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Journal article

Problems of training and cooperation in social work with elderly people in the EC countries Germany, France, the United Kingdom and Spain: a report from a research project

Authors:
ELIAS Gabriele, et al
Journal article citation:
Issues in Social Work Education, 12(1), Spring 1992, pp.24-51.
Publisher:
Association of Teachers in Social Work Education

Reports on a study based on a postal survey of social work training institutions in Germany, France, the U.K. and Spain. The findings are presented country-by-country and concurrently discussed in the context of the overall picture which emerges. Issues concerning basic and post-qualifying training and research in the field of social work with elderly people are examined. A diversity of provision for, and variation of the development status of, this area of social work training is identified.

Journal article

Elderly people's care in Germany

Author:
BROOKE-ROSS R.
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 21(3), 1987, pp.244-251.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

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Journal article

The relationship between women’s work histories and incomes in later life in the UK, US and West Germany

Authors:
SEFTON Tom, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of European Social Policy, 21(1), February 2011, pp.20-36.
Publisher:
Sage

This study examines the relationship between employment history and the personal income of older women in the UK, US and West Germany. It compares three countries with different welfare and pension systems, and aims to achieve a better understanding of the interaction between the life course, pension system and women’s incomes in later life. The study draws on data from longitudinal surveys, and includes 1,418 samples from the UK, 1,127 from the US and 2,270 from Germany. Findings reveal that the association between older women’s incomes and employment history is strongest in West Germany and weakest in the UK, where there is evidence of a pensions poverty trap and where only predominantly full-time employment is associated with significantly higher incomes in later life. Employment history matters less for widows in all three countries and more for recent birth cohorts and more educated women in the UK only. In ending, the paper discusses the adequacy of the treatment of women under different pension systems.

Journal article

At risk alcohol drinking in primary care patients aged 75 years and older

Authors:
WEYERER Siegfried, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 24(12), December 2009, pp.1376-1385.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This study looks at alcohol consumption patterns among older patients.  The subjects were 3,224 non-demented patients aged 75 and over attending general practitioners in 6 cities in Germany. Detailed assessment of alcohol consumption was determined by structured clinical interviews.  The results showed that 50.1% were abstainers and that 43.4% were moderate drinkers.  The prevalence of at-risk alcohol consumption (over 20g alcohol per day for women and over 30g alcohol per day for men) was 6.5%.  This was significantly higher for men (12.1%) than women (3.6%).  Compared to moderate drinking, at-risk drinking was significantly higher in men, individuals with liver disease, and current smokers. Apart from the liver disease, at-risk drinking in this population was associated with relatively good physical and mental health. The authors suggest that public prevention measures should focus on at-risk drinkers to make them aware of potential risks of high alcohol consumption in old age.

Journal article

A salutogenic view on subjective well-being in active elderly persons

Authors:
WIESMANN Ulrich, HANNICH Hans-Joachim
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 12(1), January 2008, pp.56-65.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Subjective well-being as an indicator for successful aging is investigated from a salutogenic perspective that states that the sense of coherence plays a key role for psychological adaptation. It should be demonstrated that the sense of coherence mediates the relationship between generalized resistance resources and subjective well-being. One-hundred-and-seventy psychophysically active elderly persons (37 men) in Germany filled out a questionnaire assessing the sense of coherence, subjective well-being and resistance resources (such as age, education, physical health, activity level, social support and personality variables). It was found that resources co-varied with the sense of coherence and subjective well-being, accounting for 52 and 48% of the variance, respectively. The most important predictors were self-efficacy, self-esteem and education. After controlling for resources, the sense of coherence accounted for an additional 6% of the variance in well-being. The sense of coherence clearly mediated the relationship between resources and well-being. The findings corroborate the salutogenic idea that the sense of coherence creates, or maintains, a form of psychological integrity as represented by subjective well-being. The promotion of a strong sense of coherence should be a major aim of gerontological interventions.

Journal article

The outdoor mobility and leisure activities of older people in five European countries

Authors:
GAGLIARDI Christina, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 27(5), September 2007, pp.683-700.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Many gerontological studies have dealt with the leisure activities of older people and they have generated many important theories. Although outdoor activities and mobility promote good health in old age, both decrease with increasing age as people lose physical and mental functions. This paper examines the outdoor and indoor leisure activities of 3,950 older adults and their variations by personal and environmental characteristics in Germany, Finland, Hungary, The Netherlands and Italy. The main dimensions of activity were established by factor analysis, and in all countries four factors were found: home activities, hobbies, social activities, and sports activities. Both similar and distinctive pursuits characterised each dimension among the five countries. ‘Home activities’ mainly comprised indoor activities, but the other three dimensions involved more physical mobility. The scores of various socio-environmental characteristics on the factors enabled the attributes of the participants to be profiled. Sports activities and hobbies were performed more often by younger men, by those with good physical functioning and by those who drove cars. Social activities were performed more by women and those who used public transport. Home activities were more frequently performed by those with low physical function and women.

Journal article

A multidimensional scale for the measurement of agreement with age stereotypes and the salience of age in social interaction

Authors:
KRUSE Andreas, SCHMITT Eric
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 26(3), May 2006, pp.393-411.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This paper presents a new scale for the assessment of the salience of age in social interaction and of levels of agreement with four age stereotypical assertions, about the characteristics of people in the ‘third age’ and the ‘fourth age’, about older people's social roles and social participation, and about the problems for society produced by population ageing. The scale was constructed by testing the agreement of a national sample of 804 German respondents aged 41–84 years with over 60 item-statements in two pilot studies. The final scale has 24 items, and was tested using a stratified sample of 1,275 subjects aged 40–75 years. Five postulated subscales were confirmed using principal components analysis: ‘age salience’ in social interaction, old age as a time of ‘developmental gains and potentials of development’, old age as a time of ‘developmental losses and risks of development’, ‘the social downgrading of older people’, and believing that ‘older people are a burden on society’. For age stereotypes and age salience, no significant sex differences were found, but those aged 58–64 years held more optimistic views about old age and population ageing than both the younger and the older age groups (with no differences between the latter). Moreover, age stereotypes and age salience varied by several social-economic variables, particularly occupational status, the rate of unemployment in the region of residence, and being resident in the eastern or western part of Germany. No significant interactions between age group and sex were found for any of the five subscales.

Journal article

The role of the 'trusted stranger' in DCM feedback

Author:
MULLER-HERGI Christian
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dementia Care, 12(2), March 2004, pp.18-19.
Publisher:
Hawker

Outlines some of the challenges about the feedback process in Dementia Care Mapping, and provides information on developments in Germany.

Book

Building for choice

Authors:
THOMAS Caroline, ROOSE Tracey
Publisher:
Anchor Trust
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
44p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Kidlington

Review considering ways in which housing can make independent living easier for older people. The report is aimed at developers, designers, managers and policy makers from the health and social care sectors, as well as housing. Draws examples from schemes from the Netherlands, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

Book

Long-term care for the elderly: Britain and Germany compared

Authors:
EVERS Adalbert, HARDING Tessa
Publisher:
Anglo-German Foundation for the Study of Industrial Society
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
28p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

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