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Improving older people's oral health

Author:
ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS. Faculty of Dental Surgery
Publisher:
Royal College of Surgeons. Faculty of Dental Surgery
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

This report raises concerns about the significant impact that poor oral health is having on older people’s general health and quality of life. It makes a number of recommendations to improve oral healthcare for older people in England. They include: that key health and social care professionals should receive training in oral health; for regulators to make standards of oral care part of their assessments of hospitals and care homes; and for Government, health services, local authorities, care providers, regulators and the oral health profession to work together to improve access to dental services for older people. Although primarily applicable to England, a number of the recommendations also relevant for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Task-switching ability protects against the adverse effects of pain on health: a longitudinal study of older adults

Authors:
BOGGERO Ian A., EISENLOHR-MOUL Tory, SEGERSTROM Suzanne C.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Health Psychology, 21(2), 2016, pp.434-450.
Publisher:
British Psychological Society

Objective: Ageing is often accompanied by increases in pain, which may threaten physical health. Successfully managing increased pain requires the ability to switch attention away from the pain and towards adaptive health cognitions and behaviours. However, no study to date has tested how pain interacts with task-switching ability to predict future health in older adults. Additionally, no study has tested whether objective (i.e., task-switching performance) or subjective measures of cognitive ability have a stronger impact on future health. Design/Methods: The current study tested these interactions in community-dwelling older adults. Participants included 150 older adults who provided pain, task-switching ability, subjective cognitive functioning, and health data every 6 months for up to 5 years. Results: Multilevel modelling was used to analyse the data, yielding gammas (γ) analogous to unstandardized beta weights in regression. A significant interaction between task-switching and pain indicated that when task-switching ability was lower than usual, higher-than-usual pain predicted poorer health at the following wave. When task-switching ability was higher than usual, there was no effect of pain on health. No significant interaction was found for subjective cognitive functioning. Conclusions: Objective task-switching ability, but not subjective cognitive functioning, may have health-protective effects when older adults experience increases in pain. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Health capital in everyday life of the oldest old living in their own homes

Authors:
BERGLAND Astrid, SLETTEBO Ashild
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 35(10), 2015, pp.2156-2175.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

As more people experience old age as a time of growth and productivity, more research is needed that explores how they master everyday life. This paper reports on a qualitative study that explored how ten older women age 90 years or more experience and cope with the challenges of everyday life with a salutogenic perspective. The findings suggest that health resources such as positive expectation, reflection and adaptation, function and active contribution, relations and home, contribute to the health capital of women. These health resources were of importance for the women's experience of comprehensibility, manageability and meaningfulness in daily life. Health capital is a meaningful concept for understanding coping in everyday life by older people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Health beliefs of community dwelling older adults in the United Arab Emirates: a qualitative study

Author:
CAMPBELL Carol
Journal article citation:
Ageing International, 40(1), 2015, pp.13-28.
Publisher:
Springer
Place of publication:
New York

There is a paucity of information about the health beliefs that older adults in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) hold. This is a serious omission as understanding people’s ideas about health maintenance and disease prevention informs public health policy and practice. Using a qualitative methodology, twenty-three community dwelling adults aged between sixty and eighty years were interviewed. The data were analysed to uncover the meanings of health and health beliefs ascribed by the participants within their narratives. Participant narratives revealed representations of health that were in close alignment with previous research. ‘Health as value’ also emerged as a distinct health belief. Analysis of the interview data identified three superordinate themes labelled ‘Health is what you eat’; ‘Health was better in the past’; and ‘Health is from God’ as factors that participants attributed to their health. The implications for the health care system in the UAE are discussed. As the first study of its kind within the UAE, this study provides a solid base from which future studies exploring health beliefs and social representations of health can build upon. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Is the association between social capital and health robust across Nordic regions? Evidence from a cross-sectional study of older adults

Authors:
NYQVIST Fredrica, NYGARD Mikael
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Social Welfare, 22(2), 2013, pp.119-129.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The study examined the association between structural and cognitive social capital and self-rated health among 65- and 75-year-olds in Vsterbotten in Sweden and Österbotten and Pohjanmaa in Finland. Data were retrieved from a cross-sectional postal questionnaire survey conducted in 2005 and was answered by 3,370 persons, yielding a total response rate of 69 per cent. The association between self-rated health and interpersonal trust and membership in organisations was tested by logistic regression analysis. The results showed that older adults in Vsterbotten in Sweden experienced better self-rated health than in Finland. Furthermore, interpersonal trust and active membership in organisations were associated with self-rated health among 65- and 75-year olds even after having controlled for the influence of region. We therefore conclude that the association between social capital and self-rated health tends to be robust across contextually similar regions, but that further analyses are warranted in order to clarify the nature of this relationship. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Self-neglect and cognitive function among community-dwelling older persons

Authors:
DONG XinQi, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 25(8), August 2010, pp.798-806.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

While self-neglect with older people is a public health issue, it is unclear to what extent it is associated with cognitive function. As such, this study examined the cross-sectional association between self-neglect and cognitive function. The study identified 1,094 Chicago Health and Aging Project participants who had self-neglect reported to social services, which assessed the self-neglect severity. Cognitive function was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (Perceptual Speed), and both immediate and delayed recall of the East Boston Memory Test (Episodic Memory). An index of global cognitive function scores was derived by averaging z-scores of all tests. Findings indicated that self-neglect was associated with poorer cognitive function. After adjusting for confounders, self-neglect was associated with lower global cognitive function, and perceptual speed. In addition, higher self-neglect severity scores were associated with lower global cognitive function. Greater self-neglect severity was not correlated with worse performance on MMSE, but was correlated with worse performance on both episodic memory, and perceptual speed. While self-neglect was associated with lower cognitive function, episodic memory and perceptual speed, future research is needed to examine the temporality of these associations.

Journal article

The relationship between longevity and healthy life expectancy

Authors:
ROBINE Jean-Marie, SAITO Yasuhiko, JAGGER Carol
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing, 10(2), June 2009, pp.5-14.
Publisher:
Pier Professional
Place of publication:
Brighton

The authors discuss the relationship between longevity and health at an individual, national and global level. The authors draw on evidence to discuss whether centenarians are healthy people; whether nationally, the increase in healthy life expectancy is slower or faster than the increase in total life expectancy; and globally, whether countries with the highest life expectancies also have the highest healthy life expectancies.

Book

The carer's cosmetic handbook: simple health and beauty tips for older persons

Author:
TAY Sharon
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
159p.
Place of publication:
London

This practical handbook is designed to assist carers in looking after their clients' appearances as well as their health, covering cosmetics, nails, herbal remedies and essential oils, hair removal methods for women, nutrition and health, the skin and skin care and makeup.

Journal article

An empirical typology of lifetime and current gambling behaviors: association with health status of older adults

Authors:
HONG Song-Lee, SACCO Paul, CUNNINGHAM-WILLIAMS Renee M.
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 13(2), March 2009, pp.265-273.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Despite the low prevalence of gambling problems, older adults experience poorer health status given certain vulnerabilities associated with aging. This study aimed to classify lifetime (LPG) and current (CPG) problem gambling patterns, identify determinants of gambling patterns, and examine their association with current health status. Using older adult gamblers (n = 489) in the Gambling Impact and Behavior Study, Latent Class Analysis classified LPG and CPG subgroups based on 10 DSM-IV criteria: preoccupation, tolerance, withdrawal, loss of control, escape, chasing losses, lying, illegal acts, relationship impairment and financial bailout. A two-class solution was the best fitting for LPG and CPG groups. Except for illegal acts, the remaining criteria endorsed the distinguishing patterns. It was observed that 10.8% LPGs, 8.4% CPGs and 2.2% with both. Participation in religious services was protective of both groups. Gambling for excitement and to win money were related to CPG. Further, CPG was significantly related to worse self-rated health. Although problem gambling is strongly characterized by number and type of diagnostic criteria, findings support a focus to include targeted assessment of additional clinically meaningful gambling correlates. Research on the moderator of participation in faith-based communities on problem gambling is also warranted.

Book

Well-being of older people in ageing societies

Author:
ZAIDI Asghar
Publisher:
Ashgate
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
318p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

Part 1 of this book sets the context with an introduction and chapters on conceptualising well-being of older people, methodological choices in measuring well-being and the British pension and social benefit system. Part 2 gives empirical findings on coupling of disadvantages - income deprivation and limiting health in old age, income mobility in old age, covariates of income mobility in old age, and a comparative investigation of income mobility of the elderly in Britain and the Netherlands. Part 3 has a single chapter consisting of a synthesising discussion and conclusions. Much information is given in figures and tables.

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