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Journal article

Low claims bonus

Author:
COHEN Phil
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 6.12.96, 1996, p.14.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The Treasury is benefiting from the extremely low take-up of benefits among older people. Argues some of this bonus should be ploughed back into making sure people receive what they are entitled to, rather than pursuing alleged benefits fiddlers.

Journal article

The family and ageing in Korea: a new concern and challenge

Author:
CHOI Sung-Jae
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 16(1), January 1996, pp.1-25.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Many changes in familial factors under the influence of modernisation have limited the Korean family's function or capability to support and care for elderly members, and are contributing to the problems of ageing. Ageing as a social problem is a new concern in Korea which has never been experienced before, and a new challenge to the family and the state. Problems associated with current policies are discussed and recommendations for future development are made.

Book

Acts of faith: a study of older people and their places of worship

Authors:
CHESTER Rosie, SMITH Jef
Publisher:
Counsel and Care
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
55p.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Age and employment: why employers should think again about older workers

Author:
WORSLEY Richard
Publisher:
Age Concern
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
160p.,list of orgs.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Comprehensive review of employers' policies and practices on employment of older workers.

Book Full text available online for free

Attitudes towards long-term care for elderly people: evidence submitted to the health committee

Authors:
PARKER Gillian, CLARKE Harriet
Publisher:
University of Leicester. Nuffield Community Care Studies Unit
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
50p
Place of publication:
Leicester

Much of the debate about the provision of long-term care for elderly people and who should be responsible for it has taken place in a vacuum of information about the options for different forms of provision, their costs, and their feasibility. Most importantly, reearchers know neither what the public at large believes to be the correct balance between the state, the family and the individual in relation to providing or paying for care for older people, nor if and how those beliefs are translated into action. It is this gap that this research is attempting to fill. This paper presents preliminary analysis of data collected during a national survey of attitudes and beliefs about long-term care in old age. This survey is the first stage of the project; the second stage will involve detailed interviews with a smaller sample of people and will explore their actual behaviour against the attitudes they expressed in the first stage.

Journal article

Tracing the course of theoretical development in the sociology of aging

Authors:
LYNOTT Robert J., LYNOTT Patricia Passuth
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 36(6), December 1996, pp.749-760.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

The purpose of this article is to trace the course of theoretical development in the sociology of ageing as a sequence of two transformations in gerontological thinking.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Post-reform community care for elderly people: who gets how much of what service?

Authors:
DAVIES Bleddyn, FERNANDEZ Jose, WARBURTON Raymond
Journal article citation:
Care Plan, 3(2), December 1996, pp.25-30.
Publisher:
Positive Publications/ Anglia Polytechnic University, Faculty of Health and Social Work

Evaluates community care reforms in terms of services for older people and how well they are targeted. Looks at the issues relating to the effects on the services and the cost implications.

Journal article

The burden of aging: a theoretical framework for understanding the shifting balance of caregiving and care receiving as cohorts age

Author:
UHLENBERG Peter
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 36(6), December 1996, pp.761-767.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

Unless changes occur in the way cohorts age, the future aging of the population will make the burden of caring for older persons an increasingly salient political issue in American society. There is no reason, however, why aging in the future should replicate the pattern of aging that currently exists. A helpful step toward understanding what social changes would reduce the burden that aging cohorts place on society is the development of aging theory. This article develops a theoretical framework that explicates factors determining the level of care given and care received by cohorts moving through different stages of later life.

Journal article

Cross-cultural perspectives: toward an integrated theory of elder abuse

Author:
TRUSCOTT Deborah J.
Journal article citation:
Policy Studies, 17(4), December 1996, pp.287-298.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Due to the use of unrepresentative samples, the absence of general agreement on the definition of elder abuse, and a general lack of theoretical integration, the prolific knowledge we have of the concept of elder abuse tells us little about the prevalence or about cultural differences in the social context, construction, and individual expression of elder abuse. This article argues that current conceptions of elder abuse originate with health and social services professionals in Canada and North American, who export their 'authoritative knowledge' to health and social services professionals in other countries and societies. Beyond the problems involved in definition it considers the questions and issues that must be addressed in developing an integrative theoretical framework within which to interpret elder abuse.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Against modernism

Author:
WILSON Gail
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 6(4), December 1996, pp.8-9.
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

Modernity can be defined as a way of organising knowledge which treats rationality and scientific method as the ultimate authorities. Demography and economics are part of modernity. However, the knowledge they offer about ageing is usually presented in simplistic and inaccurate forms. In the light of this the author argues against a modernist approach.

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