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Journal article

Young children's perception of the elderly: a comparison of data from the United States and Southeastern Nigeria

Author:
OKOYE Uzoma O.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intergenerational Relationships, 3(3), 2005, pp.7-24.
Publisher:
Routledge
Place of publication:
Philadelphia

Young children's perceptions of the elderly were examined using Child-Adolescent Facts on Aging Quiz in order to assess what relationships exist between perception and contact with the elderly, gender, and age. Comparisons were also made between the findings in this study and a previous one in the United States of America. One hundred and twenty respondents comprising fifty males and seventy females from two primary schools answered the questionnaire. The mean age of the respondents was 10.6 years and about 63% had at least a living grandparent. The results of the study showed that pupils generally have misconceptions of the elderly. Item 6 - "most older workers do not work as well as younger workers" had the highest error rate of 83% while item 4 - "old people are not as strong as younger people" had the lowest error rate of 16%. Some similarities and differences in perception of the elderly were found in the Nigerian and American samples. The implications of these findings are discussed and further areas of research suggested. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Risk factors for dementia in central Nigeria

Authors:
OCHAYI B., THACHER T. D.
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 10(6), November 2006, pp.616-620.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Little is known about the prevalence of dementia and its associated risk factors in developing countries. Some studies suggest that the prevalence of dementia is lower in developing countries than it is in high-income nations. We sought to determine risk factors for dementia in elderly persons in central Nigeria. Using the standardized Community Screening Instrument for Dementia, we screened a stratified, random community sample of 280 persons aged 65 years and older for dementia. We examined the independent association of known risk factors with dementia using logistic regression. The overall prevalence of dementia was 6.4% (95% CI 3.8–9.9%). Independent risk factors for dementia included female sex, body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 or less, and age. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use was associated with a reduced risk of dementia. Education, blood pressure, history of stroke, family history of dementia, and rural residence were not significantly associated with dementia in the multivariate model. The prevalence of dementia in central Nigeria may be greater than that found in other developing countries. Female sex, low body mass index, lack of NSAID use, and advancing age were the major risk factors in this population.

Journal article

Geriatric depression in Nigerian primary care attendees

Authors:
SOKOYA Olukunle, BAIYEWU Olusegun
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 18(6), June 2003, pp.506-510.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

202 older people were screened using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). The Geriatric Mental State schedule (GMS) was administered to participants who scored above the cut-off on the GDS in order to assess psychopathology. Diagnosis of depression was based on ICD-10 criteria as well as the GMS-AGECAT programme. The rate of geriatric depression in primary care was found to be 7.4%. Severe depression was only 1.5%. Very low income and subjective report of poor health were significantly associated with depression in the cohort. AGECAT recognition of depression was comparable to that by the ICD-10 (k = 0.7). The study is the first known study of geriatric depression in primary care in Nigeria. The rates are comparable with rates obtained in other countries. Specific correlates of depression in the older Nigerians identified included poor self-assessed health and low income.

Journal article

Family support and health status of the elderly in Imo State of Nigeria

Author:
UNANKA Godwin O.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Issues, 58(4), Winter 2002, pp.681-695.
Publisher:
Wiley

This article highlights ageing issues in a community in a developing African nation. Seventy-five elders were sampled from Imo State, Nigeria. Results indicate that family support is potentially available at a ratio of 3 to 1 with most of the elderly depending on their children, wives, in-laws,and God. The elderly express satisfaction with family care and they rarely live alone. The elders attach greater value to non-material (physical presence/emotional) support. The most prevalent acute and chronic illnesses of the elderly are respectively malaria, followed by severe headache, flu, sleeping problems; and rheumatism/arthritis, followed by failing vision, general weakness and hip problems.

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