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Book Full text available online for free

Financial abuse of older people in Northern Ireland: the unsettling truth

Author:
COMMISSIONER FOR OLDER PEOPLE FOR NORTHERN IRELAND
Publisher:
Commissioner for Older People for Northern Ireland
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
24
Place of publication:
Belfast

This study provides evidence of the scope and scale of the financial abuse of older people in Northern Ireland. The study interviewed 1,025 people older people (aged 60 and over) across Northern Ireland were surveyed in relation to financial abuse. They were asked 29 questions in relation to their personal finances, money-management and decision-making in the last 12 months. The results found that that 21 per cent of older people surveyed had experienced some kind of financial abuse. The most prevalent forms of financial abuse identified were issues relating to money and possessions (7 per cent of respondents); buying and selling goods (6 per cent of respondents); and issues relating to charity contributions (4 per cent of respondents). Other types of financial abuse identified included: coercion to sign and fraudulent use of signatures; changes to legal and financial documents and investments; experience of coercion; bank account activity; deception and misuse of money; and issues relating to inheritance and power of attorney. Based on the result of the survey sample, which was representative of Northern Ireland’s older population, the findings suggest that over 75,000 older people are experiencing some form of financial abuse in Northern Ireland. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Older people and legal advice - the need for joined up and creative approaches

Authors:
DUFFY Joe, BASU Subhajit, PEARSON Katherine C.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 34(1), March 2012, pp.31-47.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This paper reports the findings from research conducted with older people which investigated whether their needs for legal information and advice were being met. Participants included 25 key informants such as solicitors, advice centres in the voluntary sector and staff in the statutory social sector. Also 7 focus groups were conducted with 83 older people across Northern Ireland. The findings suggest that online legal information may frequently assist older people in identifying potential answers to their legal questions, but may not be an adequate substitute for personal communication and advice. The research also highlighted the need for professionals to work together to meet the needs of older persons for legal advice and to safeguard their interests. Such ‘joined up’ approaches are particularly important, for example at the point of dementia diagnosis, where information sharing between health and social care professionals may significantly promote the legal and welfare interests of older people at a vulnerable point in their lives.

Journal article

A qualitative evaluation of the provision of bereavement care accessed by service users living in a health and social care trust area in Northern Ireland

Authors:
MONTGOMERY Lorna, CAMPBELL Anne
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life and Palliative Care, 8(2), April 2012, pp.165-181.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia

Within the health and social care sector today, the management of death and bereavement has become increasingly challenging. This qualitative study aimed to investigate the bereavement care offered to individuals living in one Health and Social Care Trust catchment area of Northern Ireland. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 key government and voluntary agency staff. The results suggest that much of the bereavement provision is based on the interest and initiative of individual staff members, with few processes to assess the level of bereavement care needed and those best skilled to provide it. Recommendations are made for a bereavement care strategy that outlines a bereavement needs assessment process. Implications for practice are presented.

Book Full text available online for free

Reviewing the case for an Older People's Commissioner in Northern Ireland

Author:
NORTHERN IRELAND. Northern Ireland Assembly. Research and Library Services\
Publisher:
Northern Ireland. Northern Ireland Assembly. Research and Library Services
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
46p.
Place of publication:
Belfast

In 2007 the Office of the First Minister and deputy First Minister (OFMDFM) appointed independent consultants to review the case for creating a Commissioner for Older People for Northern Ireland. The consultants were also to advise on the potential role and remit of a Commissioner. They carried out research and met with age sector organisations, statutory bodies and other stakeholders and delivered a final feasibility report to OFMDFM in May 2008. A key conclusion in the report was that there was a need for a Commissioner for Older People. The report recommended that legislation be introduced to enable a Commissioner to be appointed with a range of functions, powers and duties. OFMDFM consequently drew up policy proposals and draft legislation and carried out pre-consultation with stakeholder organisations and a formal public consultation between October 2009 and January 2010.

Book Full text available online for free

The impact of devolution: long-term care provision in the UK

Author:
BELL David
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
41p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

This report on long-term care provision policies, from a series on the impact of 10 years devolved government in the United Kingdom, considers the constraint that tax and benefit structure (control of which remains centrally within the Departmental Expenditure Limits (DEL) system), has on Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales and England. The importance of having secondary social care, funded from Annually Managed Expenditure by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) and less bound to annual budgets than DEL, in minimising diversity of delivered care is discussed. The inability of devolved governments to steer DWP, due to weak intergovernmental relations, is highlighted and in section 2 Scottish attendance allowances and Welsh domiciliary care charges are contrasted. Section 3 details demand for care varies more within countries than between them, while section 4 highlights divergence in older people’s ability to pay. A current snapshot of care provision across the UK in section 5, is followed by a focus on free personal care, personalisation and charging in Section 6.  Section 7 reiterates that policies can be constrained as well as enhanced by devolution. Other reports, in this series, detail area based regeneration, indicators of poverty and social exclusion, employment and employability and housing and homelessness.

Book Full text available online for free

Safer ageing: a strategy and action plan for ensuring the safety of older people

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Northern Ireland Office
Publisher:
Great Britain. Northern Ireland Office
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
24p.
Place of publication:
London

In 2007 the Northern Ireland Office Community Safety Unit (CSU) published Proposals for the Safety of Older People, a consultation document seeking views on the priorities for reducing crime, the fear of crime and anti-social behaviour. Workshops were held with older people’s groups across Northern Ireland and in addition responses to the consultation were received from statutory agencies, voluntary and community groups and older people’s groups. Following the consultation an Older Person’s Working Group was convened to develop a final action and strategy plan. The resulting strategy, Safer Ageing, is described. The strategy sets out the priorities and the actions that will be taken to help reduce crime and fear of crime amongst older people and to help make them safe and feel safe in their homes and neighbourhoods. A Steering Group will implement the actions and will also act as a forum where older people’s concerns around crime and anti-social behaviour can be discussed. Progress will be reviewed in 2011.

Journal article

Older people – recipients but also providers of informal care: an analysis among community samples in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland

Authors:
MCGEE Hannah M., et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 16(5), September 2008, pp.548-553.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Data on both the provision and receipt of informal care among populations of older adults are limited. Patterns of both informal care provided and received by older adults in the Republic of Ireland (RoI) and Northern Ireland (NI) were evaluated. A cross-sectional community-based population survey was conducted. Randomly selected older people (aged 65+, n = 2033, mean age (standard deviation): 74.1 years (6.8), 43% men, 68% response rate) provided information on the provision and receipt of care, its location, and the person(s) who provided the care. Twelve per cent of the sample (251/2033) identified themselves as informal caregivers (8% RoI and 17% NI). Caregivers were more likely to be women, married, have less education and have less functional impairment. Forty-nine per cent reported receiving some form of care in the past year. Care recipients were more likely to be older, married, have more functional impairment, and poorer self-rated health. Receiving regular informal care (help at least once a week) from a non-resident relative was the most common form of help received. Five per cent (n = 102/2033) of the sample reported both providing and receiving informal care. Levels of informal care provided by community-dwelling older adults were notably higher than reported in single-item national census questions. The balance of formal and informal health and social care will become increasingly important as populations age. It is essential, therefore, to evaluate factors facilitating or impeding informal care delivery.

Book Full text available online for free

Report into older people and domiciliary care: together with minutes of proceedings of the committee relating to the report and the minutes of evidence

Author:
NORTHERN IRELAND. Northern Ireland Assembly. Public Accounts Committee
Publisher:
Northern Ireland. Northern Ireland Assembly. Public Accounts Committee
Publication year:
2008
Place of publication:
Belfast

Many workers are deserting their posts because of poor morale, a report from the Public Accounts Committee said. It examined how the Department of Health is trying to transform its system from mainly residential care to supported care at home. It said steps must be taken to raise the esteem of the caring profession. The report added: "The committee advised that failure to address this issue could lead to a shortfall in the standard and supply of domiciliary care services for older people." The recommendations come in a paper entitled "Report into Older People and Domiciliary Care at home". Some workers are paid close to the minimum wage of £5.52 per hour and private companies which provide the care have accused health authorities of failing to set aside enough money, said the committee. In the voluntary sector, the lack of guaranteed hours, the low hourly rates payable and the often poor conditions of employment can affect the morale of staff and hinder recruitment and retention of staff.

Book Full text available online for free

The Employment Equality (Age) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2006: statutory rule 2006 no. 261

Author:
NORTHERN IRELAND
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
68p.
Place of publication:
Belfast

These Regulations, which are made under section 2(2) of the European Communities Act 1972 (c.68), implement (in Northern Ireland) Council Directive 2000/78/EC of 27th November 2000 establishing a general framework for equal treatment in employment (OJ L 303, 2.12.2000, p.16) so far as it relates to discrimination on grounds of age. The Regulations make it unlawful to discriminate on grounds of age in employment and vocational training. They prohibit direct discrimination, indirect discrimination, victimisation, instructions to discriminate and harassment.

Journal article

A champion for older people

Author:
CONNOLLY Joleen
Journal article citation:
Scope, November 2005, p.22.
Publisher:
Northern Ireland Council for Voluntary Action

The author argues that Northern Ireland needs an independent commissioner for older people rather than a civil service advocate.

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