Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Journal article

Effectiveness of integrative and instrumental reminiscence therapies on depression symptoms reduction in institutionalized older adults: an empirical study

Authors:
KARIMI H., et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 14(7), September 2010, pp.881-887.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Reminiscence therapy is a psychological intervention which is specifically designed to address issues of particular relevance to older adults, such as depression. Integrative reminiscence is a process that promotes acceptance of self and others, conflict resolution and reconciliation, a sense of meaning and self-worth, and the integration of the present and past. Instrumental reminiscence involves remembering past plans and goal-directed activities, recalling how one dealt with past problems, and drawing from past experience to solve the present problems. The aim of this study was to examine the therapeutic effectiveness of these two types of reminiscence interventions for the treatment of depression in institutionalised older adults dwelling in a nursing home. These interventions were implemented in a short-term (6 sessions) group format and compared to an active social discussion control group. The participants were 29 residents of Kahrizak Nursing Home in Iran with depressive symptoms varying from mild to severe who were randomly assigned to 1 of the 3 groups. Analysis of changes from pre-test to post-test revealed that integrative reminiscence therapy led to statistically significant reduction in symptoms of depression in contrast with the control group. Although instrumental reminiscence therapy also reduced depressive symptoms, this improvement was not statistically significant. The study provides support for the effectiveness of integrative reminiscence therapy as an intervention for depressed older adults living in residential care settings.

Journal article

Laughter yoga versus group exercise program in elderly depressed women: a randomized controlled trial

Authors:
SHAHIDI Mahvash, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 26(3), March 2011, pp.322-327.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Laughter Yoga, founded by Kataria, is a combination of unconditional laughter and yogic breathing and has been shown to have beneficial effects on both mental and physical health. This study compared the effectiveness of Kataria's Laughter Yoga and group exercise therapy on depression and life satisfaction in older women of a cultural community in Tehran. Seventy depressed women (aged 60-80 years) selected using the Geriatric Depression Scale completed a Life Satisfaction Scale pre-test and demographic questionnaire. They were randomised to one of three groups; ten session of laughter therapy, ten sessions of aerobic exercise therapy or a control group. Post-test depression and life satisfaction scores were analysed for the 60 subjects who completed the study. This revealed a significant difference in the decrease in depression scores of both the Laughter Yoga and exercise therapy groups in comparison to the control group but no significant difference between the two intervention groups. The increase in life satisfaction of the Laughter Yoga group showed a significant difference in comparison with the control group. These findings suggest that Laughter Yoga is at least as effective as a group exercise program in improving depression and life satisfaction in elderly women.

Journal article

Older people's needs following major disasters: a qualitative study of Iranian elders' experiences of the Bam earthquake

Authors:
ARDALAN Ali, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 30(1), January 2010, pp.11-23.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This paper reports a qualitative study of the self-perceived needs of older people in the aftermath of the Bam earthquake in Iran in 2003. A total of 56 people aged from 65 to 88 years were recruited to the study using purposive sampling, including 29 men and 27 women. Six focus group discussions and ten semi-structured individual interviews were conducted. The analysis identified four major themes among the informants' concerns: inappropriate service delivery, affronts to dignity, feeling insecure and emotional distress. Disaster-prone areas need to be appropriately prepared with culturally sensitive plans to meet the needs of those who suffer from their effects, not least older people. For many older people in a disaster zone, customary forms of relief are neither required nor appropriate. Relief agencies need to be trained to be age-sensitive and should mainstream older people's rights in the planning and implementation of both the response and recovery phases of assistance.

Journal article

Reliability, validity and factor structure of the GDS-15 in Iranian elderly

Authors:
MALAKOUTI Seyed Kazem, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 21(6), June 2006, pp.588-593.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Depressive disorders are a public health problem even in developing countries. Access to valid and reliable screening instruments is needed for conducting community surveys. The main objective of this study is to provide the Iranian version of the Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS).  The GDS-15 Farsi version was developed by translation and back translation. Two hundred and four subjects aged 59 years or older, who were chosen randomly from residents of the Ekbatan district of Tehran, the capital city of Iran, completed the GDS-15. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used to establish a gold standard diagnosis of major depressive disorders. The GDS was found to be an internally consistent measure. Alpha, split-half coefficients and test-retest reliability were 0.9, 0.89 and 0.58 respectively. Two factors were extracted by using factor analysis and the principle component analysis (varimax rotation): depression and psychosocial activity. The Depression factor (omitting items 2, 9, 10, 13), which could be considered as a short form of the scale ( = 0.92), has significant correlation with the main scale (r = 0.58). Using receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis, the optimum cutoff score for GDS-15 is 7/8, yielding a sensitivity of 0.9 and a specificity of 0.84. The optimum cutoff score for GDS-11 is 6, yielding a sensitivity of 0.9 and a specificity of 0.83. The long and short forms of the GDS have excellent properties as screening instruments for major depression in older dwellers in Iran, particularly in urban areas, as presented in our findings.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts