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Journal article

Pioneer spirit

Author:
COHEN Phil
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 8.11.90, 1990, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Reports on a project in inner-city Amsterdam which has fought for home care of older people, rooted in the community.

Journal article

Access to bridge employment: who finds and who does not find work after retirement?

Authors:
DINGEMANS Ellen, HENKENS Kene, VAN SOLINGE Hanna
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 56(4), 2016, pp.630-640.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

Purpose of the study: Empirical studies on the determinants of bridge employment have often neglected the fact that some retirees may be unsuccessful in finding a bridge job. We present an integrative framework that emphasises socioeconomic factors, health status, social context, and psychological factors to explain why some people fully retired after career exit, some participated in bridge jobs, while others unsuccessfully searched for one. Design and methods: Using Dutch panel data for 1,221 retirees, we estimated a multinomial logit model to explain participation in, and unsuccessful searches for, bridge employment. Results: About 1 in 4 retirees participated in bridge employment after retirement, while 7% searched unsuccessfully for such work. Particularly those who experienced involuntary career exit were found to have a higher probability of being unsuccessful at finding bridge employment. Implications: The current study provides evidence for the impact of the social context on post-retirement work and suggests a cumulative disadvantage in the work domain in later life. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Older persons’ definitions and explanations of elder abuse in the Netherlands

Authors:
MYSYUK Yuliya, WESTENDORP Rudi G.J., LINDENBERG Jolanda
Journal article citation:
Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, 28(2), 2016, pp.95-113.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

In this article the authors explore older persons’ definitions of and explanations for elder abuse in the Netherlands by means of interviews with older persons. A qualitative study was conducted based on semistructured interviews with 35 older persons who had no experience with abuse. The author's findings show that older persons participating in their study define elder abuse foremost as physical violence that is performed intentionally. The study participants explain elder abuse as a result of the dependency and vulnerability of older persons, of changing norms and values, and of changes in the position of older persons in society, which result in disrespect toward older persons and a lack of social control and responsibility. The older persons’ explanations for the occurrence of abuse mainly focus on societal changes; older persons seem to regard elder abuse primarily as a societal problem. This understanding of, and explanation for, elder abuse may influence their detection and reporting behaviour, as they may tend to acknowledge only severe cases of intentional physical violence that leave clear and therefore physically detectable evidence. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The heterogeneity of socially isolated older adults: a social isolation typology

Author:
MACHIELSE Anja
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 58(4), 2015, pp.338-356.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Recent statistics show a growing number of older adults who are living alone and are socially isolated. It is against this background that, in recent years, many interventions have been developed to address social isolation among the elderly. Evaluative studies show that most interventions are hardly effective, though. An important reason for this is the heterogeneity of the socially isolated. This article offers insight into this heterogeneity by presenting a typology with different profiles of socially isolated older adults and the intervention implications of this typology. The typology is derived from an extensive qualitative study on socially isolated elderly individuals in the Netherlands. The typology imposes some degree of order to a diversity of circumstances, ambitions, and possibilities of the socially isolated elderly, thereby deepening the understanding of the heterogeneity of this population. The definition of social isolation used in this study starts from a societal angle of incidence, namely the current policy context of Western European welfare states, in which governments emphasize the importance of independence and self-reliance of their citizens. Developed from that perspective, the typology provides a theoretical basis for applying interventions aimed at increasing self-reliance of social isolated elderly. This perspective on social isolation also has consequences for the way in which the effectiveness of interventions to alleviate social isolation is assessed. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

‘The Taste Buddies’: participation and empowerment in a residential home for older people

Authors:
BAUR Vivianne, ABMA Tineke
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 32(6), August 2012, pp.1055-1078.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

The participation and autonomy of older people living in residential homes is considered to be problematic. However, in this action research project conducted in a Dutch residential care organisation the authors found ways to enhance residents' direct participation. This article we describes how a group of seven female residents, calling themselves ‘The Taste Buddies’, developed a joint vision on how meals could be improved, which enhanced the group's empowerment, building interpersonal trust, social identity and joint purpose. The authors argue that resident participation as partnership with employees and managers starts with relational empowerment among residents themselves. This process is non-linear and requires time and constructive facilitation.

Journal article

Coping with loneliness: what do older adults suggest?

Authors:
SCHOENMAKERS Eric C., TILBURG Theo G. van, FOKKEMA Tineke
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 16(3), April 2012, pp.353-360.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Loneliness is common among old people. High levels of loneliness in old age are generally linked to widowhood, shrinking social networks, and health problems. Ways of coping with loneliness can be categorised into 2 types: active coping by improving relationships; and regulative coping by lowering expectations about relationships. This study explored how often older adults suggest these options to their lonely peers in various situations, and to what extent individual resources influence their suggestions. The participants were 1187 respondents aged 62–100 years from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam. The participants were presented with 4 written vignettes of lonely individuals, discriminated with regard to age, partner status, and health, were asked whether this loneliness can be alleviated by using various ways of coping. In general, the respondents suggested both ways of coping. However, active coping was suggested less often to people who are older, in poor health, or lonely and by older adults who were employed in midlife and have high self-esteem. Regulative coping was suggested more often to people who are older and by older adults with a low educational level and with low mastery. The problems of developing interventions to combat loneliness are discussed.

Book

Strategies of care: changing elderly care in Italy and the Netherlands

Author:
ROIT Barbara Da
Publisher:
Amsterdam University Press
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
220p.
Place of publication:
Amsterdam

This book traces the changes in the elderly care systems of Italy and the Netherlands since the early 1990s, drawing attention to the advantages and disadvantages of these two very different models. It examines the formal care system of the Dutch, and reveals how this system, despite strong policy pressures, has remained relatively stable, while the Italian system has undergone major transitions despite minimal policy intervention. Based on a wealth of data and extensive interviews with both caregivers and patients, this book is designed for anyone interested in the future of European health care debates. Contents include: changing care systems - an introduction; the context and policy trajectories; the challenge of dependence; changing care packages; care packages in practice; the creation of care packages and the transformations of care systems; and conclusions.

Book Full text available online for free

Ageing and well-being in an international context

Author:
CLIFTON Jonathan
Publisher:
Institute for Public Policy Research
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
36p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The author asks what lessons the UK can learn from several case studies from overseas about how the well-being of older people can be incorporated into a wider range of policy areas than those, traditionally, of pensions, health and social care. For example, in the UK an ageing population brings more focus onto mental health, loneliness and isolation issues, whereas life satisfaction is highest in Japan among those over 65. In addition, case studies from Ireland, the United States, Norway, Finland, New Zealand and China are presented with much variation in findings. Examples of how the well-being of older people can be addressed in the four key areas of relationships, work, learning and the built environment are discussed and put forward by the author as good practice for the future of an ageing population in the UK.

Journal article

Early response as predictor of final remission in elderly depressed patients

Authors:
KOK Rob M., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 24(11), November 2009, pp.1299-1303.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Several studies have attempted to predict the final response or remission based on improvement during the early course of treatment of major depression, but there is variation in the cut offs used to define early response and in the best week to predict final results. This study aimed to compare different cut-offs at different time points early in the treatment of elderly depressed patients, using a 12 week randomised controlled trial in 81 elderly inpatients with major depression comparing venlafaxine with nortriptyline. The results showed that in elderly in patients, prediction of final remission is possible as early as week 3. In conclusion the researchers suggested that, combining the results from this study and other studies addressing this issue, treatment should be changed in the elderly if after 3-4 weeks less than 30% improvement in depression score has been achieved.

Journal article

A creative reminiscence program for older adults with severe mental disorders: results of a pilot evaluation

Author:
WILLMESE Bernadette M.
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 13(5), September 2009, pp.736-743.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Older adults with severe mental disorders can experience major dissatisfaction with conditions of life that are connected with ageing. To assist them in developing a coherent, meaningful life-story and to improve their life satisfaction, a pilot evaluation of a creative reminiscence program called Searching for meaning in life was conducted. One week before and one week after the intervention 36 participants from three psychiatric hospitals and one sheltered housing program in the Netherlands were interviewed. Life satisfaction was measured with the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA) and the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Moral Scale (PGCMS). At follow-up questions were also asked about the intervention. About 78% of the participants completed the course. Most of them were satisfied with the course (74%). The overall sample showed significantly more life satisfaction after the intervention. Participants with a psychotic disorder also improved significantly in life satisfaction but at the same time their depressive symptoms increased significantly. Participants with a moderate to high level of depressive symptoms at baseline had relatively favourable outcomes. Their life satisfaction had improved significantly and they especially had a better attitude toward their ageing. disorders.

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