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Journal article Full text available online for free

Memory Banks

Author:
KELLY Des
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 4.12.03, 2003, p.40.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

A Liverpool museum is turning the memories of older people into a resource and social care programme with outreach projects and activities. Reports on the City Memories Project.

Journal article

Determinants of stability and changes in self-reported Work disability among older working-age populations

Author:
CHOI Namkee G.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Aging and Social Policy, 15(1), 2003, pp.11-31.
Publisher:
Routledge
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Data from the Health and Retirement Study, 1992-1994, were used to analyse: the prevalence and incidence of self-reported work disability among older working-age populations over a two-year period, and the effect of the stability/changes in physical and functional health conditions, controlling for socioeconomic and occupational characteristics, on the stability/changes in self-reported work ability/disability. Findings show a high rate of transitions into and out of work-disabled status over the two-year period. Findings also show that, although objective physical and functional health problems and low self-ratings of health at wave 1 were significant determinants of self-reported work disability at wave 1, most subsequent changes in objective physical and functional health conditions over the two-year period were not significantly associated with the changes in self-report of work disability between wave 1 and wave 2. Especially, improved health conditions were not significantly associated with regained work ability between the two waves. Of the demographic variables, female gender significantly increased the likelihood of reporting work disability at wave 2, and being Black or Hispanic significantly decreased the likelihood of reporting regained work ability at wave 2. Research and policy implications of the findings are discussed. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street Binghamton, NY 13904-1580)

Book Full text available online for free

Scoping study of older people in rural Scotland (full text)

Authors:
PHILIP Lorna, et al
Publisher:
The Stationery Office
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
120p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Book Full text available online for free

Scoping study of older people in rural Scotland (summary)

Authors:
PHILIP Lorna, et al
Publisher:
The Stationery Office
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article

Formal support, mental disorders and personal characteristics: a 25-year follow-up study of a total cohort of older people

Authors:
SAMUELSSON G., et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 11(2), March 2003, pp.95-102.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study was designed to describe the pattern of long-term formal support received by people with mental disorders and to investigate the relationship between the medical, psychological and social characteristics of the participants and types of formal support, based on a cohort of 192 people born in 1902 and 1903 in a community in Southern Sweden. They were assessed using interviews, psychological tests and medical examinations. Information was collected about the use of primary healthcare and social services. The first assessment took place when the cohort was aged 67 and on 8 further occasions until they were 92. Participation ranged from 72% to 100%. During the observation period of 25 years, 53% of people with dementia eventually received both home help and institutional care compared to 34% with other psychiatric diagnoses and 12% with good mental health. The last group all had physical health problems and/or problems with activities of daily living. However, 35% of the dementia group, 46% with other psychiatric diagnoses and 52% with good mental health received no formal support. Males and self-employed people were significantly less likely to use formal support. The institutionalised group reported loneliness significantly more often than the other 2. In a logistic regression analysis, loneliness, low social class, high blood pressure and low problem-solving ability were predictors of formal support use. People with mental disorder, including dementia, were significantly more likely to use formal support compared with people with good mental health. Social factors were the main factors predicting formal support.

Journal article

Institutionnalisation des personnes agees: les representations socialies et leurs impacts

Author:
BICKERSTAFF Julie
Journal article citation:
Canadian Social Work Review, 20(2), 2003, pp.227-241.
Publisher:
Canadian Association for Social Work Education

Following the social transformation introduced by the industrial revolution, institutionalisation became the norm for sheltering and "managing" various groups, such as orphans or indigents, in modern society. The elderly, too, have experienced various forms of institutionalisation. As has been the case, to varying degrees, for institutionalisation of the mentally ill or orphans, institutionalisation of the elderly is socially viewed in a very negative light. This general perception, which covers institutionalisation of the elderly with a veil of fear, shame and guilt, has major consequences for all parties involved. To the extent that such serious negative images persist, this type of care will always be excessively agonising for both the elderly and their families. [Article in French].

Book

Guidelines for meeting national minimum care standards: care homes for older people

Author:
BORDESLEY INSTITUTE
Publisher:
Bordesley Institute
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
92p.
Place of publication:
Birmingham

Any organisation who owns or manages a care home is to undertake a Section 26 visit under the National Minimum Care Standards. Following the visits reports are produced and copies sent to the care home and to CSCI. Residential care is about providing an individual with a safe, warm, secure, homely environment. Although current trends are towards people remaining in their own home to maintain independence and to continue within their own community, for many people residential care is quite often a positive choice where they can receive a high quality standard of life supported by residential care.

Book

Living well in later life: from prevention to promotion

Authors:
WISTOW Gerald, WADDINGTON Eileen, GODFREY Mary
Publisher:
University of Leeds. Nuffield Institute for Health
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
Leeds

This report argues for a switch in emphasis from avoiding higher intensity and more costly care to promoting older people's quality of life and their engagement in the community.

Book Full text available online for free

Supplementary guidance for older people with dementia

Author:
CARE STANDARDS INSPECTORATE FOR WALES
Publisher:
Care Standards Inspectorate for Wales
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
21p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This supplementary guidance to the National Minimum Standards for Care Homes for Older People provides additional advice to inspectors when interpreting the relevant standards for people with dementia. It is not the intention of this guidance to replace or amend any particular standard. It does however take into account the Care Standards Act, associated regulations, NMS and relevant good practice literature.

Book

Promoting independence: candidate handbook: S/NVQ level 3

Author:
NOLAN Yvonne
Publisher:
Heinemann
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
360p.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Candidates can now take a specialist route through their NVQ in order to work with the elderly or those with special needs. This title is specially written for these candidates. The title covers 5 mandatory units of the award and 10 of the option units, providing students with a choice in their selection of option units. Case studies encourage candidates to apply their learning in the context of the type of work they will be doing, whilst "Check It Out" sections aim to help candidates build on their own experiences and give them confidence in their work. "Test Yourself" sections ensure candidates understand all the theory they have learnt. "Active Knowledge" tasks help candidates to apply the theory in their own place of work.

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