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Journal article

Social work in the development of institutional care for older people in Slovenia

Author:
MALI Jana
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 13(4), December 2010, pp.545-559.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Drawing on the author's doctoral thesis, this paper discusses the role and significance of social work in the development of institutional care for older people in Slovenia. The study involved development of a measurement instrument to identify differences between socially and medically oriented institutions. The paper describes a shift in the development of Slovenian homes for older people from medical to social orientation, influenced by social work, and notes that in socially oriented homes a different model of social work is applied than in the medically oriented homes, with the difference lying in social work methods as well as in the roles of the social worker in different areas of work with the residents, relatives and staff. It discusses the factors influencing the orientation of homes, arguing that the successful and changed practice of social work in particular with people with dementia could positively influence other fields of work, change how all residents in homes are treated, and contribute to the social orientation of homes for older people.

Journal article

Comparison of the characteristics of homes for older people in Slovenia with Goffman's concept of the total institution

Author:
MALI Jana
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 11(4), 2008, pp.431-443.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The past concepts of life and work in homes for older people in Slovenia are no longer adequate to meet the needs, wishes and requirements of their current users. One of the basic premises, relying on Goffman's concept of the total institution, is that the first and foremost characteristic of homes for older people is that they are institutions. The theoretical starting point, namely that Goffman's concept of the total institution is ideal-typical, was corroborated by an investigation of the presence of elements of the total institution in Slovenian homes for older people, proving that not all features of the total institution can be found in any chosen empirical selection of institutions, with the data showing that those characteristics which are present do not exist in the ideal, that is in the most pronounced form. The homes' users are given consideration, their personnel are adapting to their needs and requirements, even though this occurs within the functioning of an institution whose aims, i.e. to care for a large number of people living in one place, make life in such an institution subordinated to rules, along with the bureaucratisation and routinisation of services.

Journal article

Housing for care: a response to the post-transitional old-age gap?

Author:
MANDIC Srna
Journal article citation:
Journal of European Social Policy, 26(2), 2016, pp.155-167.
Publisher:
Sage

This article examines the trade-off between owned housing and old-age care in Slovenia where the population has been found outstandingly willing to enter residential care and also consume housing wealth for this purpose. To explain this peculiarity, a case study as a holistic in-depth analysis was conducted, combining multiple sources of quantitative survey data and qualitative interview-based insights and accounting for the institutional context and individual decisions. What was found was a modernised version of the traditional ‘inheritance for care’ exchange, whereby the inheritor partly finances the parent’s residential care. This family-mediated trade-off between old-age care and housing wealth was found to serve as an informal equity-release scheme which in Slovenia helps bridge the post-transitional old-age gap, the syndrome of low pensions, underdeveloped care services and owner-occupied housing un-adapted to seniors. Moreover, it is hypothesised that this structural gap is common to other post-transitional countries. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Long-term care quality assurance policies in European countries

Authors:
DANDI Roberto, et al
Publisher:
European Network of Economic Policy Research Institutes
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
89p.
Place of publication:
Brussels

This report present the findings and conclusions of research undertaken in the context of research projects carried out by a consortium of ENEPRI member institutes. This report is a contribution to Work Package 5 of the ANCIEN project, which focuses on the future of long-term care for the elderly in Europe. This report analyses the quality assurance policies for long-term care (LTC) in the following countries: Austria, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. First, it discusses quality assurance in LTC by analysing: the dimensions of quality, the policy frameworks for quality in LTC, the different levels of development of LTC quality policies at the international, national, organisational, and individual levels. Second, it describes the methodology for collecting and analysing data on quality policies in the selected countries. Finally, it discusses the results, identifying four clusters of countries based on quality policies and indicators for LTC. These clusters are compared to the clusters identified in Work Package 1 of the ANCIEN project. Policy recommendations are proposed.

Journal article

Ageing and health status in adults with intellectual disabilities: results of the European Pomona II study

Authors:
HAVEMAN Meindert, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 36(1), March 2011, pp.49-60.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

POMONA II was a European Commission funded public health project collecting information from 14 countries using a set of key health indicators specifically relevant for people with intellectual disabilities. This research focused on age-specific differences relating to environmental and lifestyle factors and the 17 medical conditions measured by the POMONA Checklist of Health Indicators. The article describes how information was collected using the POMONA Health Interview Survey and Evaluation Form from a sample of 1,253 participants in Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, and the United Kingdom. It then presents the results of the analysis, with tables showing characteristics of people with intellectual disabilities in the study, frequency of social contacts with relatives or friends according to age, lifestyle risk factors in people with intellectual disabilities according to age, and general and age-specific prevalence rates of health problems. The authors discuss how healthy older adults with intellectual disabilities are with regard to lifestyle factors, and whether there are health disparities between older adults with and without intellectual disabilities. They note that some evidence of health disparities was found for older people with intellectual disabilities, particularly in terms of under diagnosed or inadequately managed preventable health conditions.

Journal article

A Slovenia model of integrated care for older people can offer solutions for NHS services

Author:
JONES Helen
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 15.12.09, 2009, pp.10-12.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

A visit to an integrated model of care for older people in Slovenia is described. The care home visited, 'Sunny Dale'  enabled residents with health and social care needs to remain in the same place throughout their lives.

Journal article

Health and ageing in Slovenia: literature review

Authors:
PAHOR Majda, DOMAJNKO Barbara
Journal article citation:
Ageing International, 32(4), December 2008, pp.312-324.
Publisher:
Springer
Place of publication:
New York

The study aims to establish whether professional and scientific literature in Slovenia provides grounds for the integrated approach in care for the elderly. Literature review is used as the method of data collection and analysis. Relevant publications were searched for through the national electronic interdisciplinary bibliographic database. Data was collected twice, for the period from 1994 to 2003 and from 2004 to 2006, to establish the publishing trend. A chart is drawn, based on a distinction among three levels: disciplinary, multi-interdisciplinary and the level of integration. It outlines the conceptualization of elderly people’s health as shaped through selected literature, and another one exposes its changes in time. Results show the prevalent presence of the functionalist theoretical perspective on ageing and the bio-medical model of care for the elderly. The voice of the elderly is poorly acknowledged. Data testify to the lack of literature that would support the implementation of the integrated approach to the health of the elderly.

Journal article

The elderly in Slovenia

Author:
MESEC Blaz
Journal article citation:
Revija Za Socijalnu Politiku Journal of Social Policy, 7(1), 2000, pp.43-53.
Publisher:
University of Zagreb

Describes the situation of the elderly in Slovenia.

Book

Private markets in health and welfare: an international perspective

Editor:
JOHNSON Norman
Publisher:
Berg
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
263p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Collection of papers examining the growing role of private markets in the provision and finance of health and social welfare services in the UK, Canada, France, Italy, Sweden, the United States, Hungary, Poland and Slovenia. Considers whether the principal beneficiaries have been the state, the consumers, or the commercial providers. Includes papers on domiciliary and residential services, housing, and a range of health services.

Book

Payments for care: a comparative overview

Editors:
EVERS Adalbert, PIJL Marja, UNGERSON Clare
Publisher:
Avebury
Publication year:
1994
Pagination:
358p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

Presents a collection of papers looking at how payments for care schemes are developing across Western and Central Europe, the United States and Canada. Includes discussions of payments to 'volunteers', and consideration of the way in which social security and tax systems work to increase the incomes of care recipients and their carers. Also includes introductory chapters discussing general and theoretical issues involved in the development of systems of payments for care including the labour market, empowerment and the relationship between carers and care recipients.

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