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Journal article

Reclaiming social work with adults

Author:
JONES Ray
Journal article citation:
Professional Social Work, May 2017, pp.17-18.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

The author looks at the role of adult social work and the increasing contribution it can make at a time of an ageing population.

Journal article

Hoarding severity predicts functional disability in late-life hoarding disorder patients

Authors:
AYERS Catherine R., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 29(7), 2014, pp.741-746.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objective: Late-life hoarding is a serious psychiatric condition with significant implications in health and functioning. Geriatric hoarding patients show greater impairment in activities of daily living and have a greater number of medical conditions compared with same-aged nonhoarders. This study examined the relationship between geriatric hoarding severity and functional disability severity. Methods: Sixty-five subjects age 60 or older with hoarding disorder (HD) participated in the current study. Participants were assessed with measures of hoarding severity, psychiatric symptoms, and general disability. Hierarchical regression was used to test the unique association of hoarding symptoms with functional disability beyond the effects of demographic factors, anxiety, and depression. Results: When controlling for demographics (age and gender) and psychiatric symptoms (anxiety and depression), hoarding severity predicts functional disability severity. Analyses also show that clinician-administered measures of hoarding are stronger predictors of disability than patient self-report measures. Conclusions: When treating older adults with HD, clinicians must consider symptom impact on daily life. A multidisciplinary team must be utilized to address the wide-ranging consequences of hoarding symptoms. Future work should examine how psychiatric treatment of HD affects functional disability (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Transitions to part-time work at older ages: the case of people with disabilities in Europe

Author:
PAGÁN Ricardo
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 27(1), 2012, pp.95-115.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

This article examines the labour-force transitions of older workers with disabilities in general, particularly workers’ transitions to and from part-time employment within a European context. Using the 2004 and 2007 waves of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe, the article compares transitions between employment statuses for disabled and non-disabled individuals, even after controlling for different disability trajectories. In addition, it examines the determinants for remaining in part-time work in 2007 for those individuals who were part-timers in 2004. Findings indicated that older people with long-term disabilities had a higher probability of staying in a part-time job than their compared counterparts. The authors concluded that policy-makers must promote part-time employment as a means of increasing employment opportunities for older workers with disabilities and support gradual retirement opportunities with flexible working hours.

Book Full text available online for free

A fair budget: a discussion paper exploring the role of the RAS in the development of self-directed support

Authors:
DUFFY Simon, ETHERINGTON Keith
Publisher:
Centre for Welfare Reform
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
23p.
Place of publication:
Sheffield

This discussion paper describes a way forward for developing Resource Allocation Systems (RAS) in Scotland as an essential component of a sustainable system of self-directed support. It argues that, rather than fixate on one model or system, it is better to begin a period of genuine innovation and exploration in partnership with disabled people and families. The report suggests that the English experience of providing personal budgets provides some important Lessons for Scotland, but that there is also a danger of creating an unduly bureaucratic system that does not trust disabled people or professionals. The report offers seven principles to describe how an effective RAS should work, and an empirical process to measure the success of emerging models.

Book Full text available online for free

Research and development work relating to assistive technology 2011-12: presented to Parliament pursuant to section 22 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
138p.
Place of publication:
London

Section 22 of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970 requires a report to be laid before Parliament each year describing the research activity the government has funded to improve equipment for disabled and older people. This annual report describes the wide range of government funded projects supporting the development, introduction and evaluation of assistive technology that might increase the range of activities and independence or well-being of disabled and older people. The report aims to reflect research and development activity in relation to a wide range of impairments and health conditions and also to reflect the range of government funding programmes across health, social care, education, housing and employment. All the research into assistive technology included in the report is being funded by the UK government or by the European Union with participation from a UK organisation. During the period April 2011-March 2012, the Foundation for Assistive Technology (FAST) recorded 228 projects carrying out research and development activity in assistive technology, of which 82 concluded during the year. A complete listing of assistive technology research and development activity is included as an annex.

Journal article

Attendance Allowance and Disability Living Allowance claimants in the older population: is there a difference in their economic circumstances?

Authors:
HANCOCK Ruth, MORCIANO Marcello, PUDNEY Stephen
Journal article citation:
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, 20(2), June 2012, pp.191-206.
Publisher:
Policy Press

In the United Kingdom, there are two alternative social security benefits for older people with disabilities. The UK Disability Living Allowance (DLA) is a non-means-tested cash benefit claimable only before age 65, although receipt can continue beyond 65. The similar Attendance Allowance (AA) can be claimed only from age 65 and in some cases is worth less than DLA. DLA is being replaced by Personal Independence Payment (PIP) which, like DLA, will have advantages over AA. These advantages are sometimes justified on grounds that DLA recipients have longer histories of disability and consequently lower incomes. In this study, data were drawn from the UK Family Resource Survey, and included 32,384 people aged 65 and over, and 93,260 aged 30 to 64. The authors concluded that any reform of the disability benefit system for older people which is less favourable towards people who are first entitled to a disability benefit after reaching 65 is not based on evidence.

Book Full text available online for free

Disability benefits for older people: how does the UK attendance allowance system really work?

Author:
PUDNEY Steve
Publisher:
University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
32p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Colchester

Attendance Allowance is a system of cash benefits available, in principle, to everyone over the age of 65 with substantial care needs arising from physical or mental impairment. Recommendations for the diversion of resources from cash benefits have been made in the Wanless report and the government Green Paper on social care. This report argues that, before a decision can be made on the future of Attendance Allowance, it is important to understand how the system works in terms of its actual delivery of benefit to people, rather than its stated rules and aims. This report uses data from the UK Family Resources Survey for the 3 years 2002/3 – 2004/5 to analyse data on the relationship between disability and receipt of the Attendance Allowance disability benefit by older people. Despite being non-means-tested, the findings show that Attendance Allowance is implicitly income-targeted and strongly targeted on those with care needs. The analysis focuses particularly on the receipt of higher-rate benefit, intended for those in need of day-and-night care. Although the rules would suggest that the odds of receiving higher-rate payment would depend only on the extent of care needs, the findings showed that, in practice, higher-rate payments are significantly negatively related to age and income. The allocation of higher-rate Attendance Allowance awards also strongly favours people with physical rather than cognitive disabilities.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

FAST Research

Publisher:
FAST (Foundation for Assistive Technology )

The research section of the FAST (Foundation for Assistive Technology) website includes databases of research projects and publications, R&D News, annual reports, information on funding opportunites, details of the Technology for All programme and guidelines on research terminology.

Journal article

Care research and disability studies: nothing in common?

Author:
KROGER Teppo
Journal article citation:
Critical Social Policy, 29(3), August 2009, pp.398-420.
Publisher:
Sage

Disability researchers have voiced the criticism that the concept of care, together with research based on it, consists of the view that disabled people are dependent non-autonomous second-class citizens. The perspectives of disability studies and care research certainly are different from each other. Disability studies analyse the oppression and exclusion of disabled people and emphasize that disabled people need human rights and control over their own lives. Care research focuses rather on care relationships, informal and formal care, care-giving work and `an ethics of care'. Nevertheless, it is suggested here that the two perspectives are not mutually exclusive and that the two groups could learn from each other's approaches. For example, the relationship between disabled people and their personal assistants has much the same characteristics as the care relationship and requires a balancing of the needs and interests of the two parties. On the other hand, access to adequate care could be perceived as a basic civil and human right.

Book

Promoting independence for older persons with disabilities: selected papers from the 2006 International Conference on Aging, Disability and Independence

Editors:
MANN William C., HELAL Adbelsalam, (eds.)
Publisher:
IOS Press
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
235p.
Place of publication:
Amsterdam

This book includes 25 full-length papers under five of the seven ICADI tracks: smart homes, robotics, telehealth, home medications and universal design, and assistive devices and workplace adaptations.

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