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Nutrition in community settings: a pathway and resource pack for health and social care professionals, the third sector, care home staff, relatives and carers

Author:
WALES. Welsh Assembly Government
Publisher:
Wales. Welsh Assembly Government
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
24p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

Focusing on the importance of ensuring that vulnerable and frail adults (particularly older people) living in their own homes, or in other community settings such as care homes, eat well and healthily, the aim of this document is to improve standards of nutrition for people living in the community. It is in two parts. Part 1 contains a pathway showing the framework of advice and support available to people who either care for those living in community settings or whose professional work brings them into contact with people who may have eating difficulties. It includes a commentary with notes for the general public and community organisations, and for health care professionals. Part 2 contains a resource pack with publications, advice leaflets, links to other sources of information, sample risk classifications and care plan templates, designed to help people using the pathway to source information needed to manage situations effectively.

Journal article

Understanding health anxiety among community dwelling seniors with varying degrees of frailty

Authors:
BOURGAULT-FAGNOU Michelle D., HADJISTAVROPOULOS Heather D.
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 13(2), March 2009, pp.226-237.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The levels of health anxiety among younger adults and older people, with either low or high levels of frailty were compared. Predictors of health anxiety in older people were explored. Forty-nine seniors with high levels of frailty were compared with 63 seniors with low levels of frailty and 130 younger adults. Comparisons were made on the Illness Attitudes Scale (IAS) and on a Medically Adjusted Illness Attitudes Scale, an adapted version ensuring scores reflect health anxiety, and not greater illness. Seniors also completed measures of frailty, pain, depression, trait anxiety and coping. Results varied depending on the health anxiety measure. Using the traditional IAS, seniors with high frailty experienced greater levels of health anxiety than seniors with low-frailty and younger adults. Using the medically adjusted version, seniors with high frailty experienced similar levels of heath anxiety compared with younger adults; seniors with low frailty had the lowest levels of health anxiety. Using multiple regression analysis, emotional preoccupation and trait anxiety uniquely predicted health anxiety among seniors. Researchers and clinicians should ensure that health anxiety measures actually assess health anxiety and not physical illness. Using an appropriate health anxiety measure, the results suggest seniors with relatively fewer health problems may experience reduced health anxiety compared with other older adults and younger adults. The results are considered in the context of research on aging and anxiety. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

Journal article

Insight, quality of life, and functional capacity in middle-aged and older adults with schizophrenia

Authors:
ROSEMAN Ashley S., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 23(7), July 2008, pp.760-765.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The quality of life (QOL) for individuals with schizophrenia is determined by a number of factors, not limited to symptomatology. The current study examined lack of insight as one such factor that may influence subjective QOL or functional capacity. It was hypothesized that insight would significantly interact with symptom severity to influence subjective QOL. Insight was not expected to influence the relation between symptom severity and functional capacity. Participants were middle-aged and older outpatients who met diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, and subsyndromal depression. Insight, psychopathology, and subjective QOL were assessed via semi-structured interviews and functional capacity was assessed via performance-based measures. Insight interacts with negative symptom severity to predict subjective QOL. Severity of negative symptoms and insight contribute directly to functional capacity. Individuals with intact insight may be better able to manage their symptoms, resulting in improved QOL. Treatment implications for improving the QOL of middle age and older adults with schizophrenia are discussed.

Journal article

Green gauge

Author:
JONES Ray
Journal article citation:
Care and Health Magazine, 3.05.05, 2005, p.32.
Publisher:
Care and Health

The author, director of adult and community services at Wiltshire County Council, provides a personal view on what the Green Paper adult social care means for disabled and older people.

Journal article

Figuring out adult abuse

Authors:
MCCREADIE Claudine, QUIGLEY Leo
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 4.2.99, 1999, pp.24-25.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

As recognition of the prevalence of adult abuse increases, the authors look at the lessons to be drawn from an experiment in Sheffield.

Journal article

Working with older adults and their families - a review

Authors:
RICHARDSON Carolyn A., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Family Therapy, 16(3), August 1994, pp.225-240.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Discusses family work with older adults by exploring some of the related literature published in the past ten years, and compares psychoeducational and systems-based approaches to work with later life families. Issues of bias and omissions in the existing literature, and the definition of family therapy with this client group are raised. Areas for future research are indicated.

Journal article

Alone and vulnerable

Author:
CLODE Drew
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 30.1.92, 1992, p.14.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks at recent guidance from the ADSS on adults at risk and options available, which include extending powers of guardianship, as suggested by the Law Commission, and establishing multidisciplinary welfare tribunals.

Book

Adulthood and aging: a interdisciplinary, developmental view

Author:
KIMMEL Douglas C
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication year:
1974
Pagination:
484p.
Place of publication:
New York
Journal article

Developing the assistive technology consumer market for people aged 50-70

Authors:
WARD Gillian, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 37(5), 2017, pp.1050-1067.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Within the United Kingdom (UK), assisted living technologies are mostly provided through statutory health and social care services following assessment of individual need and application of eligibility criteria. This paper describes the first UK study to explore and develop business approaches and innovations required to make electronic assisted living technologies more accessible to consumers in their fifties and sixties. A robust mixed-method approach was used including a large sample size for a consumer survey, triangulation of methods and confirmation of research findings through validation workshops. This three-year study makes significant and original contributions to understanding consumer needs in this rapidly changing market and offers unique insights into the needs and wants of people aged 50–70. Analysis shows significant differences between consumer and business perceptions, indicating that marketing is not closely aligned to consumers' needs and is affecting the development of the market. New approaches to consumer-led business models are presented to improve information and marketing aimed at 50–70-year-old consumers. A ‘Broker/Independent Advisor’ business model showed most potential for meeting the needs of both consumer and business stakeholders. Findings support future development of an assisted living consumer market to meet growing levels of need and demand, and to offer greater consumer choice of mainstream technologies to enable people to age in place. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A scoping review of treatments for older adults with substance use problems

Authors:
MOWBRAY Orion, QUINN Adam
Journal article citation:
Research on Social Work Practice, 26(1), 2016, pp.74-87.
Publisher:
Sage

Objectives: To identify effective treatment services for older, substance-using adults, an examination of the evidence associated with interventions for this group is presented. Methods: Using explicit, validated criteria to identify effective interventions, 22 publications were included in a review and were subject to a critical appraisal of study methodology. Results: The review identified four types of substance use treatment service settings for older adults, with mixed efficacy. These settings included (1) primary care settings or health clinics, (2) combined individual and group-based settings, (3) individual-based treatment settings, and (4) multiple treatment/multisite settings. Conclusion: Analyses of these publications revealed primary care settings or health clinic settings offered the most evidence of effective interventions, with noticeable gaps in research on interventions within other settings. Implications for social work practice and research are discussed. (Publisher abstract)

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