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Journal article

People who fall between a rock and a hard place

Author:
VAUX Gary
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 4.6.98, 1998, p.29.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on how confusion between the Benefits Agency and the Department of Social Security has resulted in many pensioners losing out on benefits.

Book

No benefit in growing old: the evidence of elderly CAB clients in Scotland

Author:
CITIZEN'S ADVICE SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Citizen's Advice Scotland
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
41p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Report looking at the take-up of social security benefits by older people, and the reasons for not claiming entitlements.

Journal article

Low claims bonus

Author:
COHEN Phil
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 6.12.96, 1996, p.14.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The Treasury is benefiting from the extremely low take-up of benefits among older people. Argues some of this bonus should be ploughed back into making sure people receive what they are entitled to, rather than pursuing alleged benefits fiddlers.

Journal article

Are old age pensions for urban Africans family allowances? Implications for the reconstruction and development programme

Authors:
McKENDRICK B.W., SHINGWENYANA B.Z.
Journal article citation:
Social Work Maatskaplike Werk, 31(3), August 1995, pp.288-235.

Seeks to provide factual data to support or refute family dependence on old age pensions in South Africa, by reporting on a survey showing the way in which a group of urban African old age pensioners use their ex gratia old age pensions. The purpose is to establish the extent to which children and other socially vulnerable people are supported by the old age pension of one family member. If this support is extensive, the provision of state old age pensions must be thought of as a means of protecting and nurturing children and family life, and not only as a way of assisting elderly people in financial need.

Journal article

Overcoming obstacles to equity release

Authors:
TERRY Rachel, GIBSON Richard
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 10(1), August 2007, pp.18-22.
Publisher:
Emerald

More than two million older home owners have housing assets worth over £50,000, but incomes so low that they qualify for means-tested benefits. This article identifies the obstacles that deter asset-rich, income-poor home owners from drawing on their housing equity, and suggests ways of overcoming them. The focus is on paying for additional care at home, improvements and repairs. The article draws on a recent study undertaken for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Book Full text available online for free

Just for the record: findings from the pension benefit outreach project 2007

Authors:
TRUST HOUSING ASSOCIATION, HANOVER SCOTLAND, BIELD HOUSING ASSOCIATION
Publisher:
Trust Housing Association Ltd
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
21p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Pension Benefit Outreach Project was a project which tackled the acute problem of poor take-up of pension and other benefits by older people in the Black Minority and Ethnic (BME) Communities. The project was created through a partnership between Trust, Hanover (Scotland) and Bield Housing Associations and their existing Equal Opportunities Programme. The project received external funding for 18 months and commenced in 2005 and involved people from the Pakistani, Indian and Chinese communities and also people of Turkish, African, Iranian and Arab origin. The main purpose of this project was to help individual BME older people to understand what benefits and allowances they are entitled to and to help them receive these. The results of the project are reported. The success of this project underlined the importance of active outreach work.

Book Full text available online for free

Evaluation of the intensive activity period 50plus pilots

Authors:
ATKINSON Joan, et al
Publisher:
Corporate Document Services; Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
163p.
Place of publication:
Leeds

This research provides qualitative evidence towards the evaluation of the IAP 50 Plus Pilots, which trialled the benefits of making participation in the Intensive Activity Period mandatory for New Deal 25 plus participants aged between 50 and 59. The research focused on four of the 14 pilot sites, and was principally based on face-to-face interviews involving 75 staff, 23 providers and 182 participants, in two waves, in spring 2005 and winter 2005/06. The research confirmed that the pilots were delivered without undue difficulty largely because, with quite small numbers of customers involved, they represented only a fairly modest extension of existing practice, required no significant change in the organisation or provision, and drew on an experienced cadre of NDPAs and IAP providers.

Journal article Full text available online for free

An end to the means?

Author:
YOUNG Andrew
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 13.1.05, 2005, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Pension credit has not been in operation for more than a year and it has helped many people over 60. However, there are sill aspects of the system that are unpopular. The recent interim report by the Pensions Commission puts the success of pension credit in a long-term perspective.

Journal article

Proactive, targeted benefits advice for older people in general practice: a feasibility study

Authors:
TOEG Daniel, at al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 11(2), March 2003, pp.124-128.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Aimed to assess a welfare benefits and advice screening programme offered in a systematic and inclusive way to all patients aged 80 and over registered with an inner-city NHS group practice with 7 full-time GPs and a list of 12,000 of whom 280 were identified as 80 and over. Using a combination of telephone calls, surgery attendances and home visits, an advice worker contacted as many of these as possible. A wide range of advice and assistance of both a statutory and non-statutory nature was offered. Follow-up contacts and liaison with the patients' own GPs were arranged as necessary. Contact was made with 206. The adviser made 98 home visits, carried out 82 consultations in the surgery and did 109 telephone interviews. Findings indicate a total of £137,819 was gained in increased annual income amongst the screened patients and a further £11,433 was awarded in one-off payments. A wide range of other benefits and help, including referral to other services and organisations, was gained. Elderly patients within the practice were under-claiming benefits and had many previously unidentified needs. Adopting a proactive and inclusive approach to offering welfare and advice takes time and expense, but the resulting benefits make it worthwhile. Primary care is an effective base from which advice can be delivered and the development of closer working relationships between it and advice services can be an effective and efficient way of helping patients.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Fatal delay

Author:
NOSOWKA Geraldine
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 30.1.03, 2003, p.40.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at the findings of recent research which found that terminally ill people are failing to receive benefits on time, despite rules designed to help.

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