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Book

Government's pre-consultation: the case for change: why England needs a new care and support system

Authors:
HARROP Andrew, THOMPSON Pauline, LOWE Stephen
Publisher:
Age Concern England
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
London

Key points and recommendations are followed by an introduction, a description of the state of the debate at the end of 2008, and detailed discussion of three questions: What more do we need to do to make our vision of independence, choice and control a reality?; What should the balance of responsibility be between the family, the individual and the government; and Should the system be the same for everybody or should we consider varying the ways we allocate government funding according to certain principles?

Book

Find the right care home: a step-by-step companion

Authors:
HURTLEY Rosemary, JONES Julia Burton
Publisher:
Age Concern England
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
192p.
Place of publication:
London

This book guides the reader step-by-step through the process of finding the right care home for a loved one.

Journal article

The prevalence of anxiety in older adults: methodological issues and a review of the literature

Authors:
BRYANT Christina, JACKSON Henry, AMES David
Journal article citation:
Journal of Affective Disorders, 109(3), 2008, pp.233-250.
Publisher:
Elsevier

A systematic review of literature on anxiety in people over 60, published between 1980 and 2007, finds prevalence rates for anxiety disorders of 1.2% to 15% in community settings, and 1% to 28% in clinical settings. The prevalence of anxiety symptoms is much higher, ranging from 15% to 52.3% in community samples, and 15% to 56% in clinical samples. These discrepancies are partly attributable to conceptual and methodological inconsistencies in the literature. The review finds that Generalised Anxiety Disorder is the most common anxiety disorder among older people, but issues relating to co-morbidity and the nature of anxiety in old age remain unresolved. This hampers the design of interventions and highlights the need for further research with a primary focus on anxiety.

Book Full text available online for free

Improving care for older people: good practice examples

Author:
SOCIAL WORK INSPECTION AGENCY
Publisher:
Social Work Inspection Agency
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
10p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This paper sets out a range of good practice examples of services for older people, including people with dementia, which were seen during performance inspections of 18 local authority social work services in Scotland to end of December 2007.

Book Full text available online for free

Teaching and learning human growth and development in social work education: older people

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, LE RICHE Pat, BOUSHEL Margaret, SHARLAND Elaine
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
68p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

SCIE’s latest knowledge review examines social work teaching on human growth and development with regard to older people, looking particularly at what promotes or hinders successful learning outcomes. Teaching on human growth and development is a central requirement of qualifying social work education and the focus on older people is particularly relevant as we improve our policies and practice in response to an ageing population.

Book Full text available online for free

SCIE research briefing 28: assistive technology and older people

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, BEECH Roger, ROBERTS Diane
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
11p.
Place of publication:
London

The term ‘assistive technology’ incorporates a wide variety of devices. Assistive technology can be supportive, preventive or responsive. The increasing proportion of older people in the population makes the use of assistive technology an attractive option in social services. Perceptions vary as to whether or not assistive technology has sufficient benefits. Existing research supports the greater use of assistive technology but further evaluation and ‘local learning’ is needed. The views and needs of people using assistive technology need to be taken into account.

Book Full text available online for free

Medication in extra care housing

Author:
OPUS PHARMACY SERVICES
Publisher:
Care Services Improvement Partnership. Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
London

The handling of medicines in Extra Care Housing (ECH) can be difficult to manage because of a lack of guidance relating specifically to this particular environment. Care homes are completely different from extra care housing. A comparable model of care is a domiciliary care agency. If personal care is provided within an ECH scheme, this must be provided by a registered provider, hence the Care Standards Act 2000, National Minimum Standards for Domiciliary Care and the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) published guidance are all relevant. Any support with medication should incorporate the principles of safe practice set out in the guidance published by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain ‘The Handling of Medicines in Social Care’. This factsheet is aimed at practitioners, commissioners, care services managers and housing managers in extra care housing, an environment not specifically referred to in any guidance on the handling of medicines.

Journal article

Representations of elderly with mental health problems held by psychosocial practitioners from community and institutional settings

Authors:
DALLAIRE Bernadette, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Mental Health, 7(1-3), 2008, pp.139-152.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This article begins by providing an overview of the prevalence of mental health problems  among people aged 65 and older, the specific situations and needs of this population, and the services provided to them. It then briefly discusses three trends in psychosocial interventions, that is practices oriented toward recovery, empowerment, and social integration are then reviewed.. Finally, the article looks at the cumulative impacts of social representations of aging and the aged and of mental illness and the mentally ill, and how they can impede the implementation of interventions, services and programs based on recovery, empowerment and social integration approaches.

Journal article

Involvement in voluntary organizations: how older adults access volunteer roles?

Authors:
TANG Fengyan, MORROW-HOWELL Nancy
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 51(3-4), 2008, pp.210-227.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This article examines the potential role for older volunteers in the light of the growing demand for social services and diminishing public funding, and looks at the type of people who become volunteers. US Census data is analysed and older volunteers were found to be likely to be in employment, have fewer household members, and were more likely to volunteer firstly for religious organisations, followed by social service, health and educational institutions. The article also examines how social workers recruit and work with these volunteers who are becoming an increasingly valuable resource.

Journal article

Hardiness, successful aging, and HIV: implications for social work

Authors:
VANCE David E., STRUZICK Thomas C., MASTEN James
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 51(3-4), 2008, pp.260-283.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Ageing with HIV is becoming and important public health issue and a topic for investigation in the US because the number of middle-aged and older people with HIV is increasing. This is due to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) which is extending the lifespan of many infected, and also due to infection in later life. Little research is being done on the synergistic effects of ageing with HIV, most studies being concerned with mortality. This article reviews various studies which look at the physical, psychological and social benefits associated with hardiness and successful ageing which can mitigate the effects of HIV-related problems, and suggests strategies to improve hardiness and facilitate successful ageing.

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