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Journal article

Problems of training and cooperation in social work with elderly people in the EC countries Germany, France, the United Kingdom and Spain: a report from a research project

Authors:
ELIAS Gabriele, et al
Journal article citation:
Issues in Social Work Education, 12(1), Spring 1992, pp.24-51.
Publisher:
Association of Teachers in Social Work Education

Reports on a study based on a postal survey of social work training institutions in Germany, France, the U.K. and Spain. The findings are presented country-by-country and concurrently discussed in the context of the overall picture which emerges. Issues concerning basic and post-qualifying training and research in the field of social work with elderly people are examined. A diversity of provision for, and variation of the development status of, this area of social work training is identified.

Journal article

Ambulatory actigraphy correlates with apathy in mild Alzheimer’s disease

Authors:
DAVID Renaud, et al
Journal article citation:
Dementia: the International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 9(4), November 2010, pp.509-516.
Publisher:
Sage

Research has revealed apathy as one of the most common behavioural symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This study examined the relationship between apathy and locomotor activity in mild AD. Thirty AD subjects and fifteen healthy controls were recruited from the Nice Memory Center, France. Apathy was assessed with the Apathy Inventory (AI). Patients with a score greater than three on the AI caregiver version are considered in this report as having apathy. Locomotor activity was assessed using a wrist-worn actigraph for 75 minutes, during which a neuropsychological and behavioural examination were performed followed by 15 minutes of free activity. Findings revealed that AD patients shown lower motor activity than healthy subjects. AD patients with apathy had lower motor activity than AD patients without apathy. Apathy total score correlated negatively with mean motor activity. Most of the total score correlation was accounted for by correlations between the apathy dimensions lack of initiative and lack of interest, with mean motor activity. It is suggested that ambulatory actigraphy could be a simple technique to assess apathy objectively as part of routine assessment of Alzheimer’s disease patients.

Journal article

The inter-relationship between formal and informal care: a study in France and Israel

Authors:
LITWIN Howard, ATTIAS-DONFUT Claudine
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 29(1), January 2009, pp.71-91.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This study examined whether formal care services delivered to frail older people's homes in France and Israel substitute for or complement informal support. The two countries have comparable family welfare systems but many historical, cultural and religious differences. Data for the respondents aged 75 or more years at the first wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) were analysed. Regressions were examined of three patterns of care from outside the household: informal support only, formal support only and both formal and informal care, with the predictor variables including whether informal help was provided by a family member living in the household. The results revealed that about one-half of the respondents received no help at all (France 51%, Israel 55%), about one-tenth received care from a household member (France 8%, Israel 10%), and one-third were helped by informal carers from outside the household (France 34%, Israel 33%). More French respondents (35%) received formal care services at home than Israelis (27%). Most predictors of the care patterns were similar in the two countries. The analysis showed that complementarity is a common outcome of the co-existence of formal and informal care, and that mixed provision occurs more frequently in situations of greater need. It is also shown that spouse care-givers had less formal home-care supports than either co-resident children or other family care-givers. Even so, spouses, children and other family care-givers all had considerable support from formal home-delivered care.

Journal article

Preferences for routines in older people: associations with cognitive and psychological vulnerability

Authors:
BERGUA Valerie, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 21(10), October 2006, pp.990-998.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Although routine activities are important to normal functioning across all phases of life, their expression in older people may be associated with cognitive and psychological vulnerability. The relationship between these variables was explored in 235 elderly French participants from the PAQUID cohort study. Cross-sectional positive associations were found between preferences for routines, anxiety and depression levels, and cognitive complaints. General cognitive decline over a three-year time span was also associated with a greater desire for routines at the end of this period. The progressive routinization of behaviours and activities in older people is discussed as a marker of affective and cognitive vulnerability, and its understanding has potential for improving the early detection of adaptation difficulties and overall care in this population.

Book

Gradual retirement in the OECD countries: macro and micro issues and policies

Editors:
DELSEN Lei, REDAY-MULVEY Genevieve
Publisher:
Dartmouth
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
223p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

Uses comparative analysis of evidence from Sweden, France, Germany, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Japan and the USA to look at future directions for policy on the employment of older people. Places this in the context of current trends towards retirement at a variety of ages.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Elder abuse in France

Author:
OGG Jim
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Europe, 2(3), 1995, pp.8-11.
Publisher:
Russell House

In France many health and social care practitioners are becoming aware that despite considerable economic resources directed towards health and social care provision for old age, there is a widening gap between those who receive an adequate or more than adequate level of services and those who are excluded. For those older people faced with disability or ill health, home and family will be their main source of support. A growth in unregulated private home-care by individuals and agencies means that this sector mostly consists of untrained and unqualified staff with no support. The possibility of abuse and exploitation in such circumstances therefore remains open. This article investigates elder abuse in France and ways in which French health, social and legal services operate in promoting the welfare of older people.

Journal article

Concluding commentary

Author:
LEAPER Robert
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 27(3), September 1993, pp.257-265.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Draws conclusions from a series of companion studies on the views of older people in cities in the United Kingdom, Eire, Belgium and France.

Book

Contrasting European policies for the care of the elderly

Editors:
JAMIESON Anne, ILLSLEY Raymond
Publisher:
Avebury
Publication year:
1990
Pagination:
199p., tables, bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Looks at Belgium, Denmark, France, Greece, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, and the UK. Part 1 examines the relationship between formal and informal care, Part 2 deals with care systems and care delivery problems. Includes chapter by Ian Sinclair, Peter Gorbach, Enid Levin and Jenny Williams: 'Community care and residential admissions: results from two empirical studies'.

Journal article

Caring, the French Way

Author:
BARTLETT Nigel
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 9.11.89, 1989, pp.2O-22.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Home care services for the elderly in France have been provided by non-profit-making organisations for 25 years. Service provision can vary between such organisations.

Journal article

Housing and ageing in France and Germany: the intergenerational solution

Authors:
LABIT Anne, DUBOST Nathalie
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 19(2), 2016, pp.45-54.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: In France and Germany, intergenerational housing is put forward as an option by public authorities. This kind of housing scheme seems like a good solution for seniors and young people, from both an economic and a social point of view. But beyond this common philosophy, there are differences in the way intergenerational housing is being implemented in the two countries. France mainly favours the student-senior home-sharing model whereas the intergenerational collaborative housing (co-housing) model based on solidarity between seniors and families is gaining ground in Germany. This paper explores the reasons for these differences and present results from field surveys conducted in both countries. Design/methodology/approach: The qualitative methodology of the field surveys consisted essentially of semi-structured interviews with the young people and seniors living in these types of housing, in order to understand how they experienced intergenerational solidarity. Findings: The authors’ surveys revealed that certain conditions are essential for this intergenerational solidarity to be fully effective, notably voluntary participation and commitment to the project, and possibly external support to ensure that it is designed and implemented in the best possible way. Originality/value: This paper provides useful recommendations for decision makers who wish to support this type of housing concept based on intergenerational solidarity. (Publisher abstract)

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