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Book

Family care of the elderly: social and cultural changes

Editor:
KOSBERG Jordan I.
Publisher:
Sage
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
329p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Newbury Park, CA

Takes a global look at care for older people within the family circle, and compares and contrasts global changes in the last decade.

Book

Contrasting European policies for the care of the elderly

Editors:
JAMIESON Anne, ILLSLEY Raymond
Publisher:
Avebury
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
199p., tables, bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Looks at Belgium, Denmark, France, Greece, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, and the UK. Part 1 examines the relationship between formal and informal care, Part 2 deals with care systems and care delivery problems. Includes chapter by Ian Sinclair, Peter Gorbach, Enid Levin and Jenny Williams: 'Community care and residential admissions: results from two empirical studies'.

Journal article

'Professionalizing' the work of family carers of dependent, older people

Authors:
TRIANTAFILLOU Judith, MESTHENEOS Elizabeth
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 2(4), July 1994, pp.257-262.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Looks at the ways in which primary health and social care workers could 'professionalize' the work of family carers in order to achieve: more efficient caring techniques; more professional attitudes, including the avoidance of over involvement in their work; and an empowerment of carers.

Book

The economics of care of the elderly

Authors:
PACOLET Jozef, WILDERCOM Celeste
Publisher:
Avebury
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
241p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

Set of papers given at a colloquium in March 1990 in Brussels, where a group of economists presented their theoretical and empirical progress on an EC initiated project on the care of elderly people. Divided into 4 parts: part 1: the ageing population and the organisation of the welfare state: macro economic analysis; part 2: significance of informal care of elderly people; part 3: how to meet the needs of elderly people: relevance of micro-economic analysis; and part 4: policy formation for older people. This section includes comparative studies of Belgium, Denmark, Spain, France, West Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and the United Kingdom.

Book Full text available online for free

Analysing equity in the use of long-term care in Europe

Authors:
RODRIGUES Ricardo, ILINCA Stefania, SCHMIDT Andrea
Publisher:
European Commission
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
39
Place of publication:
Brussels

There are significant differences across social protection systems in Europe in the scope, breadth and depth of coverage of the risk to need long-term care in old-age. Together with other factors, such as education, household structure or societal values regarding care for frail older people, these differences can have a significant impact on the use of long-term care. Using SHARE data, this Research Note compares differences between European countries in the use of long-term care across income groups, for older people living at home. It analyses not only inequalities in the use of long-term care, but also differences in use that persist after differences in need have been taken into consideration, i.e. horizontal inequity. For this purpose, concentration indices, concentration curves and horizontal inequity indices are estimated for home care services and informal care. The countries analysed here are Austria, Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, Spain, Italy, France, Denmark, Greece, Belgium and Czech Republic. The findings suggest that differences in use of home care services across income groups mostly reflect differences in need between those same groups. For informal care, the differences in use persist even after accounting for needs, and less affluent individuals are much more likely to use informal care. Some possible causes for these differences and policy implications are considered.

Journal article

Comparison of health-related quality of life and associated psychological factors between younger and older patients with established rheumatic disorders

Authors:
GOULIA Panagiota, et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 14(7), September 2010, pp.819-827.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The cross-sectional study involved 320 patients with various rheumatic disorders who were attending a follow-up clinic at the University Hospital of Ioannina. HRQOL (health-related quality of life) was assessed by the 26-item World Health Organisation Quality of Life Instrument (WHOQOL-BREF), and functional limitations, psychological distress, defence mechanisms, sense of coherence, and interpersonal difficulties were also assessed. The results showed that older patients presented more impaired physical HRQOL and social relationships HRQOL independent of disease type, education, and pain. Functional limitations were more prominent in the older group. Pain, functional limitations, and psychological distress were independently associated with physical HRQOL in both groups. Psychological distress was the only common independent correlate of social relationships HRQOL. Personality factors were significant correlates of physical and social relationships HRQOLs only in the younger group, while the impact of pain in physical HRQOL was greater for younger than older patients. The article concludes that older patients with rheumatic diseases experience more impaired HRQOL than the younger ones, and the management and prevention of functional limitations and psychological distress should be a priority.

Journal article

Socio-economic inequalities in physical functioning: a comparative study of English and Greek elderly men

Authors:
TABASSUM Faiza, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 29(7), October 2009, pp.1123-1140.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

The associations between socio-economic position (SEP) and physical functioning have frequently been investigated but little is known about which measures of SEP are the best to use for older people. This study examined how different SEP indicators related to the physical functioning of men aged 50 or more years in England and Greece. The data derived from Wave 1 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) and from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Self-reported physical functioning limitations and mobility difficulties were combined and categorised into ‘no disability’, ‘mild disability’ and ‘severe disability’. The SEP indicators studied were: wealth, educational level and occupational class. The findings indicate that respondents with less wealth, fewer educational qualifications and lower occupational class were more likely to experience mild or severe physical disability than those of high SEP. When all three measures of SEP were adjusted for each other, in both samples wealth maintained a strong association with mild and severe disability, while education was associated with severe disability but only among English men. Occupational class was not strongly associated with physical disability in either case. Hence, among English and Greek older men, wealth was a more important predictor of physical functioning difficulties than either occupational class or education.

Journal article

Family carers' experiences using support services in Europe: empirical evidence from the EUROFAMCARE study

Authors:
LAMURA Giovanni, et al
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 48(6), December 2008, pp.752-771.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

This article explores the experiences of family carers of older people in using support services in six European countries: Germany, Greece, Italy, Poland, Sweden, and the UK. Following a common protocol, data were collected from national samples of approximately 1,000 family carers per country and clustered into comparable subgroups to facilitate cross-national analysis. Carers' use of available support services is limited across Europe but is considerably higher in Germany, Sweden, and the UK than in Poland, Greece, and Italy. Service use is more prevalent among wives and carers with stronger support networks and less frequent among working daughters with high levels of burden, suggesting the need for a reconsideration of eligibility criteria and better targeting of service responses. Access to and use of services is characterized by a divide between carers in northwestern Europe, who experience few difficulties other than the older person's refusal to accept the support offered, and carers in southeastern Europe, where service affordability and poor transportation present remarkable barriers. Concerns regarding the timeliness and quality of support are common to all countries. European Union-wide efforts to improve carer support need to focus on improving the care system's ability to provide timely, high-quality care delivered by staff who treat the older person with dignity and respect, and to enhance cooperation between health professionals (in all countries), informal networks (especially in southeastern Europe), social services (particularly in Sweden and the UK), and voluntary organizations (in Germany and the UK).

Journal article

Dealing with older workers in Europe: a comparative survey of employers' attitudes and actions

Authors:
VAN DALEN Hendrik P., HENKENS Kene, SCHIPPERS Joop
Journal article citation:
Journal of European Social Policy, 19(1), February 2009, pp.47-60.
Publisher:
Sage

This article addresses employers' attitudes and actions regarding the position of older workers. A comparative survey among employers from four European countries - Greece, Spain, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom - is used to examine their expectations with respect to the ageing of the workforce, the productivity of older workers and their recruitment and retention behaviour regarding this cohort. The results show that in spite of the perceived challenges ahead (including the ageing workforce), employers take no substantial measures to retain and recruit older workers or improve their productivity. Only employers in the United Kingdom seem to recognize older workers as a valuable source of labour supply and act accordingly.

Journal article

Older people's views of falls-prevention interventions in six European countries

Authors:
YARDLEY Lucy, et al
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 46(5), October 2006, pp.650-660.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

This study conducted semi-structured interviews to assess perceived advantages and barriers to taking part in falls-related interventions were carried out in six European countries (Denmark, the Netherlands, Germany, Greece, Switzerland and United Kingdom) with 69 people aged 68 to 97 years. The sample was selected to include people with very different experiences of participation or nonparticipation in falls-related interventions, but all individuals were asked about interventions that included strength and balance training. The results found attitudes were similar in all countries and contexts. People were motivated to participate in strength and balance training by a wide range of perceived benefits (interest and enjoyment, improved health, mood, and independence) and not just reduction of falling risk. Participation also was encouraged by a personal invitation from a health practitioner and social approval from family and friends. Barriers to participation included denial of falling risk, the belief that no additional falls-prevention measures were necessary, practical barriers to attendance at groups (e.g., transport, effort, and cost), and a dislike of group activities. Implications: Because many older people reject the idea that they are at risk of falling, the uptake of strength and balance training programs may be promoted more effectively by maximizing and emphasizing their multiple positive benefits for health and well-being. A personal invitation from a health professional to participate is important, and it also may be helpful to provide home-based programs for those who dislike or find it difficult to attend groups.

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