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Book Full text available online for free

Being included in your community and getting the support that is right for you: ideas about ways the Local Area Co-ordination approach can support older people

Author:
OUTSIDE THE BOX DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT
Publisher:
Outside the Box Development Support
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This report includes a summary of the main points raised at two workshop with older people run by Outside the Box in August 2006 to look at how the approach which underpins Local Area Co-ordination could be used to support people. The report also includes ideas about how people can take on this discussion in their areas and draws on examples and experiences from people in Scotland and in other places.

Journal article

Reminiscence triggers in community-dwelling older adults in Japan

Authors:
HANAOKA Hideaki, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 79(4), 2016, pp.220-227.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

Introduction: Visual and auditory cues have been highlighted as methods to trigger reminiscences; however, the basis of this practice remains unclear. Here the authors conducted a preliminary cross-sectional study to identify reminiscence cues and their scientific basis by investigating the relationship between reminiscences in elderly people and their reminiscence cues. Method: The participants were 126 older adults aged 65 years or over. They were asked about the experiences of reminiscences in response to stimuli such as photographs, music, or smells. Data on the frequency and quality of reminiscences were collected. Geriatric depression scale and simple personality test for the elderly were assessed. Results: A multiple regression analysis revealed that reminiscences tended to be more frequent in older and less sociable participants. Highly sociable participants with reminiscences in response to olfactory stimuli tended to have positive reminiscences, while participants with less sociability and past unresolved issues tended to have negative reminiscences. Conclusion: To understand the process of reminiscence in an older person, it is important to consider the person’s age, personality characteristics, and past unresolved issues. In addition, olfactory stimuli may also evoke pleasant reminiscences. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Ageism and social integration of older ddults in their neighborhoods in Israel

Authors:
VITMAN Adi, IECOVICH Esther, ALFASI Nurit
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 54(2), 2014, pp.177-189.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

Purpose: The article aims to examine the extent to which ageism is connected with the social integration of older adults in their neighbourhoods and to identify factors that explain social integration. Design and Methods: A convenience sample that included 300 older adults aged 65 and older and 300 younger people under the age of 65 who resided in 3 neighbourhoods in Tel-Aviv with varied socioeconomic status were interviewed. Kogan’s Attitudes toward Old People scale was used to probe ageism. Social integration index included 3 dimensions: frequency of participation in activities in the neighbourhood, familiarity with neighbours, and sense of neighbourhood. Hierarchical regression analyses examined 3 groups of independent variables: older adults’ sociodemographic characteristics, their perceived health and outdoor mobility, and neighbourhoods’ characteristics including level of ageism. Results: Neighbourhoods varied by levels of ageism and social integration. Higher level of social integration of older neighbourhoods’ residents was explained by a combination of factors: younger age, better self-rated health, and fewer limitations of outdoor mobility, lower levels of ageism reported by a sample of younger respondents, and higher socioeconomic status of the neighbourhood. Implications: To enable better social integration, intergeneration programmes should be developed to decrease ageism, and in order to make communities more age-friendly, there is need to facilitate accessibility to services and public spaces. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

The socio-economic contribution of older people in the UK

Author:
COOK Julia
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 15(4), 2011, pp.141-146.
Publisher:
Emerald

In the UK, over 65s are often seen as a burden on society's resources. Older people make a huge contribution to the UK's society but their potential is not always realised. The aim of this paper is to give evidence of the contribution of older people, the difference they are making in their communities, and how the roles they take on can only become more important. It draws on research published by the Women's Royal Voluntary Service (WRVS) in March 2011 which highlights older people’s contributions to economic and social growth in the UK. The paper is set out in 6 sections: an overview of WRVS; challenges of an ageing society; the ‘grey pound’; provision of social care; volunteering; and non-financial and other contributions of older people. Case studies are used to provide more detail on the contribution of, and opportunities for, older volunteers.

Book Full text available online for free

English forums on ageing: a first step in good practice

Author:
UK ADVISORY FORUM ON AGEING
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
Rev. ed.

The UK Advisory Forum on Ageing offers older people a direct line to government to comment on new policy ideas, services, legislation and areas important to them. It aims to improve the well-being of older people and to respond to the opportunities and challenges of an ageing society. Government is encouraging the development of local and regional communication channels to identify common themes that need to be brought to the attention of national government, provide direction and leadership on local and regional issues affecting older people, and to help spread good practice locally. This document offers some ideas for discussion and development, which emerged from a DWP-facilitated workshop held in December 2009.

Journal article Full text available online for free

How different dance forms construct a sense of community amongst older people

Authors:
PAULSON Sue, WILLIG Carla
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 21(1), January 2011, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

This study was designed to compare and contrast the health benefits of two different dance forms for older people where a particular dancing partner was not required. The first author participated in two circle dance groups and two Scottish country dance groups, attended by older people over the course of a year. A ethnographic diary and narrative style interviews were analysed in three stages: line by line open coding, focused coding summarising the issues in each paragraph, and identification of the emerging narrative themes. This paper discusses to the role of circle dance and Scottish country dance in the development of a sense of community among participants in the dance groups. The authors argue that circle dance and Scottish country dance are very conducive to constructing a sense of community amongst older people. There are opportunities to participate actively in the particular ‘cultures of dance’ besides additional opportunities to socialise as a member of a dance group. It is concluded that, as such, circle and Scottish country dance can be an empowering activity for some older people.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Voices of the elders: on creating aging-friendly communities from a member of the 'target population'

Author:
LEITCH Anne
Journal article citation:
Generations, 33(2), Summer 2009, pp.66-67. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

The article is a reproduction of a post to the 'CollaborationCafé', an online forum for participants in Creating Aging-Friendly Communities, a free Web-based international conference produced by the University of California at Berkeley’s Center for the Advanced Study of Aging Services in collaboration with Community Strengths. The writer laments her experience in a gated senior community when she instead wants to be engaged with the more world. She urges 'the experts' to design communities that can meet a person's needs while maximizing the individual's ability to contribute to the collective continuity of a community.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Moving beyond place: aging in community

Authors:
THOMAS William H., BLANCHARD Janice M.
Journal article citation:
Generations, 33(2), Summer 2009, pp.12-17. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

The current practice of institutionalising older people in need of care is undesirable because it consumes large quantities of financial capital while it also destroys reservoirs of social capital. Aging in place, with its dwelling-centric approach, relies heavily on dollar-denominated professional and paraprofessional services while offering older people little or no opportunity to create or deploy reserves of social capital. Aging in community presents a viable and appealing alternative to both approaches. Different types of communities are discussed.

Journal article

Building to last: the importance of designing life-ling communities

Author:
CANN Paul
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 11(4), December 2008, pp.10-13.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article discusses how policy-makers and local government need to listen to the voice of older people when designing the communities we live in. It highlights how simple, joined-up thinking can make a difference to older people's lives.

Journal article

Post office closures

Author:
HARRIS Gretel
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 11(4), December 2008, pp.14-16.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article explains Age Concern's campaign against planned post office closures, and argues that post offices play a much more vital role in people's lives than the public consultations have given credit for.

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