Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 567

Journal article

Time for caring? Elderly care employees' occupational activities in the cross draft between their work priorities, 'must-do's' and meaningfulness

Authors:
NILSSON Emma, NILSSON Kerstin
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Care Coordination, 20(1-2), 2017, pp.8-16.
Publisher:
Sage

An increasing number of older people in the population will bring new challenges for the society and care coordination. One of the most important questions in care coordination is the employees’ work performance. The overall aim of this study was to examine care employees’ experience of factors that rule how they allocate their time and tasks in the care work. The study was qualitative and consists of focus group interviews with 36 employees in elderly care in five Swedish municipalities. Much of the work that care employees perform is controlled by others in the municipality organised health care. The employees had a limited possibility to decide what should be given priority in their work. However, the employees who participated in the focus group interviews did not want to prioritise tasks and duties they felt were faulty or in direct conflict with their own convictions. When employees experienced that the assistance assessments were correct and helpful to the individual elderly patient this contributed to the employees’ priority and performance of the task. The formal and informal control systems caused the employees’ priority to be mainly quantitative and visible work tasks, rather than more qualitative tasks and care giving to the elderly. In the intention to organise good care coordination that fit each elderly patients’ need it is important that those who work closest to the patient to a greater extent are given the opportunity to make their voice heard in decisions of care planning and assistance assessments. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Scottish dementia strategy - progress still needed

Author:
PEARSON Jim
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dementia Care, 25(6), 2017, pp.27-29.
Publisher:
Hawker

A third national dementia strategy has just been published by the Scottish government, but the author questions how it will differ from the other two. The article describes the historical background, how it was developed, the aims and commitments of the strategy and what the author considers to be its shortcomings. (Original abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The role of care homes in end of life care. Briefing 2: place and cause of death for permanent and temporary residents of care homes

Author:
NATIONAL END OF LIFE CARE INTELLIGENCE NETWORK
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
14
Place of publication:
London

This briefing paper describes recent trends in the demographics of people who receive end of life care in a care home, presenting data on the place and cause of death for permanent and temporary residents of care homes. It also provides analyses of variation by geographical region. It reports that nearly two thirds (62 per cent) of people who died in care homes have dementia or Alzheimer’s disease as an underlying or contributory cause of death. It is the second of two briefings produced by National End of Life Care Intelligence Network to describe the important role that care homes play in the care of people at the end of life. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Pembrokeshire housing's sheltered housing co-design service review: case study 137

Authors:
EDWARDS Keith, BLANLUET Noreen
Publisher:
Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

A case study of a review of services in five sheltered schemes and three linked semi-sheltered schemes for older people, carried out by Pembrokeshire Housing. Based on co-production principles, the review included full engagement with residents and used their unique expertise as a prerequisite for designing a service that would meet the needs of older people now and in the future. The case study looks at the stages of the co-production process and outlines key learning points. Learning points included being open and honest with residents, which helped develop trust and ensuring co-production is a genuine process. The co-production process also led to the identification of untapped resources among staff and residents. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Imagined bodies: architects and their constructions of later life

Authors:
BUSE Christina E., et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 37(7), 2017, pp.1435-1457.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This article comprises a sociological analysis of how architects imagine the ageing body when designing residential care homes for later life and the extent to which they engage empathetically with users. Drawing on interviews with architectural professionals based in the United Kingdom, the authors offer insight into the ways in which architects envisage the bodies of those who they anticipate will populate their buildings. Deploying the notions of ‘body work’ and ‘the body multiple’, this analysis reveals how architects imagined a variety of bodies in nuanced ways. These imagined bodies emerge as they talked through the practicalities of the design process. Moreover, their conceptions of bodies were also permeated by prevailing ideologies of caring: although the authors found that they sought to resist dominant discourses of ageing, they nevertheless reproduced these discourses. Architects’ constructions of bodies are complicated by the collaborative nature of the design process, where the authors' find an incessant juggling between the competing demands of multiple stakeholders, each of whom anticipate other imagined bodies and seek to shape the design of buildings to meet requirements. The findings extend a nascent sociological literature on architecture and social care by revealing how architects participate in the shaping of care for later life as ‘body workers’, but also how their empathic aspirations can be muted by other imperatives driving the marketisation of care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Inclusion/exclusion criteria in late life depression antidepressant efficacy trials

Authors:
ZIMMERMAN Mark, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 32(9), 2017, pp.1009-1016.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objective: The generalisability of antidepressant efficacy trials (AETs) has been questioned. No studies have examined the inclusion/exclusion criteria used in placebo-controlled studies of late life depression and compared them to the criteria used in non-late life AETs. Method: The authors conducted a comprehensive literature review of placebo-controlled AETs published from January, 1995 through December, 2014. They compared the inclusion/exclusion criteria used in the 18 studies of late life depression to those used in non-late life depression. Results: There were nine inclusion/exclusion criteria that were used in more than half of the late life depression AETs: minimum severity on a symptom severity scale (100.0%), significant suicidal ideation (77.8%), psychotic features during the current episode of depression or history of a psychotic disorder (94.4%), history of bipolar disorder (77.8%), diagnosis of alcohol or drug abuse or dependence (83.3%), presence of a comorbid nondepressive, nonsubstance use Axis I disorder (55.6%), episode duration too short (66.7%), and an insufficient score on a cognitive screen (88.3%) or the presence of a cognitive disorder (55.6%). There were some differences between the late life and non-late life depression studies—use of a screening measure of cognitive functioning, presence of a cognitive disorder such as dementia, and the minimum depression severity cutoff score required at baseline. Conclusions: The inclusion/exclusion criteria in AETs of late life depression were generally similar to the criteria used in non-late life depression (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Mentalization in dementia care: an autoethnographic account of a project worker’s experiences

Authors:
LUXMOORE Bethany, McEVOY Phil
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 21(3), 2017, pp.147-156.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Mentalization is a psychodynamic concept that can help us to understand our emotional responses to others. The purpose of this paper to illustrate how the concept of mentalization may be applied in dementia care. Design/methodology/approach: An autoethnographic account of the author’s experiences (first author), working as a project manager in which the author used the concept of mentalization to pay close attention to how the author’s emotional responses to people with dementia influenced thier communicative interactions. Findings: This paper outlines how the author processed the author’s own internal experiences in both mentalizing and non-mentalizing modes, as the author wrestled with feelings of conscious incompetence. In the non-mentalizing mode, the author was pre-occupied with the author’s own anxieties. The author struggled to relate to or make sense of the experiences of the individuals with advanced dementia that the author engaged with. Moving towards a mentalizing stance helped the author to attune to the embodied experiences of the people with dementia and recognise the reciprocal nature of our communicative interactions. Originality/value: This paper illustrates the role that mentalization may play in developing natural and authentic strategies to support communicative engagement in dementia care. These strategies may be of potential value to family carers. Family carers who can maintain a mentalizing stance may be more able to respond in empathic, person- centred ways to people who are living with dementia. On the other hand, non-mentalizing responses may be a root cause of mis-understanding and emotional disengagement. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Improving older people's oral health

Author:
ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS. Faculty of Dental Surgery
Publisher:
Royal College of Surgeons. Faculty of Dental Surgery
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

This report raises concerns about the significant impact that poor oral health is having on older people’s general health and quality of life. It makes a number of recommendations to improve oral healthcare for older people in England. They include: that key health and social care professionals should receive training in oral health; for regulators to make standards of oral care part of their assessments of hospitals and care homes; and for Government, health services, local authorities, care providers, regulators and the oral health profession to work together to improve access to dental services for older people. Although primarily applicable to England, a number of the recommendations also relevant for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Elderly volunteering and psychological well-being

Author:
HO Hua-Chin
Journal article citation:
International Social Work, 60(4), 2017, pp.1028-1038.
Publisher:
Sage

This study was designed to construct a model based on the concept of psychological well-being, in order to verify the relationship between Taiwanese elderly volunteering and their psychological well-being. Research data were collected via a questionnaire administered to the target population of this study, senior residents of Pingtung County aged 65 or more. The data were then tested and verified by confirmative factor analysis and structural equation modelling. The overall model showed higher levels of psychological well-being for the elderly who participated in volunteer work than those who did not, which again confirmed the positive relation between volunteer work and psychological well-being. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The use of fortified foods to treat malnutrition among older adults: a systematic review

Authors:
DOUGLAS Joy W., LAWRENCE Jeannine C., KNOWLDEN Adam P.
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 18(2), 2017, pp.104-119.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Food fortification with common kitchen ingredients has been suggested to improve nutritional intake. The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the efficacy of food fortification on calorie and protein intake among older adults. Design/methodology/approach: A systematic search was conducted using Boolean search logic and seven research databases to identify interventions using fortified foods to increase calorie and protein intake among older adults. Ten studies published in English since 1996 were eligible for inclusion. Study quality was evaluated using an adapted Modified Jadad Questionnaire. Findings: Food fortification was associated with increased calorie intake in eight studies, increased protein intake in five studies, and increased body weight in three studies. However, studies were limited by lack of rigor in methodology and small sample sizes. Originality/value: Food fortification may improve calorie and protein intake, but results are limited by study weaknesses. Additionally, it is unclear whether improved intake results in improved clinical outcomes. (Publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts