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Journal article

Pioneer spirit

Author:
COHEN Phil
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 8.11.90, 1990, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Reports on a project in inner-city Amsterdam which has fought for home care of older people, rooted in the community.

Book

Report of research into domiciliary care services

Author:
WOLVERHAMPTON. Social Services Department
Publisher:
Wolverhampton. Social Services Department
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
57p., tables. illus.
Place of publication:
Wolverhampton

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Book

PSSRU Domiciliary Care Project: project summary

Authors:
BEBBINGTON Andrew, et al
Publisher:
University of Kent. Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
1985
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
Canterbury
Book Full text available online for free

Home care across Europe: current structure and future challenges

Editors:
GENET Nadine, ed.
Publisher:
World Health Organization
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
156p.
Place of publication:
Copenhagen

Currently, for every person over the age of 65 in the European Union, there are four people of working age. But by 2050 there will only be two. Demand for long-term care, of which home care forms a significant part, will inevitably increase in the decades to come. Despite the importance of the issue, however, up-to-date and comparative information on home care in Europe is lacking. This report attempts to fill some of that gap by examining current European policy on home care services and strategies. It examines a wide range of topics including the links between social services and health-care systems, the prevailing funding mechanisms, how service providers are paid, the impact of governmental regulation, and the complex roles played by informal caregivers. Drawing on a set of Europe-wide case studies, the report provides comparable descriptive information on many aspects of the organisation, financing and provision of home care across the continent. The report is designed to help frame the coming debate about how best to serve elderly citizens as European populations age.

Book Full text available online for free

St. Monica Trust: domiciliary care services report

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
Oxford Brookes University. Institute of Public Care
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
55p.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Demand for domiciliary based services for older people is growing in response to population demand and to policy demands for effective alternatives to residential and hospital based care. In addition, the client-provider relationship is changing, with local authorities and, to some extent, health authorities being removed from the contracting transaction, and more direct choice and control for service users. This report was prepared for St Monica Trust with the aim of: identifying the different forms of domiciliary service which can be provided, from home help to intensive rehabilitative services and end of life care; describing key approaches and business models, and consideration of their cost and business development implications; and identifying examples of existing services. The research comprised an analysis of existing published materials, and telephone conversations with a few existing services to explore the financial costing and employment issues. The report concludes by considering future marketing and business strategies, especially in relation to: local authority and GP consortia; personal budget and individual budget holders; and self-funders.

Journal article

Reminders that make sense: designing multisensory notifications for the home

Author:
MCGEE-LENNON Marilyn R.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Assistive Technologies, 6(2), 2012, pp.93-104.
Publisher:
Emerald

It is likely that technology will play a significant role in supporting people in their homes as they get older.  The purpose of this paper is to present a synthesised overview of a project which is developing multimodal configurable reminder systems for the home. The aim of the MultiMemoHome Project is to understand more fully the different multimodal solutions available and to understand how effective and appropriate these methods are with real users in the home context. The paper presents an overview of multimodal interaction techniques and how they can be used to deliver messages to the user in a way that is more appropriate to the user's needs, the devices available, and the physical and social environment that the person is in when they receive a message. The paper argues that electronic reminders or notifications delivered in the home (such as appointments or when to take medication to your phone, computer or TV) should be available in multiple sensory modalities (visual, auditory, tactile and olfactory) in order to increase their usability and acceptability and make them accessible to a wider range of users. A set of guidelines and lessons learned on how to design usable and acceptable multimodal reminder systems for the home are presented.

Journal article

Assessing the impact of a restorative home care service in New Zealand: a cluster randomised controlled trial

Authors:
KING Anna I. I., et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 20(4), July 2012, pp.365-374.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Restorative care, which focuses on helping clients do things for themselves, is one approach to improving home care services. This study investigated the impact of a restorative home care service for 186 community-dwelling older people who received assistance from a home care agency in New Zealand. A randomised controlled trial was undertaken, where older people were interviewed face-to-face at baseline, four and seven months. Ninety three participants received restorative home care and 93 people received usual home care. Findings revealed that compared with usual care, the intervention demonstrated a statistically significant benefit in health-related quality of life at 7 months for older people. There were no changes in other measurements for older people in either group over time. There was a significant difference in the number of older people in the intervention group identified for reduced hours (29%) compared with the control group (0%). The authors concluded that a restorative home care service may be of benefit to older people, and improve service efficacy.

Book Full text available online for free

The future of homecare: responding to older people's needs

Author:
BERNARD Caroline
Publisher:
Counsel and Care; Ceretas
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
19p.
Place of publication:
London

This discussion paper has been developed from Ceretas and Care and Council round table meeting held on 8 July 2009. The meeting was attended by 22 people from across the care sector, including sheltered housing and local authorities to discuss the state of home care in the wider context of community care. The paper beings by discussing the current state and quality of home care. It then discusses what a better system of care and support should look like to respond to older people's needs. Recommendations for the future are then summarised, which include listening to what older people say, undertaking a review of council homecare charging, and examine ways for home care to move seamlessly into residential care.

Journal article

The inter-relationship between formal and informal care: a study in France and Israel

Authors:
LITWIN Howard, ATTIAS-DONFUT Claudine
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 29(1), January 2009, pp.71-91.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This study examined whether formal care services delivered to frail older people's homes in France and Israel substitute for or complement informal support. The two countries have comparable family welfare systems but many historical, cultural and religious differences. Data for the respondents aged 75 or more years at the first wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) were analysed. Regressions were examined of three patterns of care from outside the household: informal support only, formal support only and both formal and informal care, with the predictor variables including whether informal help was provided by a family member living in the household. The results revealed that about one-half of the respondents received no help at all (France 51%, Israel 55%), about one-tenth received care from a household member (France 8%, Israel 10%), and one-third were helped by informal carers from outside the household (France 34%, Israel 33%). More French respondents (35%) received formal care services at home than Israelis (27%). Most predictors of the care patterns were similar in the two countries. The analysis showed that complementarity is a common outcome of the co-existence of formal and informal care, and that mixed provision occurs more frequently in situations of greater need. It is also shown that spouse care-givers had less formal home-care supports than either co-resident children or other family care-givers. Even so, spouses, children and other family care-givers all had considerable support from formal home-delivered care.

Journal article

Potentially inappropriate management of depressive symptoms among Ontario home care clients

Authors:
DALBY Dawn M., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 23(6), June 2008, pp.650-659.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The authors' objective was to examine the prevalence and correlates of potentially inappropriate pharmacotherapy (including potential under-treatment) for depression in adult home care clients by means of a cross-sectional study of clients receiving services from Community Care Access Centres in Ontario, 3,321 of whom were assessed with the Resident Assessment Instrument for Home Care (RAI-HC). A score of 3 or greater on the Depression Rating Scale, a validated scale embedded within the RAI-HC, indicates the presence of symptoms of depression. Medications listed on the RAI-HC were used to categorise treatment into two groups: potentially appropriate and potentially inappropriate antidepressant drug therapy. Adjusted logistic regression models were used to explore relevant predictors of potentially inappropriate pharmacotherapy. The results showed 414 (12.5%) had symptoms of depression and 17% received an appropriate antidepressant. Over half (64.5%) received potentially inappropriate pharmacotherapy (including potential under-treatment). At age 75 or older, higher levels of caregiver stress and the presence of greater comorbidity were associated with a higher risk of potentially inappropriate pharmacotherapy in multivariate analyses. Documentation of any psychiatric diagnosis on the RAI-HC and receiving more medications were significantly associated with a greater likelihood of appropriate drug treatment. It was concluded that most clients with significant depressive symptoms were not receiving appropriate pharmacotherapy. Having a documented diagnosis of a psychiatric condition on the RAI-HC predicted appropriate pharmacotherapy. By increasing recognition of psychiatric conditions, the use of standardised, comprehensive assessment instruments in home care may represent an opportunity to improve mental health care in these settings.

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