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Book Full text available online for free

Older people in Scotland: results from the Scottish Household Survey 1999-2000 (summary)

Authors:
MACDONALD Charlotte, RAAB Gillian
Publisher:
The Stationery Office
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Scottish Executive aims to promote active ageing and to support continued independence in later life. This analysis of Scottish Household Survey (SHS) data is designed to inform that strategy and highlight trends in social and demographic characteristics.

Book Full text available online for free

Older people in Scotland: results from the Scottish Household Survey 1999-2000 (full text)

Authors:
MACDONALD Charlotte, RAAB Gillian
Publisher:
The Stationery Office
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
79p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Scottish Executive aims to promote active ageing and to support continued independence in later life. This analysis of Scottish Household Survey (SHS) data is designed to inform that strategy and highlight trends in social and demographic characteristics.

Book Full text available online for free

Moving on: migration trends in later life

Authors:
PENNINGTON Jenny, INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC POLICY RESEARCH
Publisher:
Hanover
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
28
Place of publication:
Staines

To mark its 50th anniversary, Hanover has commissioned a series of 'think pieces' and new research from nine think tanks from across the political spectrum, that question assumptions and perceptions regarding housing policy and the ageing population. This paper from IPPR considers the reality, challenges and opportunities of mobility in later life. It explores migration trends of older people within England in the context of wider migration trends, using data to corroborate these trends, and the challenges that movement can present. It sets out the lessons that these insights give for policymakers, local areas and care providers, and the steps that should be taken in order to meet the needs of this large age group It finds that there is some truth in the stereotype that older people move to: areas where there is already a large proportion of older people, particularly coastal areas, and that they move from urban areas to small rural destinations. However, the data is also clear that movement patterns are more varied, suggesting that older people also move to areas without a history of older in-migration. (Original abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Supported housing and housing for older people: client groups and distribution

Author:
HOUSING CORPORATION
Publisher:
Housing Corporation
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
20p.
Place of publication:
London

This study uses the Regulatory and Statistical Return (RSR) time series database to examine how the stock of housing aimed at particular needs and owned and managed by housing associations has changed since the 1988 Housing Act. It was produced on behalf of the Housing Corporation by Jennie Spenceley, Christine Whitehead and Caroline Kiddle of Dataspring, Centre for Housing and Research Planning, University of Cambridge.

Book

The dementia epidemic: where Scotland is now and the challenge ahead

Authors:
WILSON Gillian, FEARNLEY Kate
Publisher:
Alzheimer Scotland
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
52p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Dementia is a key health issue facing Scotland over the coming decades. As our population ages there is projected to be a 75% increase in the number of people with dementia. The 'Dementia Epidemic' report aims to give a picture of current and future numbers of people with dementia based on the best current evidence, to outline current service provision and issues of quality and adequacy, to look at the economic impact of dementia and to set out what strategies need to be put in place to manage or mitigate the increase in numbers. Dementia is a major cause of disability in people aged over 60. It contributes 11.2% of all years lived with disability, more than stroke (9%),musculoskeletal disorders (8.9%), cardiovascular disease (5%) and all forms of cancer (2.4%).In order to cope effectively with the projected increase in the numbers of people with dementia and the associated cost, it is essential that Scotland has a forward-looking strategy for dementia that seeks to minimise the numbers of people developing dementia, invests in anticipatory care and support for self management, provides sufficient good quality and cost-effective services, increases resources in line with demographic growth and supports research into the causes, treatment and care of people with dementia.

Journal article

Clinically significant non-major depression in a community-dwelling elderly population: epidemiological findings

Authors:
CHEN Cheng-Sheng, CHONG Mian-Yoon, TSANG Hin-Yeung
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 22(6), June 2007, pp.557-562.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The aim of this study was to investigate the 1-month prevalence, symptom profiles and demographic correlates in late-life clinically significant non-major depression (CSNMD) among a community-dwelling elderly population. One thousand five hundred subjects aged 65 years and older, who were randomly selected from three communities in Taiwan, received comprehensive psychiatric assessment by trained psychiatrists. Two categorical diagnoses of depressive disorder, including major depression and CSNMD, were made. The 1-month prevalence was calculated. Frequencies of depressive symptoms across CSNMD and major depression were compared. The risks of CSNMD based on demographic characteristics were estimated using multinominal logistic regression. The 1-month prevalence of CSNMD among the community-dwelling elderly was 8.8%. Symptoms of diminished interest, appetite changes, sleep disturbance, worthlessness or inappropriate guilt, trouble in concentrating or indecisiveness, and suicidal thoughts or acts were less frequent in CSNMD than in major depression, but symptoms of depressed mood, psychomotor changes, and fatigue or loss of energy were as frequent in both categories of illness. CSNMD shares similar demographic risks, such as living in an urban area, female gender and low educational status, with major depression. CSNMD is common among community-dwelling elders in Taiwan, and with its identical demographic characteristics, but qualitatively different presentation, the authors suggest CSNMD may be considered part of a spectrum of severe late life depressions with a distinct manifestation. Major depression and CSNMD may share common demographic characteristics with different manifestation. It is concluded that late-life depression is a dimensional disease.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Prognostic factors of disability of older people: a systematic review

Authors:
TAS Umit, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of General Practice, 57(537), April 2007, pp.319-323.
Publisher:
Royal College of General Practitioners

This study aims to review and summarise the evidence on the influence of sociodemographic, lifestyle, and (bio)medical variables on the course of prevalent disability and transition rates to different outcome categories in community-dwelling older people. Articles were identified through searches of PubMed, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases and reference lists of relevant articles. Prospective population studies that assessed disability at baseline and reported on associations between potential prognostic variables and disability were included. Methodological quality of studies was assessed by standardised criteria, after which relevant data were extracted. A synthesis of the available evidence was carried out. Nine cohort studies reported transition rates and eight cohort studies presented multivariate analyses on prognostic factors. There was some heterogeneity among studies in definition and assessment of disability. There is moderate to strong evidence that higher age, cognitive impairment, vision impairment, and poor self-rated health are prognostic factors of disability. Prognostic factors, partly modifiable, are identified that should be taken into account in targeting treatment and care for older people with disabilities. Further conceptual and methodological standardisation is required in order to enable a meta-analysis and obtain higher levels of evidence.

Book Full text available online for free

Growing older and wiser together: a futures view on positive ageing

Author:
SCOTLAND'S FUTURES FORUM
Publisher:
Scotland's Futures Forum
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
44p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The results of an investigation commissioned in December 2005 by Scotland’s Futures Forum to take a futures look at some of the issues around ageing and specifically to stimulate public debate on the positive aspects of Scotland having an ageing population are presented. The Project Board concentrated on four specific themes: finance, employment, intergenerational issues and wellbeing. This report also sketches three scenarios of what the future might look like. Key questions arising from the project are outlined. Initially, the Forum conducted a system mapping exercise starting from the ‘current position’ in Scotland and then undertook a series of participative exercises with the view of both testing some of the learning to emerge from Stage 1 and to collect wider qualitative data around ageing.

Book Full text available online for free

Building our futures: meeting the housing needs of an ageing population

Authors:
EDWARDS Margaret, HARDING Ed
Publisher:
International Longevity Centre UK
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
27p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The aim of this report is to assist people involved in planning for housing and related services. It is specifically about the implications of an ageing population over the next 25 years for the key government priority of preparing decent homes for 'the whole community'.

Journal article

Socio-demographic and other characteristics in persons 50 years and older with HIV/AIDS in five countries

Authors:
NOKES Kathleen M., et al
Journal article citation:
Global Ageing, 4(2), August 2006, pp.5-13.

This article describes socio-demographic and HIV-related characteristics of people aged 50 and older living with HIV/AIDS in Columbia, Norway, Puerto Rico, Taiwan, and the United States. The article is based on findings from a small cross-national study where participants completed an extensive socio-demographic survey. The sample consisted of 175 people from the United States, 10 from Puerto Rico, 17 from Taiwan, 19 from Norway and 9 from Colombia.

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