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Journal article

Old and young in Japan

Author:
DIX Jacqueline
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 8(4), December 2004, pp.33-34.
Publisher:
Emerald

Reports on experiences of intergenerational work in Japan, concluding it is developing around positive ageing. The World Health Organization says Japan has the fittest and healthiest older population. Describes the Wonderful Ageing Club, which encourages and supports older people in social activities.

Book

Services for elderly people: conclusions of a visit to Japan

Authors:
HARBERT Wally, DEXTER Margaret
Publisher:
Avon. Social Services Department
Publication year:
1989
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
Bristol
Journal article

Reminiscence triggers in community-dwelling older adults in Japan

Authors:
HANAOKA Hideaki, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 79(4), 2016, pp.220-227.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

Introduction: Visual and auditory cues have been highlighted as methods to trigger reminiscences; however, the basis of this practice remains unclear. Here the authors conducted a preliminary cross-sectional study to identify reminiscence cues and their scientific basis by investigating the relationship between reminiscences in elderly people and their reminiscence cues. Method: The participants were 126 older adults aged 65 years or over. They were asked about the experiences of reminiscences in response to stimuli such as photographs, music, or smells. Data on the frequency and quality of reminiscences were collected. Geriatric depression scale and simple personality test for the elderly were assessed. Results: A multiple regression analysis revealed that reminiscences tended to be more frequent in older and less sociable participants. Highly sociable participants with reminiscences in response to olfactory stimuli tended to have positive reminiscences, while participants with less sociability and past unresolved issues tended to have negative reminiscences. Conclusion: To understand the process of reminiscence in an older person, it is important to consider the person’s age, personality characteristics, and past unresolved issues. In addition, olfactory stimuli may also evoke pleasant reminiscences. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Home visits by commissioned welfare volunteers and psychological distress: a population-based study of 11,312 community-dwelling older people in Japan

Authors:
NOGUCHI Masayuki, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 30(12), 2015, pp.1156-1163.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objective: Social support is a resource for the older people that effectively reduces psychological distress, with or without specialised health service provision. This cross-sectional study was conducted to determine whether home visits by commissioned welfare volunteers (organisations of community residents assigned by national or local governments) are associated with a lower risk of psychological distress among the older people. Methods: Questionnaires were sent in August 2010 to all residents aged ≥65 years in three municipalities (n = 21,232) in Okayama Prefecture in Japan; 13,929 were returned (response rate = 65.6%). The final sample size for the analysis was 11,312 participants. Home visits, psychological distress (Kessler Psychological Distress Scale: K6 > 5), and severe psychological distress (K6 > 13) were measured by the questionnaire. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for psychological distress, adjusting for age, gender, education, marital status, and qualification for long-term care insurance. Results: The prevalence was 41.4% for psychological distress and 6.5% for severe psychological distress among all participants. Home visits were significantly associated with a lower risk of psychological distress after adjusting for the covariates. These associations were comparable for men and women. The association was clearer for severe psychological distress. Conclusions: Home visits by commissioned welfare volunteers are significantly associated with a lower risk of psychological distress among older people (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Japan's vision of a 'total care' future looks bright

Author:
HAYASHI Mayumi
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 124(6404), 27 June 2014, pp.25-27.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

Describes the Japanese government's ambitious "2025 vision" for the delivery of health care for its ageing population through the establishment of a localised 'comprehensive "total care" provision. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Relationship between depression and risk of malnutrition among community-dwelling young-old and old-old elderly people

Authors:
YOSHIMURA Kazuya, et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 17(4), 2013, pp.456-460.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

A cross-sectional design was implemented to explores the association between nutritional status and depression among healthy community-dwelling young-old (aged 65–74) and old-old elderly (aged 75 and older). A total of 274 community-dwelling older individuals (142 young-old; 132 old-old) were assessed using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), Mini-Nutritional Assessment Short-Form (MNA-SF) and Life-Space Assessment. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine if depression was independently associated with risk of malnutrition, stratified by age (young-old vs. old-old). In the logistic regression model for young-old, being at risk of malnutrition Was strongly associated with depression. In contrast, in the old-old group, the model was not statistically significant. This study reveals that not only the factors correlated with but also the symptoms of depression may vary among different age stratifications of the elderly. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Ageing and well-being in an international context

Author:
CLIFTON Jonathan
Publisher:
Institute for Public Policy Research
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
36p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The author asks what lessons the UK can learn from several case studies from overseas about how the well-being of older people can be incorporated into a wider range of policy areas than those, traditionally, of pensions, health and social care. For example, in the UK an ageing population brings more focus onto mental health, loneliness and isolation issues, whereas life satisfaction is highest in Japan among those over 65. In addition, case studies from Ireland, the United States, Norway, Finland, New Zealand and China are presented with much variation in findings. Examples of how the well-being of older people can be addressed in the four key areas of relationships, work, learning and the built environment are discussed and put forward by the author as good practice for the future of an ageing population in the UK.

Journal article

Quality of life from the viewpoint of patients with dementia in Japan: nurturing through an acceptance of dementia by patients, their families and care professionals

Authors:
FUKUSHIMA Tetsuhito, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 13(1), January 2005, pp.30-37.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Quality of life (QoL) of patients with dementia was investigated from the patient's viewpoint, and the role of an acceptance of dementia in maintaining important and distinctive elements of QoL was analysed by questionnaire and interview methods. Subjects were 18 patients, 21 family members and 8 staff at a day-care facility in Japan. Patients with dementia hoped to maintain an 'ordinary' way of life. Living peacefully, living together, living healthily and helping each other were considered by them to be important elements of their QoL. Living happily in the present is important, but hopes and expectations for the maintenance of human values in future are of greater importance in their estimation of QoL. Through recognising these needs, a culture and understanding of 'living with dementia' can be nurtured. A dynamic process involving mutual acceptance of dementia in relationships between patients with dementia, their families and care professionals enabled elderly people to surmount their initial troubles and recoup and activate their former humane attitudes. Positive thinking reappeared and new forms of relationships emerged. Patients, families and care professionals came to understand each other better and gained the sense of 'living together'. The process began with 'confronting' the situation and progressed to the final stage of 'acceptance': the patient with dementia was confronted with the dementia itself, the family was confronted with the elderly person as a human being, and the care professional was confronted with her or himself. At first care professionals had felt a sense of social responsibility for delivering justice, but they had gradually noticed that they were themselves relieved of the strain resulting from these attitudes. Acceptance of dementia by the care professional was important in carrying forward this dynamic process, which helps to ensure the desired QoL for the patient with dementia.

Journal article

Expansion of formalised in-home services for Japan's aged

Authors:
ADACHI Kiyoshi, LUBBEN James E., TSUKADA Noriko
Journal article citation:
Journal of Aging and Social Policy, 8(2/3), 1997, pp.147-159.
Publisher:
Routledge
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Analyses the social and political forces in Japan that led to the creation of the Gold Plan, a comprehensive national plan for formalised in-home services for the aged. Examines the political strategies of the Gold Plan from the perspectives of the shift from institutional to in-home services; decentralisation of in-home services policy; and needs for expanding the number of in-home service workers. New nonprofit organisations called Resident-Participation Types (RPTs) are identified, which are self-help organisations to augment the delivery of in-home services to the aged. Finally, future issues regarding RPTs and in-home services for the aged and some policy recommendations are discussed.

Journal article

Meeting the challenges of retirement and integrating the disabled into the community

Authors:
VASOO S., TIONG Tan Ngoh
Journal article citation:
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work, 6(1), March 1996, pp.1-5.
Publisher:
Times Academic

In view of future shortages of manpower and slower growth of populations in countries like Korea, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Australia and New Zealand, it is expected that the question of retirement from work will receive more attention. Discusses the issue of the ageing workforce and introduces special issue on social security and family concerns.

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