Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 10

Book

Family care of the elderly: social and cultural changes

Editor:
KOSBERG Jordan I.
Publisher:
Sage
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
329p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Newbury Park, CA

Takes a global look at care for older people within the family circle, and compares and contrasts global changes in the last decade.

Journal article

The development of culturally-sensitive measures for research on ageing

Author:
INGERSOLL-DAYTON Berit
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 31(3), April 2011, pp.355-370.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This article examines the problem of importing existing measures developed in other countries when creating research instruments for use with older people. These measures often fail to address any cultural aspects present. The article discusses a mixed-methods approach to measurement that incorporates input from older adults in Thailand for whom the measure is intended. Using 44 people in 5 focus groups and 23 in-depth interviews, the process begins with an identification of the culturally-meaningful domains of the construct under study. Then, input is gathered from other studies, before a preliminary quantitative measure is developed. Finally, the measure is reviewed by a panel of experts. Based on further pre-testing and cognitive interviews with older people, the measure is again modified. Subsequently, the measure is incorporated into a large-scale survey and tested for its psychometric qualities. In addition to providing a template for culturally-sensitive measurement development in gerontology, this article also examines issues that researchers should consider when attempting the development of such measures.

Journal article

Identifying vulnerable older people: insights from Thailand

Author:
LLOYD-SHERLOCK Peter
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 26(1), January 2006, pp.81-103.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This paper explores the usefulness of the ‘asset vulnerability framework’, as devised by Moser (1998), for assessing the economic wellbeing of older people living in poor rural and urban communities in Thailand. The paper shows the limitations and potential biases of assessments based purely on reported income levels. It then sets out the key principles of the asset vulnerability framework, which seeks to combine information about exposure to different economic risks with the relative capacity to deal with them. Drawing on survey data, the paper maps resilience to economic risk, finding that the very old and those living in rural communities are in the most precarious position, whereas gender differences are less apparent. The asset vulnerability framework is then applied to specific forms of risk: catastrophic health expenditure and the death of a child caused by HIV/AIDS. Patterns of vulnerability revealed by the framework roughly accord with those revealed by reported income, but there are important differences, such as the size of the vulnerability gap between rural and urban populations.

Journal article

Measuring psychological well-being: insights from Thai elders

Authors:
INGERSOLL-DAYTON Berit, et al
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 44(5), October 2004, pp.596-604.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

Psychological well-being, an important indicator of successful aging, may be conceptualized quite differently across cultures. Using a mixed-methods approach, we developed a measure of psychological well-being based on the indigenous expertise of Thai elders. Data were collected from older people in Thailand in four stages with staggered qualitative and quantitative methods: individual and focus group interviews (n = 67); a preliminary survey (n = 477); cognitive interviews (n = 30); and a second survey (n = 460). We analyzed the resulting psychological well-being items to identify their underlying factor structure and psychometric properties. Confirmatory factor analysis suggested that psychological well-being has two components: intrapersonal and interpersonal. The subscales for this measure have adequate reliability and validity. This research provides evidence for cultural variability in the nature of psychological well-being and highlights the importance of developing measures that are culturally relevant.

Journal article

Etic and emic perspectives on aging across four countries: Italy, Thailand, Botswana, and the United States

Authors:
KARLIN Nancy J., et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing International, 39(4), 2014, pp.348-368.
Publisher:
Springer
Place of publication:
New York

Elders’ experiences while ageing in place were obtained as part of an effort to develop a typology of emic (culture-specific) and etic (universal) models of ageing. Data came from interviews with older adults in Italy, Thailand, Botswana, and the United States. Analysis of variance was used to examine similarities and differences in the samples. Comparing country data from the four collection sites, similarities were indicated for participants’ marital status, and having children and grandchildren. Differences were evident for the number of children and grandchildren, level of reported health and happiness, overall satisfaction with life, type of pension received, whether benefits are sufficient, the availability of extra revenue, and the number of daily and weekly activities indicated. Findings highlight the diverse cross-national ageing experience of elders in this study. As worldwide demographic change leads to older populations and there are shifts in societal norms (in family involvement in caregiving, health care, and policy development), there is a dire need to understand how these changes impact elders at emic (culture/country-specific) and etic (universal) levels. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A counseling intervention for caregivers: effect on neuropsychiatric symptoms

Authors:
SENANARONG Vorapun, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 19(8), August 2004, pp.781-788.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

In Thailand, family caregivers have an important role in delivering care to patients with dementia. Most patients with dementia in Thailand and also in Western societies live in the community. Training caregivers may improve care of dementia patients. The authors performed a treatment study of a six-month caregiver intervention with group counseling and support with provision of techniques to cope with non-cognitive symptoms of patients with dementia. They hypothesized that this caregiver intervention with group counseling and support would reduce behavioral and neuropsychiatric symptoms in the demented patients. They conducted a parallel group intervention study. A manual for group counseling and support was developed focusing on education regarding dementia, behavioral analysis and intervention, and environmental adaptation. Fifty nonprofessional caregivers - 25 from the control group and 25 from the study group - of patients with dementia from the memory clinic at Siriraj Hospital were alternately assigned to each group as they presented to the clinic if they met the inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. The Thai Mental State Examination (TMSE) was used to assess dementia severity. Forty-five minute counseling sessions were conducted every 6-8 weeks for 6 months and assessments were conducted at 3 months and 6 months. The primary outcome measure was the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). A paired samples analysis of the NPI scores demonstrated a significant change of the total NPI scores at the end of six month from baseline in the intervention group (P = 0.045). Change from baseline of the comparison group was not significant. There was a trend towards improvement of the TMSE scores between the two groups at month six (p = 0.061). The result favored the treatment group. This study provided evidence of the utility of a non-pharmacologic intervention using group counseling in an out-patient setting for caregivers of patients with dementia.

Journal article

Gender and wellbeing among older people: evidence from Thailand

Authors:
SOBIESZCZYK Teresa, KNODEL John, CHAYOVAN Napaporn
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 23(6), November 2003, pp.701-735.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Researchers and international organisations frequently suggest that older women are disadvantaged in comparison with older men. This analysis of census and survey data from Thailand, however, indicates a far more complex association between gender and various aspects of ageing. Through an examination of various demographic, economic, psychosocial and health variables, it is found that older Thai women do face certain disadvantages compared to their male counterparts, including lower education and literacy, far higher levels of widowhood and living alone, and a lower likelihood of receiving formal retirement benefits. Older Thai men, however, also face relative disadvantages, including worse survivorship, a lower likelihood of receiving money from adult children, a greater probability of debt and other financial problems, and lower satisfaction with their financial situation. Many other demographic, psychosocial and economic measures are not significantly associated with gender. This analysis provides some support for a lifecourse perspective, that relates gender differences in old age to differences in earlier life experiences, roles and reward structures, particularly access to retirement pensions and the type of support older men and women provide for their co-resident children. Marital status often mediates gender differences in wellbeing among older people. The study concludes with research and policy recommendations.

Journal article

Formal social protection for older people in developing countries: three different approaches

Author:
LLOYD-SHERLOCK Peter
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Policy, 31(4), October 2002, pp.695-713.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Place of publication:
Cambridge

This article examines social protection for older people in three middle-income countries: Argentina, Thailand and South Africa. It focuses on income support, health services and the provision of care, as well as considering the effects of these policies on social exclusion. The paper locates each country's different social protection programmes within a broader welfare regime model. It finds an interesting variety of approaches to pension and health provision, which range from generous universalism to minimal means-testing. However, it finds much less innovation in areas such as long-term care and intermediary services. The article challenges generalisations about old age social protection in developing countries, and argues that the different experiences of these three countries could provide useful lessons for social protection in many parts of the world.

Book

Elderly care: a world perspective

Editor:
TOUT Ken
Publisher:
Chapman and Hall
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
240p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Contains examples of successful service provision for older people from 40 countries. The case studies are organised into the following sections: care at home; community support; empowerment; participation; fitness and well-being; income generation; environment; integrated services; mental health; training for elder care; organisation of services; and older women.

Book

Rivers of pain, bridges of hope: a selection of articles

Author:
DAVIS Leonard
Publisher:
Writers' and Publishers' Cooperative
Publication year:
1987
Pagination:
329p.
Place of publication:
Hong Kong

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts