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Journal article

Dementia and depression among nursing home residents in Lebanon: a pilot study

Authors:
CHAHINE L.M., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 22(4), April 2007, pp.283-285.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of dementia and depression among a portion of nursing home residents (NHR) in Lebanon and describe the characteristics of NHR afflicted with dementia and depression.  Of 200 NHR from three NH in Lebanon, 117 were selected by random sampling. Data on demographics and medical history were collected. An Arabic version of the Mini-Mental Status Examination and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) were administered. The final sample consisted of 102 NHR. Sixty-one (59.8%) had dementia of some kind. Seventeen (27.9%) had mild dementia, 14 (22.9%) had moderate dementia, and 30 (49.2%) had severe dementia. Forty-five (57.7%) of the NHR tested had depression as measured by a GDS score of more than 10.  Dementia and depression were present in more than half of the NHR in our sample. The results highlight the importance of screening NHR for dementia and depression on admission and at regular time intervals.

Journal article

Acute stress disorder in older, middle-aged and younger adults in reaction to the second Lebanon war

Author:
COHEN Miri
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 23(1), January 2008, pp.34-40.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The aim was to compare rate of acute stress disorder (ASD) and intensity of acute stress symptoms (ASS) in younger, middle-aged and older Israeli citizens exposed to missile attacks during the second Lebanon war. A telephone survey of a random sample of residents in the northern area of Israel was conducted in July 2006, during the third week of Lebanon war. Respondents were divided into groups aged 18-40, 41-69 and 70+. ASD and ASS were measured by the Acute Stress Interview questionnaire and by war-related exposure variables and demographic data. Exposure variables were similar in the three age groups. Older respondents reported lower intensity of ASS and obtained lower means for each of the symptoms criteria than the young adults, while the middle-aged adults were in between the younger and the older group. ASD criteria were met by 13.2% of the younger, 4.7% of middle-aged and 4.3% of older respondents (p > 0.05), and subsyndromal ASD was found in 20.5%, 14.1% and 4.4% (p < 0.05) respectively. Twenty-two percent of ASS variance was explained by younger age, female gender and higher perceived proximity to missile falling. Older adults reacted to the war situation with lower level of acute stress symptoms. Long-term effects of war on different age groups should be further studied.

Journal article

Health care delivery systems for older adults: how do the Netherlands and Lebanon compare?

Authors:
HOSPERS Aaltje, CHAHINE Lama M., CHEMALI Zeina
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 65(10), November 2007, pp.1979-1985.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Older individuals are given low priority compared to other age groups in many societies and geriatric care is not well-developed in many countries. With the global trend in population aging, the increasing number of older adults can be expected to challenge already-fragile health care facilities. Health care systems vary greatly from one country to another. Based on common research interests and through an educational exchange program between the University of Groningen (the Netherlands) and the American University of Beirut (Lebanon), a project was started to compare the Dutch and Lebanese health care delivery systems for older individuals, demonstrate their strengths and pitfalls, and draw from their resemblance and differences pivotal conclusions leading to positive change. The nursing homes, geriatric medicine and insurance coverage, and pension plans of both countries were studied.

Journal article

Marital status, intergenerational co-residence and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality among middle-aged and older men and women during wartime in Beirut: gains and liabilities

Authors:
SIBAI Abla M., YOUNT Kathyrn M., FLETCHER Astrid
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 64(1), January 2007, pp.64-76.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Studies from the West have shown an increased risk of mortality with various indicators of social isolation. In this study, we examine associations of marital status and intergenerational co-residence with mortality in Lebanon, a country that suffered wars and atrocities for almost 16 years. Using data from a retrospective 10-year follow-up study (1984–1994) among 1567 adults aged 50 years and older in Beirut, cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality rates (per 1000 person-years) were computed for men and women separately. Age-adjusted Mantel–Haenszel rate ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated, and associations were examined using multivariate Poisson regression analysis. Most men (91.3%) were married at baseline, in contrast to only 55.4% of women. Compared to men, women were more likely to be living in one- and three-generation households and with a married child at baseline. While widowhood was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality among men only, being never married was associated with a higher CVD mortality risk among men and women. The presence of an adult married child was associated with a significantly higher mortality risk for men and women, even after adjusting for household socioeconomic indicators, marital status, lifestyle variables or pre-existing health-related conditions (hypertension, cholesterol, and diabetes) at baseline. The popular belief that co-residence with adult children reflects greater support networks and an avenue for old age security may not be a valid presumption in the Lebanese context during times of war.

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