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Journal article

Establishing the well-being of the rural-urban elderly population: a case study of Indonesia

Authors:
MOHD Saidatulakmal, et al
Journal article citation:
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, 44(2), Winter 2010, pp.105-120.
Publisher:
World Scientific Publishing Company
Place of publication:
Singapore

Indonesia is experiencing an aging population due to longer life expectancy and a decline in fertility. This paper examines the influence of various demographic factors (age, marital status, social class and perceived health) and economic conditions as well as living and familial arrangements on the well-being of the elderly. Data was collected from 302 elderly people covering the rural and urban areas of Jakarta, Yogyakarta and Bali using a survey-interview method. The participants were: 157 elderly with a mean age of 70 in the urban areas; and 145 elderly with a mean age of 74 in the rural areas. A causal model of well-being was employed to analyse the data obtained. The model of well-being was then tested using path analysis to test the causal relationships among the variables. In general, the well-being of the elderly in the urban and rural areas did not show much difference. The causal model of well-being of elderly in the rural areas indicated direct relationships between well-being and age, living arrangement and social status. The causal model of well-being of elderly in the urban areas were more complex, showing direct relationships between well-being and age, familial arrangement, social status and perceived health.

Journal article

A framework for understanding old-age vulnerabilities

Authors:
SCHRÖDER-BUTTERFILL Elizabeth, MARIANTI Ruly
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 26(1), January 2006, pp.9-35.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This article reviews how the concept of vulnerability had been developed in various disciplines. It goes on to develop a framework which captures those aspects of a vulnerability approach which are most relevant to the study of ageing. The article then examines these domains with reference to the research literature on ageing and old age: what might be meant by outcomes, exposure, threats and coping capacities with reference to older people. The article finally 're-assembles' the concept through two examples, one based on work on vulnerability to homelessness in old age in Britain, and the other on vulnerability to a lack of care in old age, which draws on the authors work in Indonesia.

Journal article

Old-age vulnerability, ill-health and care support in urban areas of Indonesia

Author:
VAN EEUWIJK Peter
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 26(1), January 2006, pp.61-80.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This paper reports a study of the care and support received by chronically ill older people in urban areas of North Sulawesi, Indonesia. The results found that the majority rely on close family members, most often a wife or a daughter (or both), to provide treatment, care and support. The main care activities are support with ‘activities of daily living’ and therapies for specific illnesses. Care-givers experience manifold burdens when providing care for frail older people, and tend to reduce their support as the severity and duration of their relative's illness increases. It is shown that an older person's vulnerability to inadequate care provision, or its withdrawal, is associated with marital status and gender (unmarried women and widows being most at risk), poverty, weak support networks, and having care-givers who are themselves vulnerable.

Journal article

Migration, social structure and old-age support networks: a comparison of three Indonesian communities

Author:
KREAGER Philip
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 26(1), January 2006, pp.37-60.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Contemporary trends in population ageing and urbanisation in the developing world imply that the extensive out-migration of young people from rural areas coincides with, and is likely to exacerbate, a rise in the older share of the rural population. This paper examines the impact of migration on vulnerability at older ages by drawing on the results of anthropological and demographic field studies in three Indonesian communities. The methodology for identifying vulnerable older people has a progressively sharper focus, beginning first with important differences between the communities, then examining variations by socio-economic strata, and finally the variability of older people's family networks. Comparative analysis indicates considerable heterogeneity in past and present migration patterns, both within and between villages. The migrants' contributions are a normal and important component of older people's support, often in combination with those of local family members. Higher status families are commonly able to reinforce their position by making better use of migration opportunities than the less advantaged. Although family networks in the poorer strata may effect some redistribution of the children's incomes, their social networks are smaller and insufficient to overcome their marked disadvantages. Vulnerability thus arises where several factors, including migration histories, result in unusually small networks, and when the migrations are within rural areas.

Book

Key issues in cross-cultural psychology: selected papers from the Twelfth International Congress of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology held in Pamplona-Iruna, Navarra, Spain

Editors:
GRAD Hector, BLANCO Amalio, GEAORGAS James
Publisher:
Swets and Zeitlinger
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
386p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Abingdon

Comparative study looking at a wide range of psychological issues worldwide. Contains papers divided into 6 sections: conceptual and methodological issues; consequences of acculturation; cognitive processes; values; social psychology; and personality, developmental psychology, and health psychology.

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