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Journal article

Preferences and expectations for delivering bad news among Korean older adults

Authors:
KO Eunjeong, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Service Research, 40(4), 2014, pp.402-414.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

To explore Korean older adults’ perspectives toward physicians’ disclosure of serious illness to patients, 70 Korean older adults residing in the community were interviewed in person using a semistructured interview guide. Major themes included conflicting desires among participants to: 1) inform the patient directly, 2) inform the patient indirectly, and 3) inform only the family. Subthemes under the first theme included: a) decision making about treatment, b) planning and preparation for the future, c) need for use of an ethical standard, d) consideration of patient coping responses, and e) disclosure of serious illness as a relational process. Disclosure of bad news is more than revealing or concealing information. Needs and preferences regarding to what extent and how information is delivered differ by culture. Thus, understanding preferred communication pathways for advanced care planning in specific cultural frameworks is important. Future studies using clear concepts and measures about serious illness disclosure can better prepare health care professionals in interacting with those from minority cultures. In addition, studies of those with poor health status from diverse cultural groups may further assist social workers to tailor interventions to accommodate cultural needs and expectations in end-of-life settings. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

What happens to the “hand that rocked the cradle”? a study of elderly abuse in India

Authors:
BHATTACHARYA Sonali, BHATTACHARYA Shubhaseesh
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adult Protection, 16(3), 2014, pp.166-179.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the possible causes of elderly abuse in India and its repercussions for the society, based on the real cases and reports. Design/methodology/approach: A multiple case study approach has been used for the study sourced from archival newspaper reports, crime reports, and narration. Findings: Greater vigilance and more effective legislation would be required to solve the problem related to elder abuse. Originality/value: There is not much study of causes, consequences, effectiveness of the legal system with respect to elderly abuse in India. In that way, it will be a unique contribution. (Publisher abstract)

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Ten top tips for becoming more inclusive of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people: a guide for services and organisations working with older people

Author:
LGBT HEALTH AND WELLBEING
Publisher:
LGBT Health and Wellbeing
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
23
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

An introduction to the issues that older LGBT people face, providing guidance on how to ensure services and organisations are responsive to their needs. Suggestions include: make sure LGBT people are visibly welcomed; avoid assumptions; ensure that staff receive LGBT awareness training; make sure that LGBT people’s safety and privacy is protected; create a Safe Space policy; engage with and respect LGBT people’s chosen families; monitor gender and sexual orientation across the organisation; link up with the LGBT communities in your local area; make sure your systems and procedures are LGBT inclusive; remember that not all LGBT people are the same. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Co-producing knowledge: reflections on the benefits and challenges of researching in partnership with voluntary sector organisations

Authors:
HOGG Eddy, HARDILL Irene, RAMSEY John
Journal article citation:
Voluntary Sector Review, 5(3), 2014, pp.399-406.
Publisher:
Policy Press
Place of publication:
Bristol

This practice paper explores the co-production of knowledge in a collaborative PhD studentship funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and Age UK, which examined the formal volunteering undertaken by older adults in England. Some third sector organisations, especially larger ones such as Age UK, are both producers and users of social science knowledge. The authors critically reflect on the co-production of knowledge, and the ways in which both student and supervisors experience the co-creation of knowledge. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Lessons from America

Authors:
SULLIVAN Mary Pat, MILNE Alisoun
Journal article citation:
Social Work Matters (e-Magazine), February 2014, Online only
Publisher:
The College of Social Work

As the population ages, the author argues there is a need to develop gerontologise social work and build the profession's capacity to improve care for older people and their families. The article draws on practice from the United States which demonstrate the effective contribution that social work plays in the care of older people. Details of the John A Hartford Geriatric Social Work Initiative in the United States is provided as a case study of a programme to promote cultural change in social work to ensure it is meeting the needs of an ageing society in terms of social work education, training and competency. (Original abstract)

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Discussion paper: one-to-one befriending programmes for older people

Author:
DEVINE Paula
Publisher:
ARK
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
16
Place of publication:
Belfast

Befriending programmes have been used as one of a range of initiatives to help combat loneliness and social isolation among older people. This discussion paper looks at how befriending services can be delivered face-to-face, by telephone (telefriending) and by email or internet (e-befriending). It then presents eight short case studies of alternative approaches and models developed across the world, in order to highlight the potential that different models can bring. The case studies include Hubs for Older People's Engagement (HOPE) in Belfast and an Enhanced befriending scheme in Tower Hamlets. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Older, not colder: why older people need warm homes

Author:
AGE UK
Publisher:
Age UK
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
31
Place of publication:
London

Sets out the range of problems that older people face in winter, looking specifically at fuel poverty, winter health and excess winter deaths. It focuses on the challenges faced by older people living in rural communities, including those of older residents of park homes. The document also examines specific problems with the energy market, such as understanding fuel bills and tariffs, costs for non-direct debit customers, prepayment meters and the Green Deal. It concludes that an ambitious energy efficiency programme to bring all housing up to standard is the only long-term solution to fuel poverty and winter health problems. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Post-traumatic stress disorder in older adults: a systematic review of the psychotherapy treatment literature

Authors:
DINNEN Stephanie, SIMIOLA Vanessa, COOK Joan M.
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 19(2), 2014, pp.144-150.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Objectives: This systematic review examined reports of psychological treatment for trauma-related problems, primarily post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in studies with samples of at least 50% adults aged 55 and older using standardised measures. Methods: The review of the literature was conducted on psychotherapy for PTSD with older adults using PubMed, Medline, PsychInfo, CINAHL, PILOTS, and Google Scholar.Results: A total of 42 studies were retrieved for full review; 22 were excluded because they did not provide at least one outcome measure or results were not reported by age in the case of mixed-age samples. Of the 20 studies that met review criteria, there were: 13 case studies or series, three uncontrolled pilot studies, two randomized clinical trials, one non-randomized concurrent control study and one post hoc effectiveness study. Significant methodological limitations in the current older adult PTSD treatment outcome literature were found reducing its internal validity and generalisability, including non-randomised research designs, lack of comparison conditions and small sample sizes.Conclusion: Select evidence-based interventions validated in younger and middle-aged populations appear acceptable and efficacious with older adults. There are few treatment studies on subsets of the older adult population including cultural and ethnic minorities, women, the oldest old (over 85), and those who are cognitively impaired. Implications for clinical practice and future research directions are discussed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

A validity and measurement equivalence study of the ultra-short suicidal ideation scale with older adults

Authors:
NUGENT William Robert, CUMMINGS Sherry
Journal article citation:
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research, 5(4), 2014, pp.439-459.
Publisher:
Society for Social Work and Research

Short-form scales are important tools for use in the assessment of suicide ideation and risk since their brevity makes them ideally suited for use in busy practice settings. This article reports results of a validity study of a short suicidal ideation scale (USSIS) used with an older adult population. The study tests the hypothesis that scores on the USSIS represent magnitude of sucidal thinking. The USSIS was used to gather data on more than 200 adults, ages 50 to 97 years, recruited from 2 clinical settings that serve older adults. Data are analysed to provide evidence from concurrent criterion, divergent, factorial, and known-groups discriminant validity. In addition, analyses was conducted to test measurement equivalence across the 2 study sites. Results are consistent with the scores on the USSIS representing magnitude of suicidal indeation, and with measurement equivalence across the study sites. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The provision of care for residents dying in UK nursing care homes

Authors:
KINLEY Julie, et al
Journal article citation:
Age and Ageing, 43(3), 2014, pp.375-379.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Objectives: To identify the care currently provided to residents dying in UK nursing care homes. Method: Study participants were residents who had died within 38 nursing care homes in southeast England over a 3-year period. The nursing care homes had been recruited to take part in a cluster randomised controlled trial looking at different models of facilitation while implementing the Gold Standards Framework in Care Homes (GSFCH) programme. Two researchers examined the notes and daily records of all residents who died in each of these homes between the 1 June 2008 and the 31 May 2011. Results: A total of 2,444 residents died during the 3-year period. Fifty-six percent of these residents died within a year of admission. The support from specialist healthcare services to residents during their last 6 months of life was variable. Conclusions: Nursing care homes have established links with some external healthcare providers. These links included the GP, palliative care nurses and physiotherapy. As dependency of resident increase with 56% residents dying within a year of admission these links need to be expanded. The provision of health care that meets the needs of future nursing care home residents needs to be ‘proactively’ obtained rather than left to chance.

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