Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 620

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Who knows best? Older people's contribution to understanding and preventing avoidable hospital admissions

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
18 mins 50 secs
Place of publication:
London

This video summarises the key findings of a research project conducted by the University of Birmingham’s Health Services Management Centre and the Department of Social Policy and Social Work which interviewed 104 older people about their emergency admissions to hospital. The research looked at how the older people were admitted to hospital, whether they felt this was the best place for them and what alternatives might have been explored. Similar questions were also asked of a GP and / or hospital doctor representing as many of these older people as possible. Overall, the study found that most older people were admitted to hospital appropriately. Only nine of 104 older people (almost 9%) felt that hospital was not the right place for them. Key findings covered in the video include: delays in seeking help; prevention and early intervention; poor communication; proactive initial approaches; working with GPs and paramedics; and the underfunding of social care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Improving oral health for adults in care homes

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

This quick guide, developed for care home managers and their staff, explains how to achieve good oral health for people who live in care homes. Based on the NICE guideline on oral health for adults in care homes, it covers: how poor oral health can affect people’s ability to eat, speak and socialise normally; how to carry out an oral health assessment; the knowledge and skills care staff need to know to support residents maintain good oral health; and what the Care Quality Commission expects from care homes. The guide includes an oral health assessment tool and provides links to further information. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Diversity in older age: older refugees and asylum seekers

Author:
CENTRE FOR POLICY ON AGEING
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
9
Place of publication:
London

This review summarises findings from selected literature and statistics on older refugees and asylum seekers. It is one of a series of rapid reviews commissioned by Age UK into the diversity that exists in the older population and the inequalities faced by specific groups of older people. It provides a demographic overview of the number of older refugees and asylum seekers in Europe and the UK and highlights some of their specific needs. Issues facing older refugees and asylum seekers include low income, language barriers, the risk of loneliness and a lack of social networks, and often a loss of social status. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Diversity in older age: Gypsies and Travellers

Author:
CENTRE FOR POLICY ON AGEING
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
7
Place of publication:
London

This review summarises findings from selected literature and statistics on older Gypsies and Travellers. It is one of a series of rapid reviews commissioned by Age UK into the diversity that exists in the older population and the inequalities faced by specific groups of older people. Areas covered include: demographics, health, housing, and family and community. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Garden visiting as a meaningful occupation for people in later life

Authors:
LEAVER Rosemary, WISEMAN Tania
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 79(12), 2016, pp.768-775.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

Introduction: Garden visiting, as described in this study, involves visiting private gardens which householders have temporarily opened to the public, in support of charity. In the United Kingdom, garden visiting is a popular occupation which attracts 750,000 people each year. The connections between active gardening and wellbeing are well established, particularly for people in later life. This research explores visiting other people’s gardens for leisure in order to deepen our understanding of how garden visiting is experienced as an occupation. Method: Seven people aged between 60 and 81 years old who considered themselves fully retired were interviewed whilst walking through parks and public gardens. Thematic analysis with inductive coding was used to analyse the data. Findings: Four themes emerged: time and wellbeing, embodied wellbeing, being part of a gardening community and pondering the creator. Conclusion: Garden visiting is a complex occupation which brings far-reaching benefits to individuals and communities. Garden visiting also has important implications for increasing wellbeing by grounding people in the present and promoting sensory engagement. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Access to bridge employment: who finds and who does not find work after retirement?

Authors:
DINGEMANS Ellen, HENKENS Kene, VAN SOLINGE Hanna
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 56(4), 2016, pp.630-640.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

Purpose of the study: Empirical studies on the determinants of bridge employment have often neglected the fact that some retirees may be unsuccessful in finding a bridge job. We present an integrative framework that emphasises socioeconomic factors, health status, social context, and psychological factors to explain why some people fully retired after career exit, some participated in bridge jobs, while others unsuccessfully searched for one. Design and methods: Using Dutch panel data for 1,221 retirees, we estimated a multinomial logit model to explain participation in, and unsuccessful searches for, bridge employment. Results: About 1 in 4 retirees participated in bridge employment after retirement, while 7% searched unsuccessfully for such work. Particularly those who experienced involuntary career exit were found to have a higher probability of being unsuccessful at finding bridge employment. Implications: The current study provides evidence for the impact of the social context on post-retirement work and suggests a cumulative disadvantage in the work domain in later life. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Safe later lives: older people and domestic abuse

Author:
SAFELIVES
Publisher:
SafeLives
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
31
Place of publication:
London

This report focuses on older victims of domestic abuse, a group often overlooked in the literature that tends to focus on younger victims and perpetrators. It estimates that in the last year approximately 120,000 individuals aged 65+ have experienced at least one form of abuse (psychological, physical, sexual or financial). The report outlines the following six key findings: systematic invisibility of older people who are not represented in domestic abuse services and lack of recognition amongst some professionals of the phenomenon; long term abuse and dependency issues, which may add additional pressures to stay with an abusive partner; generational attitudes about abuse may make it hard to identify; increased risk of adult family abuse; services are not effectively targeted at older victims, and do not always meet their needs; and need for more coordination between services. The report argues that social care services need training to understand the dynamics of abuse in a caring relationship; they should target older people with messages that empower them to recognise their situation as abuse, and raise awareness of support available; and that services working with adults and their older parents must be trained to recognise abuse, and have clear referral pathways. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Perceived overload as a predictor of physical strain among spousal and adult child caregivers of frail elders in the community

Author:
KANG Suk-Young
Journal article citation:
Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 26(7-8), 2016, pp.636-647.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Family caregivers of frail elders can experience physical strain associated with caregiving. Identifying correlates of caregiver strain can provide an important impetus for tackling the causes and providing effective interventions. Utilizing data from the 1999 National Long-Term Care Survey, the current study examined correlates of caregiver physical strain among 956 family caregivers, using the stress process model. As multiple regression analyses indicated, the caregiver’s perceived overload predicted greater strain for both spousal and adult child caregivers. For both groups, common correlates of physical strain were caregiving demands, the caregiver’s perceived overload, and limitations placed on the caregiver’s life. The results demonstrate that the family relationship of the caregiver (spouse or adult child) leads to variations and dynamics in caregiver strains, due to qualitatively different relationships. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

A review of the biopsychosocial aspects of caregiving for aging family members

Authors:
COLVIN Alex D., BULLOCK Angela N.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Family Social Work, 19(5), 2016, pp.420-442.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

With the ever-increasing growth in the ageing population, the need for care providers will also continue to rise. Many of these caregivers will provide informal care to family members and friends at a price to their own physical, psychological, and social well-being. This article examines the phenomenon of caregiving and provides a review of the biological, psychological, and social impacts of caregiving to care providers. George Engel’s biopsychosocial model is explored to examine the biological, psychological, and social factors that can affect a caregiver’s health and well-being. This article further explores social work practice implications and strategies for future intervention to reduce caregiver burnout and aid in their self-preservation. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Revaluating aging in place: from traditional definitions to the continuum of care

Authors:
WEIL Joyce, SMITH Elizabeth
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 20(4), 2016, pp.223-230.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Traditional definitions of ageing in place often define ageing in place specifically as the ability to remain in one’s own home or community setting in later life. The purpose of this paper is to reframe ageing in place and show how narrowly defined ageing in place models can be potentially negative constructs that limit options for older adults. The authors propose a paradigm shift, or a re-framing of, the popularised idea of ageing in place. The authors challenge mainstream and literature-based beliefs that are deeply rooted to the idea that ageing in place ideally happens in the home in which a person has lived for many years. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews common concepts and constructs associated with ageing in place as well as gaps or exclusions, and US-based ageing in place policy initiatives favouring the ageing in place model. Findings: An expanded definition of ageing in place embraces heterogeneity in residence types and living options. A realistic assessment of person-environment fit, matching an older person’s capabilities to his or her environmental demands, allows for the development of additional ageing in place options for those living across the continuum of care. Social implications: Ageing in place should be moved from the personal “success” or “failure” of an older individual to include the role of society and societal views and policies in facilitating or hindering ageing in place options. The authors demonstrate that these options, in facilities within the continuum of care, can be thought of as appealing for older persons of all levels of physical and cognitive functioning. (Edited publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts