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Book

Empowering older people: an international approach

Editors:
THURSZ Daniel, NUSBERG Charlotte, PRATHER Johnnie
Publisher:
Cassell
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
233p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Presents papers from experts from 17 countries on empowering older people as individuals, through organisations, and in developing countries.

Book

Family care of the elderly: social and cultural changes

Editor:
KOSBERG Jordan I.
Publisher:
Sage
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
329p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Newbury Park, CA

Takes a global look at care for older people within the family circle, and compares and contrasts global changes in the last decade.

Journal article

Manufacturing heterosexuality: hormone replacement therapy and menopause in urban Oaxaca

Author:
RAMIREZ Michelle
Journal article citation:
Culture, Health and Sexuality, 8(6), November 2006, pp.545-558.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

For several decades, hormone replacement therapies have been prescribed to women, not only to prevent disease but to improve the sexual functioning of menopausal women. The medical promotion of continued sexual activity in a woman's post‐reproductive years is exported to locations outside of North America and Europe, which provides an opportunity to critically examine the cultural roots that have informed expert biomedical representations. This ethnographic study examined menopause and social class in Oaxaca de Juarez, Mexico using interviews, questionnaires, and textual analysis. The research found that biomedicine in conjunction with the pharmaceutical industry promoted culturally constructed gender hierarchies under the guise of optimal menopausal health. However, women's actual experience of gender and sexuality in mid‐life diverged significantly from these expert representations. Themes that emerged in interviews and questionnaires included the importance of motherhood in old age, diminished sexual desire as not problematic, and greater sexual freedom at a post‐reproductive age. Ultimately, biomedical discourse was not the sole arbiter of appropriate menopausal womanhood and femininity.

Journal article

A social health services model to promote active ageing in Mexico: design and evaluation of a pilot programme

Authors:
PEREZ-CUEVAS Ricardo, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 35(7), 2015, pp.1457-1480.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

The objective of the study was to design and evaluate a pilot programme aimed at promoting the active ageing of older adults at the Mexican Institute of Social Security. The study was conducted in three stages: (a) design; (b) implementation; and (c) before–after evaluation through analysis of changes in functional status, occupational functioning and health-related quality of life. To overcome the limitations of the study design, the authors evaluated the effect of 80 per cent adherence to the programme on the outcome variables using the generalised linear regression models (GLM). Two hundred and thirty-nine older adults agreed to participate, of whom 65 per cent completed the programme. Most were women; the average age was 77 years. Adherence to the programme was higher than 75 per cent for the group who completed active ageing services and less than 60 per cent for the drop-out group. Overall, 46 per cent of older adults reached an adherence level of 80 per cent or higher. Adherence was significantly associated with improved quality of life total score (coefficient 2.7, p<0.0001) and occupational functioning total score (coefficient 2.2, p<0.0001). Participation of older adults in an active ageing programme may improve their health-related quality of life and occupational functioning. It is necessary to identify the potential barriers and to implement strategies to improve the recruitment and retention rates during the intervention. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Guardians of health: the dimensions of elder caregiving among women in a Mexico City neighborhood

Authors:
MENDEZ-LUCK Carolyn, KENNEDY David P., WALLACE Steven P.
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 68(2), January 2009, pp.228-234.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Little is known about the family care of older adults in Mexico and the role of women in this process. To begin to fill this knowledge gap, this paper describes how a small sample of low-income women in one Mexico City neighbourhood conceptualized the caregiver role and identified the forms of assistance they gave to their older relatives on a daily basis. A grounded theory approach was used to collect and analyze the data. Forty-one semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with female caregivers. The age of participants was between 19 and 83 years, and care recipients between 56 and 92 years. The relationship of caregiver to care recipient was wife, daughter, daughter-in-law, granddaughter, sibling, and other relative. The mean length of time providing care was 5 years. Most participants were not employed outside the home, and the median monthly household income was 2000 pesos. We found that caregiving was a life-changing event, with 27 of 41 participants viewing themselves as guardians. Caregivers' emphasis was on care recipients' emotional needs in order to provide “the most precious gift” of “time and attention.” Two forms of assistance were ‘keeping company’ and ‘watching out’ as safeguards against poor health or further decline in health. These findings increase the cultural understanding of caregiving in Mexico. Further research is needed to test the caregiving concepts identified in this study.

Journal article

Pathways to health and mental-health service utilization among older Mexicans

Authors:
ROGERS Anissa T., GALLEGOS Joseph S.
Journal article citation:
International Social Work, 50(5), September 2007, pp.654-670.
Publisher:
Sage

Pathways to service utilization among older Mexicans and Mexican- Americans were investigated through examining participants’ health beliefs and behaviours. Results indicated that definitions of health and illness had an impact on service utilization decisions. Results also suggested that an assumption that Mexican elders utilize social support networks for healthcare assistance is questionable, with implications for practice.

Journal article

Significance of family involvement for older Mexican American women: implications for practice

Authors:
HATCHETT Bonnie F., GARCIA Lydia, MARTIN Christina
Journal article citation:
Journal of Family Social Work, 6(2), 2001, pp.55-68.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Due to increasing longevity of older adults it is essential that issues affecting life satisfaction are explored and well-being to gather information pertinent to quality of life issues. Reports findings from a pilot study utilising a non-random convenience sample design to determine attitudes about perceptions of well-being in a sample consisting of older Mexican American women residing along the Texas-Mexico border. Implications for social workers as well as other providers of service to ethnic minority older adults are included.

Book Full text available online for free

Ageing societies: challenges and opportunities: evidence from the BUPA health pulse 2010 international healthcare survey

Authors:
FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis, FORDER Julien
Publisher:
Bupa
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
27p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This report presents the findings of the Bupa Health Pulse 2010 international healthcare survey around the theme of 'ageing societies'. It summarises some of the most important evidence about the ageing process across the world, and discusses some of the key policy challenges that ageing presents, looking particularly at the capacity for societies to provide high quality support for their older people in the future. The study surveyed 12,262 people across 12 countries (Australia, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Mexico, Russia, Spain, UK, USA), but the patterns described are common to a much larger number of countries. The report is structured around 3 parts. The first examines the question of the ageing process in different societies and what it means in terms of: increases in the older population; changes in the balance between young and old; and increases in the number of people with health problems and in the level of demand for care services. The second part examines the support system required to look after older people in need of care including: the sharing of caring and funding responsibilities between the state and private individuals; the need to ensure that resources are in place to look after the growing number of older people; and the levels of support provided to older people in need. The last section summarises the key policy implications.

Journal article

Socioeconomic differences in health among older adults in Mexico

Authors:
SMITH Kimberly, GOLDMAN Noreen
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 65(7), October 2007, pp.1372-1385.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Although the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and health is well-established in Western industrialized countries, few studies have examined this association in developing countries, particularly among older cohorts. We use the Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS), a nationally representative survey of Mexicans age 50 and older, to investigate the linkages between three indicators of SES (education, income, and wealth) and a set of health outcomes and behaviours in more and less urban areas of Mexico. We consider three measures of current health (self-rated health and two measures of physical functioning) and three behavioural indicators (obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption). In urban areas, we find patterns similar to those in industrialized countries: higher SES individuals are more likely to report better health than their lower SES counterparts, regardless of the SES measure considered. In contrast, we find few significant SES–health associations in less urban areas. The results for health behaviours are generally similar between the two areas of residence. One exception is the education–obesity relationship. Our results suggest that education is a protective factor for obesity in urban areas and a risk factor in less urban areas. Contrary to patterns in the industrialized world, income is associated with higher rates of obesity, smoking, and excessive alcohol consumption. We also evaluate age and sex differences in the SES–health relationship among older Mexicans. The results suggest that further economic development in Mexico may lead to a widening of socioeconomic inequalities in health. The study also provides insight into why socioeconomic gradients in health are weak among Mexican-Americans and underscores the importance of understanding health inequalities in Latin America for research on Hispanic health patterns in the US.

Book

Elderly care: a world perspective

Editor:
TOUT Ken
Publisher:
Chapman and Hall
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
240p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Contains examples of successful service provision for older people from 40 countries. The case studies are organised into the following sections: care at home; community support; empowerment; participation; fitness and well-being; income generation; environment; integrated services; mental health; training for elder care; organisation of services; and older women.

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