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Journal article

Elder abuse: a systematic review of risk factors in community-dwelling elders

Authors:
JOHANNESEN Mark, LoGIUDICE Dina
Journal article citation:
Age and Ageing, 42(3), 2013, pp.292-298.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Objective: To undertake a systematic literature review of risk factors for abuse in community-dwelling elders, as a first step towards exploring the clinical utility of a risk factor framework. Search strategy and selection criteria: A search was undertaken using the MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and PsycINFO databases for articles published in English up to March 2011, to identify original studies with statistically significant risk factors for abuse in community-dwelling elders. Studies concerning self-neglect and persons aged under 55 were excluded. Results: Forty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria, with 13 risk factors being reproducible across a range of settings in high-quality studies. These concerned the elder person (cognitive impairment, behavioural problems, psychiatric illness or psychological problems, functional dependency, poor physical health or frailty, low income or wealth, trauma or past abuse and ethnicity), perpetrator (caregiver burden or stress, and psychiatric illness or psychological problems), relationship (family disharmony, poor or conflictual relationships) and environment (low social support and living with others except for financial abuse). Conclusions: Current evidence supports the multifactorial aetiology of elder abuse involving risk factors within the elder person, perpetrator, relationship and environment. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social and custodial needs of older adults in prison

Authors:
HAYES Adrian J., et al
Journal article citation:
Age and Ageing, 42(5), 2013, pp.589-593.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Background: Older prisoners are a fast-growing group but there is limited evidence for how well their needs are being met. Objectives: To quantify the social and custodial needs of older prisoners and suggest improvements for service provision. Design: cross-sectional study. Setting: twelve prisons holding adult males in North West England. Subjects: Two hundred and sixty-two prisoners; 97 aged between 50 and 59, 165 aged 60 and over. Methods: interview and case-note review for issues of social and custodial need and quality of life in prison, including Forensic Camberwell Assessment of Need and Lubben Scale for social networks. Results: Many had problems mixing with younger prisoners, accommodation and activities, and limited contact with friends and family. A small group had personal care needs which were not well managed in prison. Conclusion: Older prisoners have distinct social and custodial needs which need to be addressed by a national strategy for their care and management. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Transitions in caregiving: evaluating a person-centered approach to supporting family caregivers in the community

Authors:
SUNDAR Vidyalakshmi, FOX Susan W., PHILLIPS Kimberly G.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 56(6-7), 2013, pp.750-765.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Caregivers of older adults provide a wide range of informal supports and services that enable older adults to continue living in the community. This study describes the use of a multicomponent intervention combined with a person-centered approach to assist caregivers of older adults in the community. Four hundred and eighteen caregiver and care recipient dyads participated in this study and their outcomes related to burden, depression, well-being, and care recipient functional status were evaluated. The findings suggest that adult child and spousal caregivers experience burden differently. Programs designed to support caregivers must tailor services to the unique needs of adult child and spousal caregivers. (Publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Working together with older people

Authors:
UNIVERSITY OF BRIGHTON, AGE UK BRIGHTON AND HOVE
Publishers:
University of Brighton, Age UK Brighton & Hove
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
6 minutes 46 seconds
Place of publication:
Brighton

One of six films made as part of an ESRC funded participatory research project which explored what well-being means to older people and how it is generated. The research was carried out by a team of older people, university researchers and a voluntary sector manager. In this film the older people who took part in this research reflect on their experiences. The researchers discuss what they learnt about working with older people to do this research and suggest that this is useful in other contexts where groups of older people come together and share their experience and knowledge to shape services. The film is a scripted scenario based on interviews. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Moving stories: evaluation of an MSW experiential learning project on aging and diversity

Authors:
MASCHI Tina, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work Education, 49(3), 2013, pp.461-475.
Publisher:
Council on Social Work Education

This study consists of an oral history project that partnered MSW students with community dwelling older adults from diverse backgrounds. It used a comparison group with a pretest and posttest design and a sample of 74 MSW students to evaluate changes in their confidence levels, future plans of working with older adults, and geriatric competencies. Results of MANOVAs revealed that participation in the oral history project was significantly related to future career plans, confidence about working with diverse older adults, and geriatric competencies related to diversity, particularly for the experimental group. Exposing social work students to a broad-based curriculum with aging content has important implications toward fostering students’ interests in pursuing social work practice with older adults and in preparing them for culturally competent social work. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Increasing older adults' benefits from institutional capacity of volunteer programs

Authors:
HONG Song-Iee, MORROW-HOWELL Nancy
Journal article citation:
Social Work Research, 37(2), 2013, pp.99-108.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

This study examines the extent to which the institutional capacity of volunteer programs explained variations in older adults' self-perceived psychosocial benefits. This quantitative study analysed 401 older adults serving in 13 volunteer programs across the United States. Individual volunteer-level characteristics (sociodemographics and volunteer experience) and program-level characteristics (flexibility, recognition, incentives) were collected. Program directors provided information about program characteristics via telephone interviews, and older volunteers in those programs completed mailed surveys. Variation in perceived benefits was associated with both individual- and program-level factors. Of six dimensions of institutional capacity, role flexibility and recognition had significant associations with higher levels of benefits reported by the volunteers. Also, incentives in the form of monetary compensation, like for petol or meals, offered by programs increased the benefits from volunteering. These findings suggest that characteristics of programs can maximize the benefits that older adults gain from volunteering. Therefore, public policies and program development that increase the institutional capacity of volunteer programs are warranted. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The effectiveness of dyadic interventions for people with dementia and their caregivers

Authors:
MOON Heehyul, ADAMS Kathryn Betts
Journal article citation:
Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 12(6), 2013, pp.821-839.
Publisher:
Sage

To review the effects of dyadic interventions on caregivers and care recipients in the early stages of dementia searches were carried out on four databases (AgeLine, Medline, EBSCO, and PyscINFO) and relevant literature from 2000 onwards reviewed. The twelve studies identified used a variety of intervention approaches including support group, counseling, cognitive stimulation, skill training, and notebook-keeping. This review suggests that intervention programs for early-stage dementia caregiving dyads were feasible and well accepted by participants. The reviewed studies provided rich evidence of the significance of mutual understanding and communication to partners’ well-being and relationship quality within the caregiving process. The findings suggest that these intervention approaches improved cognitive function of the care recipients, social relations, and the relationship between the primary caregivers and the care recipients, although evidence of long-term effectiveness is lacking. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Protective and risk factors associated with stigma in a population of older adults living with HIV in Ontario, Canada

Authors:
EMLET Charles A., et al
Journal article citation:
AIDS Care, 25(10), 2013, pp.1330-1339.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Although the deleterious effects of HIV stigma are well documented, less is known about how various types of stigma impact older adults living with HIV disease and what factors exacerbate or lessen the effects of HIV stigma. Using cross-sectional data from the OHTN cohort study (OCS), we undertook multiple linear regression to determine the predictors of overall HIV stigma, and enacted, anticipated, and internalised stigma subscales in a sample of OCS participants age 50 and over (n=378). Being female, heterosexual, engaging in maladaptive coping, and having poor self-rated health were associated with greater overall stigma while being older, having greater mastery, increased emotional-informational social support, and a longer time since HIV diagnosis were associated with lower levels of stigma. The final model accounted for 31% of the variance in overall stigma. Differences in these findings by subscale and implications for practice are discussed. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social workers as research psychotherapists in an investigation of cognitive–behavioral therapy among rural older adults

Authors:
SHAH Avani, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work Research, 37(2), 2013, pp.137-145.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Reports on the treatment fidelity of in-home cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered by a sample of clinically trained, master's-level social workers to a group of primarily rural, medically frail older adults in the United States as part of the Project to Enhance Aged Rural Living (PEARL) clinical trial. The social workers in this study received brief didactic and experiential CBT training. Audiotaped sessions were randomly selected and evaluated by independent reviewers. Results showed that the social workers adequately delivered CBT as measured by the Cognitive Therapy Scale. Older adult participants also evidenced pre- posttreatment improvements, suggesting that the social workers' delivery of CBT facilitated improvement. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Falls in older people with sight loss: a review of emerging research and key action points

Author:
THOMAS POCKLINGTON TRUST
Publisher:
Thomas Pocklington Trust
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

Draws on recent research to summarise what is known about falls and falls prevention amongst older people with sight loss. It explores the implications of research findings for action to address and reduce the risk of falls among older people with sight loss and suggests key issues for health and social care professionals to consider when working with older people, many of whom may have sight loss, and for sight loss specialists to consider when addressing individuals’ risks of falls. (Publisher abstract)

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