Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 44

Journal article

The family and ageing in Korea: a new concern and challenge

Author:
CHOI Sung-Jae
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 16(1), January 1996, pp.1-25.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Many changes in familial factors under the influence of modernisation have limited the Korean family's function or capability to support and care for elderly members, and are contributing to the problems of ageing. Ageing as a social problem is a new concern in Korea which has never been experienced before, and a new challenge to the family and the state. Problems associated with current policies are discussed and recommendations for future development are made.

Journal article

Willingness to use formal long-term care services by Korean elders and their primary caregivers

Authors:
KIM Hyungsoo, CHOI Won-Young
Journal article citation:
Journal of Aging and Social Policy, 20(4), 2008, pp.474-492.
Publisher:
Routledge
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Logistic regression models were estimated using 2001 national survey data on 1,168 Korean adults aged 65 or older, and their primary caregivers. More than 70% of the older people were female, mostly with very low levels of formal education, and the majority lived with adult children or spouses. The attitudes of both older people and primary caregivers towards care responsibility were the dominant predictor of willingness to use formal long term care services. These attitudes need to be taken into account as policy makers attempt to normalise the use of formal care (home-based or institutional) and reduce the burden on informal carers. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Usefulness of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in the Korean elderly population

Authors:
JO Sangmee Ahn, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 22(3), March 2007, pp.218-223.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic validity of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in the elderly and to suggest an optimal cut-off score in order to screen major depressive disorder. The BDI and an elderly health questionnaire were administered to 2729 subjects over the age of 60 chosen by stratified random sampling in a Ansan City, South Korea. The BDI and geriatric depression scale (GDS) were examined at about a two-year interval. A reliability and validity test, a factor analysis and an ROC curve analysis were performed. Eighty-four subject had depression and 2645 subjects were rated as normal. The BDI showed significant positive internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Convergent validity with GDS was significantly positive, and an exploratory factor analysis revealed four factors. The authors suggest a score of 16 as the optimal cut-off point for the BDI when screening for major depression. The results of this study showed that the Korean version of the BDI is appropriate for screening for depression and 16 is the optimal cut-off score for the Korean elderly. Screening of elderly depression with BDI in the community would be valuable when comparing with younger adults and with their former BDI data which were taken when they were young.

Journal article

Does arm length indicate cognitive and functional reserve?

Authors:
JEONG Seul-Ki, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20(5), May 2005, pp.406-412.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study aimed to examine whether arm length and height were associated with cognitive and functional abilities. Screening interviews were conducted in 235 community dwelling individuals aged 65 and over. The assessment scales included the Korean version of modified Mini-Mental State Examination (K-mMMSE) for cognition, and the Korean Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (K-IADL) for functional ability. All the participants were examined clinically and a diagnosis of dementia was ascertained. Anthropometric measurements included total arm span and height. Both arm length and height correlated significantly with the cognitive and functional scales. In the multivariate regression models, their associations were significant, independent of age, sex, education, and other variables. Shorter arm length was also significantly associated with dementia; while, height lost significance after an adjustment for the potential confounders. Arm length and height could indicate cognitive and functional ability. Arm length, which was known to be less prone to degenerative processes, might be more stable as an indicator for cognitive and functional reserve capacity than height.

Journal article

Marital violence among Korean elderly couples: a cultural residue

Authors:
KIM Jae Yop, SUNG Kyu-taik
Journal article citation:
Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, 13(4), 2001, pp.73-89.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This study examined the prevalence of marital violence among Korean elderly couples based on data from a national sample. Wife abuse was the most frequently manifested form of marital violence. Findings suggest that wife abuse has become a serious problem. Socioeconomic factors were not associated with wife abuse, suggesting that it was a universal phenomenon among Korean elderly males, not specific to a certain social class or group. Influences of traditional male-centered culture are suggested to be a major factor causing this serious lingering problem. Cultural traits associated with wife abuse and interventions needed for the prevention of wife abuse are discussed. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street Binghamton, NY 13904-1580)

Journal article

Meeting the challenges of retirement and integrating the disabled into the community

Authors:
VASOO S., TIONG Tan Ngoh
Journal article citation:
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work, 6(1), March 1996, pp.1-5.
Publisher:
Times Academic

In view of future shortages of manpower and slower growth of populations in countries like Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia and New Zealand, it is expected that the question of retirement from work will receive more attention. Discusses the issue of the ageing workforce and introduces special issue on social security and family concerns.

Journal article

Social policies for the elderly in the Republic of Korea and Japan: a comparative perspective

Authors:
PALLEY Howard A., USUI Chikako
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 29(3), September 1995, pp.241-257.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The Republic of Korea (South Korea) and Japan are highly industralised and modern nations which are both influenced by the Confucian tradition of respect for elderly and family responsibility for the care of aging parents. In both countries the proportion of the elderly population is increasing. Japan, since the end of World War II, has utilized its government bureaucracy to help develop the social welfare system and to formulate social policies and programs for the elderly. Japan's tradition of samurai Confucianism is congruent with the commitment of the Japanese government to such social development as a matter of national policy. The Republic of Korea has not assigned a comprehensive planning role to its government bureaucracy. Lacking the mix of industrial/post-industrial infrastructure of Japan and not yet faced with the immediacy of a very large elderly population, the Republic of Korea's government has developed its social policies for the elderly in a more incremental manner, usually emphasizing small scale and piecemeal initiatives. With respect to social support, it has emphasized voluntary family efforts as congruent with the Korean (and Chinese) variant of Confucianism. This paper will compare and contrast these different approaches.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Factors influencing the degree of eating ability among people with dementia

Authors:
LEE Kyoung Min, SONG Jun-Ah
Journal article citation:
Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24(11-12), 2015, pp.1707-1717.
Publisher:
John Wiley and Sons

Aims and objectives: To explore the degree of eating ability in people with dementia and identify what factors affect their eating ability. Background: Appropriate food consumption is important to human life. Although eating difficulties are common among people with dementia, little is known about what factors might influence their eating ability. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Methods: A total of 149 people with dementia residing in nursing facilities in Seoul or the Gyeonggi area of Korea were evaluated using the Korean Mini-Mental State Examination, Korean Activities of Daily Living Scale and Eating Behaviour Scale. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance, Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Results: The participants showed a moderate level of dependency with respect to eating ability and were most dependent on the use of utensils. There were significant differences in eating ability according to general characteristics such as duration of residence, duration of illness, degree of visual impairment, eating place, and diet type. The eating ability of the participants was significantly correlated with cognitive function and physical function. Cognitive function, physical function, duration of illness, eating place (living room or dining room), and diet type (soft or liquid) significantly predicted eating ability in people with dementia. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that it is necessary to thoroughly assess the eating ability of people with dementia and to develop appropriate training programmes to maintain or improve their remaining eating ability. The creation of a pleasurable physical and social environment for eating might also be helpful. Relevance to clinical practice: These findings would be able to serve a useful basis in the development of materials for nursing intervention programmes for people with dementia during mealtimes by improving the techniques and care qualities of nursing caregivers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A normative study of the Trail Making Test in Korean elders

Authors:
SEO Eun Hyun, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 21(9), September 2006, pp.844-852.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of age, education and gender on the performance of the Trail Making Test (TMT) and provide normative information in Korean elders.The TMT was administered to 997 community-dwelling volunteers aged 60-90. People with serious neurological, medical and psychiatric disorders, including dementia, were excluded. Education and age had significant effects on both parts of the TMT. Gender also had an effect on part A of the TMT (Trail A). Based on these results, the norms of Trail A stratified by age (four overlapping tables), education (four strata) and gender, and the norms of part B of TMT (Trail B) stratified by age (four overlapping tables) and education (three strata). Age and educational level had a considerable influence on both Trail A and B. Our normative information on the Trail A will be useful in the elders with poor educational attainment and can be utilized for cross-cultural comparison of the Trail A performance. The fact that a large number of elders fail to complete Trail B indicates a limited applicability of Trail B in elderly population, particularly with poor educational background.

Journal article

An exploratory qualitative study on relationships between older people and home care workers in South Korea: the view from family carers and service providers

Author:
CHON Yongho
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 35(3), 2015, pp.629-652.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This exploratory qualitative study explores the relationships between older people and home care workers under the new Korean long-term care insurance system. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 22 family carers and private-sector home care service providers (home care workers and provider managers). The findings show that while the majority of family carers interviewed reported that their relationships were good, the majority of service providers' responses were more negative. Service providers stated that they experienced a number of difficulties that affected their relationships with older clients, including excessive demands or sexual harassment by the older people in their care, exposure to unsafe working environments, and poor treatment in terms of pay and conditions. The findings suggest that stable and good relationships between home care workers and their clients have not been secured in Korea's long-term care system. (Edited publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts