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Journal article

The outdoor mobility and leisure activities of older people in five European countries

Authors:
GAGLIARDI Christina, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 27(5), September 2007, pp.683-700.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Many gerontological studies have dealt with the leisure activities of older people and they have generated many important theories. Although outdoor activities and mobility promote good health in old age, both decrease with increasing age as people lose physical and mental functions. This paper examines the outdoor and indoor leisure activities of 3,950 older adults and their variations by personal and environmental characteristics in Germany, Finland, Hungary, The Netherlands and Italy. The main dimensions of activity were established by factor analysis, and in all countries four factors were found: home activities, hobbies, social activities, and sports activities. Both similar and distinctive pursuits characterised each dimension among the five countries. ‘Home activities’ mainly comprised indoor activities, but the other three dimensions involved more physical mobility. The scores of various socio-environmental characteristics on the factors enabled the attributes of the participants to be profiled. Sports activities and hobbies were performed more often by younger men, by those with good physical functioning and by those who drove cars. Social activities were performed more by women and those who used public transport. Home activities were more frequently performed by those with low physical function and women.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Managing change together

Author:
WARWICK John
Journal article citation:
NISW Noticeboard, Spring 1999, pp.14-15.
Publisher:
National Institute for Social Work

Since the fall of communism in 1991, countries of central and eastern Europe have been struggling with change and transition on many fronts. For the last five years NISW has been working in partnership with Hungarian colleagues on programmes aimed at improving social services to older people. Looks at what has been involved in the partnership project.

Book Full text available online for free

Long-term care quality assurance policies in European countries

Authors:
DANDI Roberto, et al
Publisher:
European Network of Economic Policy Research Institutes
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
89p.
Place of publication:
Brussels

This report present the findings and conclusions of research undertaken in the context of research projects carried out by a consortium of ENEPRI member institutes. This report is a contribution to Work Package 5 of the ANCIEN project, which focuses on the future of long-term care for the elderly in Europe. This report analyses the quality assurance policies for long-term care (LTC) in the following countries: Austria, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. First, it discusses quality assurance in LTC by analysing: the dimensions of quality, the policy frameworks for quality in LTC, the different levels of development of LTC quality policies at the international, national, organisational, and individual levels. Second, it describes the methodology for collecting and analysing data on quality policies in the selected countries. Finally, it discusses the results, identifying four clusters of countries based on quality policies and indicators for LTC. These clusters are compared to the clusters identified in Work Package 1 of the ANCIEN project. Policy recommendations are proposed.

Book Full text available online for free

Quality assurance indicators of long-term care in European countries

Authors:
DANDI Roberto, CASANOVA Georgia
Publisher:
European Network of Economic Policy Research Institutes
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
128p.
Place of publication:
Brussels

This report present the findings and conclusions of research undertaken in the context of research projects carried out by a consortium of ENEPRI member institutes. This report is a contribution to Work Package 5 of the ANCIEN project, which focuses on the future of long-term care for the elderly in Europe. The report presents the quality indicators that were collected by the ANCIEN project partners in each country. The main contribution of this report is a classification of the quality assurance indicators in different European countries according to three dimensions: organisation type; quality dimensions; and system dimensions. The countries that provided quality indicators, which are used at a national level or are recommended to be used at a local level by a national authority, are: Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. In total, 390 quality indicators were collected. Each quality indicator has been assigned to one or more options in each dimension.

Journal article

Interest in working with the elderly: a cross-national study of graduating social work students

Author:
WEISS Idit
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work Education, 41(3), 2005, pp.379-391.
Publisher:
Council on Social Work Education

This article presents a cross-national study of social work students' interest in working with the elderly, based on a sample of 679 graduating BSW students from 7 countries: Australia, Brazil, England, Germany, Hungary, Israel, and the United States. The findings among all the national cohorts show that the motivation to work with the elderly was lower than motivation to work with any other age group, and that it was equally low in most of the countries. The findings support the growing concern that the social work profession may not be able to meet its obligations to the aging society.

Book

Progress through partnership

Editor:
LEVAI Katalin
Publisher:
The Social Innovation Foundation
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
153p.
Place of publication:
Budapest

Report of a joint project between the National Institute for Social Work and organisations in Hungary representing social welfare services, research, and training and education. The work involved looking at reforming health and welfare services in the context the political changes taking place in Hungary. The project went forward in several phases: inception; research; training; and dissemination. Describes the project; and looks at the development of services for older people in Hungary.

Book

Minority elderly care in Europe: country profiles

Editors:
PATEL Naina, (ed.)
Publisher:
Policy Research Institute on Ageing and Ethnicity
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
232p.
Place of publication:
London

Researchers in ten countries (Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland and the UK)  examine 27 minority groups over a three-year period, looking at social and welfare structures, health, employment and living conditions. This project is the first venture to begin compiling information on minority elders on such a scale. While the experiences of each country are distinct, there are undoubtedly similarities that can be drawn in terms of poor access to housing, lower paid employment and a worse state of health. The project involves minority groups who came from former colonial possessions in the post-war period and those who have arrived more recently, fleeing war and dispossession. It also examines the provision of groups who have known no other homeland yet are endemically discriminated against, such as the Roma.

Journal article

Eligibility criteria for cash assistance for older and disabled people in Hungary: a model for countries in passage from a planned to a market economy

Authors:
LANDAU Ruth, GUTTMAN David, TALYIGAS Katalin
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 28(2), April 1998, pp.233-246.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Discusses how the political and economic changes presently taking place in the Central and Eastern European countries are accompanied by profound social changes which impact hardest on the well-being of older and disabled people. Based on the experience of a Hungarian non-governmental social agency, a model for eligibility criteria for cash assistance for vulnerable peoples is suggested.

Book Full text available online for free

A good place to grow older: synthesis report: Peer Review in Social Protection and Social Inclusion 2010, London, 18-19 January 2011

Authors:
HOKEMA Anna, TESCH-ROMER Clemens
Publisher:
Peer Review in Social Protection and Social Inclusion
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
40p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Vienna

Peer Reviews are a key instrument of the EU framework ‘the open method of coordination’. They aim to enable open discussion on social protection and social inclusion policies in the different EU Member States and facilitate the mutual learning process among them. This publication reports on a Peer Review held in London in January 2011 which focused on strategies for building ‘a good place to grow older’. The Peer Review was hosted by the UK Department for Work and Pensions and also involved representatives from Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Romania and Spain. This publication covers: the policy debate at European level; the main elements of the UK’s policy; the experiences in peer countries and stakeholder contributions; and discussions at the Peer Review meeting covering UK policy reforms (including pension reform and reforms to health and social care), the role of ‘Big Society’, and the principles behind the reforms. The main conclusions and key lessons to emerge from the Peer Review relate to: the transferability of the UK reforms; older people as a societal resource; old age as part of life’s course; diversity; active ageing and the extension of working life; volunteering; partnerships across sectors; the role of stakeholder organisations; access to information; the role of the environment; and strategies for scaling up pilot projects.

Book Full text available online for free

Minority elderly health and social care in Europe: summary findings of the minority elderly care (MEC) project

Editors:
PATEL Naina, (ed.)
Publisher:
Policy Research Institute on Ageing and Ethnicity
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
13p.
Place of publication:
Bolton

This report, using data from the United Kingdom, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Finland, Hungary, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and Switzerland, is designed to inform and help plan the nature and direction of provision of health and social care services in the years to come. The project has the explicit intention of seeking to draw attention to the needs of minority ethnic (ME) elders and thereby improve the provision of services for them throughout Europe. Key findings showed that family was very important to ME elders in all countries and not surprisingly, most elders preferred to be looked after by their family in their own home. It is apparent that in every country there were significant proportions of ME elders on low incomes which were substantially less than the average incomes for elderly in the country concerned. In all countries there were quite significant proportions who described their general health as poor or very poor and these elders needed more medical treatment. The use of different health and social care services is not uniform across the different ethnic groups and countries. While each country has its own systems and procedures it is apparent that in all countries there are some elders who are failing to gain access to services. There are several things an organisation can do to help ME elders to overcome barriers and gain access to services. For example, information can be provided in appropriate languages, staff can be given training in culture-specific care, or new services may be designed specifically to meet the needs of different ME groups. The report makes several recommendations including the provision of clear information about the rights of the individual in accessing and using health and social care services and in different formats and languages. Adopt a person centred approach to patients and service users. Recognise that certain ethnic groups face particularly strong access barriers. Each of the issues is described in detail for each country included in the report.

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