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Digital Media Full text available online for free

Dignity in care: nutrition for older people at home

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
10 minutes 23 seconds
Place of publication:
London

This film highlights the role of good nutritional care and hydration for older people living in their own homes. Food and mealtimes are very important to older people. Listening to what older people wish to eat and by preparing fresh food, the meal time experience can be enhanced. This film was previously available under the title 'Nutritional care for older people.' (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Home visits by commissioned welfare volunteers and psychological distress: a population-based study of 11,312 community-dwelling older people in Japan

Authors:
NOGUCHI Masayuki, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 30(12), 2015, pp.1156-1163.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objective: Social support is a resource for the older people that effectively reduces psychological distress, with or without specialised health service provision. This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine whether home visits by commissioned welfare volunteers (organisations of community residents assigned by national or local governments) are associated with a lower risk of psychological distress among the older people. Methods: Questionnaires were sent in August 2010 to all residents aged ≥65 years in three municipalities (n = 21,232) in Okayama Prefecture in Japan; 13,929 were returned (response rate = 65.6%). The final sample size for the analysis was 11,312 participants. Home visits, psychological distress (Kessler Psychological Distress Scale: K6 > 5), and severe psychological distress (K6 > 13) were measured by the questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for psychological distress, adjusting for age, gender, education, marital status, and qualification for long-term care insurance. Results: The prevalence was 41.4% for psychological distress and 6.5% for severe psychological distress among all participants. Home visits were significantly associated with a lower risk of psychological distress after adjusting for the covariates. These associations were comparable for men and women. The association was clearer for severe psychological distress. Conclusions: Home visits by commissioned welfare volunteers are significantly associated with a lower risk of psychological distress among older people (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Examining associations between sexual behaviours and quality of life in older adults

Authors:
FLYNN Taylor-Jane, GOW Alan J.
Journal article citation:
Age and Ageing, 44(5), 2015, pp.823-828.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Background: While sexual behaviours are potentially important for quality of life in older adults, they are under-researched. The current study examined associations between frequency and importance of sexual behaviours and quality of life in older adults. Method: One hundred and thirty-three participants (mean 74 years, SD = 7.1) provided information about the frequency with which they participated in six sexual behaviours and the perceived importance of these: touching/holding hands, embracing/hugging, kissing, mutual stroking, masturbating and intercourse. Participants also completed the WHO Quality of Life scale, providing an overall quality of life score, in addition to the domains of physical health, psychological health, social relationships and environment. Participants provided information on their marital status, living arrangements and self-reported health. Results: Both the frequency and importance of sexual behaviours were moderately positively correlated with quality of life (r = 0.52 and 0.47, respectively, both P < 0.001). In separate regression analyses, the frequency of sexual behaviours was a significant predictor of quality of life in the social relationships domain (β = 0.225, P < 0.05), and the importance of sexual behaviours was associated with the psychological domain (β = 0.151, P < 0.05), independent of the presence of a spouse/partner and self-reported health. Conclusions: With ageing trends, a broader understanding of the factors that influence quality of life in older adults is increasingly important. The current findings suggest that aspects of sexual behaviour and quality of life were positively associated. Researchers are encouraged to consider aspects of sex and sexuality when exploring determinants of well-being in later life. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Screening for depression in older adults on an acute medical ward: the validity of NICE guidance in using two questions

Authors:
ESIWE Collins, et al
Journal article citation:
Age and Ageing, 44(5), 2015, pp.771-775.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Background: Depression is common in older people in general hospital settings and associated with poor outcomes. This study aimed to evaluate the validity of two screening questions recommended by the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Methods: One hundred and eighteen patients aged over 65 years, admitted to acute medical wards at a teaching hospital, were interviewed in a standardised manner using relevant sections of the Present State Examination—Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry to identify depression according to ICD-10 criteria. Subsequently, participants completed the two depression screening questions and the 15-item version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15). Results: A threshold of one or more positive responses to the two NICE depression screening questions gave a sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 71%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 49% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 100%. The GDS-15 optimal cut-off was 6/7 with a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 86%, PPV of 62% and NPV of 94%. A two-stage screening process utilising the NICE two questions followed by the GDS-15 with these cut-offs gave a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 91%, PPV of 71% and NPV of 94%. Conclusion: The two depression questions perform well as an initial screening process for non-cognitively impaired older people in the acute medical setting. A positive response to either question would indicate that further assessment is required by a clinician competent in diagnosing depression in this population, or the possible use of a more detailed instrument such as the GDS-15 to reduce the number of false-positive cases. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Perceived challenges to the sustainability of community-based aging initiatives: findings from a National study of villages

Authors:
LEHNING Amanda, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 58(7-8), 2015, pp.684-702.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Concerns have been raised regarding the sustainability of villages, an expanding set of organizations that typically use a participant-directed approach to improve older adults’ quality of life and ability to age in place. Using online survey and telephone-interview data from a 2013 follow-up study of villages across the United States, this study examined organisational leaders' perceptions of the major challenges to sustainability. Major challenges identified included: (a) funding, (b) membership recruitment, (c) leadership development, (d) meeting members’ service needs, and (e) limitations of the village model itself. Findings point to a number of important considerations for the development, implementation, and sustainability of the village model, including the role of social workers in addressing these challenges. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Safeguarding older people from abuse: critical contexts to policy and practice

Author:
ASH Angie
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
200
Place of publication:
Bristol

The mistreatment of older people is increasingly recognised internationally as a significant abuse of elders’ human rights. Scandals and inquiries into the failure to protect older people from abuse in health and social care systems rarely address, and still less challenge, the social, economic and cultural context to the abuse of older people. This critical and challenging book makes a strong case for the development of ethically-driven, research-informed policy and practice to safeguard older people from abuse. Drawing on findings of original UK research and framed in an international context, it illustrates ways in which ageism, under-resourced services to older people, target-driven health and social care policy and services, and organisational cultures of blame and scapegoating, are a powerful yet invisible backcloth to elder abuse. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Does participation in home-delivered meals programs improve outcomes for older adults? Results of a systematic review

Authors:
CAMPBELL Anthony D., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Nutrition in Gerontology and Geriatrics, 34(2), 2015, pp.124-167.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Participation in home-delivered meals programs may contribute to the health and independence of older adults living in the community, especially those who are food insecure or those who are making transitions from acute, subacute, and chronic care settings to the home. A comprehensive and systematic review of all studies related to home-delivered meals was carried out in order to shed light on the state of the science. A complete review of articles appearing in PubMed using the keyword “Meal” was conducted; and titles, abstracts, and full-texts were screened for relevance. Included in this review are 80 articles. Most studies are descriptive and do not report on outcomes. Frequently reported outcomes included nutritional status based on self-reported dietary intake. Additionally, most studies included in this review are cross-sectional, have a small sample size, and/or are limited to a particular setting or participant population. More rigorous research is needed to (1) gain insight into why so few eligible older adults access home-delivered meals programs, (2) support expansion of home-delivered meals to all eligible older adults, (3) better identify what home-delivered meals models alone and in combination with other services works best and for whom, and (4) better target home-delivered meals programs where and when resources are scarce. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Learning from Trusted to Care: one year one

Authors:
WALES. Welsh Government, NHS WALES
Publisher:
Welsh Government
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
19
Place of publication:
Cardiff

Report summarising progress and improvements made in care and practice at the Princess of Wales and Neath Port Talbot Hospitals in Wales since the independent review Trusted to Care found serious concerns about the quality of care and patient safety of frail and older people. The review made 14 recommendations for the health board and four for the Welsh Government. The report finds progress has been made in all 14 recommendation areas made to the health board. Six have been completed either fully or there are clear plans for implementation in place Eight of the recommendations still need work. The report also identifies the progress made against the Welsh Government recommendations. Improvements are identified in the areas of hydration, medication, complaints and professional accountability. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Insights into loneliness, older people and wellbeing, 2015

Author:
THOMAS Jennifer
Publisher:
Office for National Statistics
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
Newport

This article focuses on older people's well-being, loneliness and some of the risk factors associated with loneliness such as living alone, housing tenure, marital status, ill health and support networks. The ONS Measuring National Well-being programme aims to produce accepted and trusted measures of the well-being of the nation - how the UK as a whole is doing. This analysis shows that older people are more satisfied with life generally and with their social networks and the support they provide. This may be due to having lower expectations due to a cohort effect or more mature perspectives but ultimately they are more content than their younger counterparts. However, the impact of loneliness on well-being is considerable, especially for the oldest old who are most likely to feel lonely and are subject to a high number of risk factors. The paper argues that the UK needs to consider how to minimise some of the impact that risk factors of loneliness has, particularly bereavement, poor health, and housing tenure. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Critical reflections from the millennials on the global action against dementia legacy events

Authors:
NEWMAN Kristine, BOOI Laura
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, 16(3), 2015, pp.177-182.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to share information regarding the Global Action Against Dementia Legacy, to critically reflect on the views of the Canadian Young Leaders of Dementia and to strengthen the impact of their voices in the global discussion surrounding dementia. Design/methodology/approach: This offers a critical reflection and review of the innovative intergenerational discussions and solutions offered by younger Canadians – specifically, the Millennial Generation. Findings: The paper provides insights about how change and solutions in dementia actions may be established through intergenerational collaboration. Research limitations/implications: Researchers are encouraged to make room for the voices of younger, less established generations in both discussions and research related to dementia. The younger generations will provide future direction to the Global Action Against Dementia Legacy so it is time to hear their voice too. Originality/value: This paper draws on developments in the Canadian context to highlight the potential of encouraging a less-usual, intergenerational approach to developing engagement, research and solutions in dementia. (Edited publisher abstract)

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