experts and stakeholders, the report also calls on local authorities to recognise the social and economic benefits of right-sizing in their local plans and planning policies. House builders and lenders, the report says, should do more to support people looking to move to more appropriate housing by developing clear and transparent information around fees and other costs that offer greater choice and control. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Retirement housing 2016

Authors:
GILMORE Grainne, et al
Publisher:
Knight Frank
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
6
Place of publication:
London

Examines the demand and supply for purpose-built housing for older people across the UK. It includes an analysis of the equity release potential of downsizing, as well as highlighting the planning landscape for the retirement housing sector. It is estimated that by 2039, one in 12 people will be aged 80 or over. The report reveals that just 3 per cent of new-build units in the pipeline or currently under construction are designated ‘elderly’ or ‘sheltered’ housing. It argues that supply of retirement housing needs to increase five-fold while downsizing to a home with one less bedroom will release around £52,000 in equity on average across England and Wales, with large regional variations. The report outlines the current demographic trends and the impact of an ageing population, the role of housing and the supply side of the housing market, and how the policy framework should address the lack of housing for older people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Exploring the age-friendliness of purpose-built retirement communities: evidence from England

Authors:
LIDDLE Jennifer, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 34(9), 2014, pp.1601-1629.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This article providing empirical evidence concerning the relative age-friendliness of purpose-built retirement communities. Adopting a new definition – ‘underpinned by a commitment to respect and social inclusion, an age-friendly community is engaged in a strategic and ongoing process to facilitate active ageing by optimising the community's physical and social environments and its supporting infrastructure’ – the article analyses the age-friendliness of one retirement community in England. The Longitudinal Study of Ageing in a Retirement Community (LARC) encompassed two waves of a survey with residents, interviews and focus groups with stakeholders involved in staffing, managing and designing the community, and other qualitative data collected from residents. Reviewing the different data sources, the article argues that purpose-built retirement communities have the potential to be age-friendly settings but might better involve residents in a regular cycle of planning, implementation, evaluation and continual improvement if they are to facilitate active ageing. In addition, more clarity is needed on how such developments can better fit with the age-friendly agenda, particularly in terms of their capacity to support ageing in place, the accessibility of the wider neighbourhood, opportunities for intergenerational interactions, and the training of staff to work with older people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Acceptance in the domestic environment: the experience of senior housing for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender seniors

Author:
SULLIVAN Kathleen M.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 57(2-4), 2014, pp.235-250.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The social environment impacts the ability of older adults to interact successfully with their community and age-in-place. This study asked, for the first time, residents of existing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) senior living communities to explain why they chose to live in those communities and what, if any, benefit the community afforded them. Focus groups were conducted at 3 retirement communities. Analysis found common categories across focus groups that explain the phenomenon of LGBT senior housing. Acceptance is paramount for LGBT seniors and social networks expanded, contrary to socioemotional selectivity theory. Providers are encouraged to develop safe spaces for LGBT seniors. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The top of the ladder

Author:
WOOD Claudia
Publisher:
DEMOS
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
95
Place of publication:
London

Many older people in the UK are at "the top of the ladder", living in houses that are too large or no longer suited to their needs. Enabling this group to move to smaller properties will free up family homes, and in turn free up smaller properties for first and second time buyers. One solution to the shortage of housing would be to enable older people to move out of large family homes into more suitable and smaller properties. However, there are currently very few specialist properties: only 2% of the UK housing stock (533,000 homes) meets the needs of older people, most of which is in the social rented sector. This report examines the wider benefits of building more homes suitable for older people, citing research by the Housing our Ageing Population: Panel for Innovation (HAPPI) on lifetime homes..It also examines the policy background and obstacles to supply and demand. It suggests tackling problems with planning, working in partnership at national and local level, and offerring practical help locally to enable older people to move. (Original abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Moving on: migration trends in later life

Authors:
PENNINGTON Jenny, INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC POLICY RESEARCH
Publisher:
Hanover
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
28
Place of publication:
Staines

To mark its 50th anniversary, Hanover has commissioned a series of 'think pieces' and new research from nine think tanks from across the political spectrum, that question assumptions and perceptions regarding housing policy and the ageing population. This paper from IPPR considers the reality, challenges and opportunities of mobility in later life. It explores migration trends of older people within England in the context of wider migration trends, using data to corroborate these trends, and the challenges that movement can present. It sets out the lessons that these insights give for policymakers, local areas and care providers, and the steps that should be taken in order to meet the needs of this large age group It finds that there is some truth in the stereotype that older people move to: areas where there is already a large proportion of older people, particularly coastal areas, and that they move from urban areas to small rural destinations. However, the data is also clear that movement patterns are more varied, suggesting that older people also move to areas without a history of older in-migration. (Original abstract)

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