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Journal article

Family caregivers of the elderly: quality of life and coping in Estonia

Authors:
TAMMSAAR Krista, et al
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 17(4), 2014, pp.539-555.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This study analyses the assessments of elderly people aged 65 and family caregiving as a factor influencing their quality of life and coping. The study is based on the project SUFACARE, ‘Supporting family carers and care receivers in Estonia and in Finland', in the framework of which the Institute of Social Work of Tallinn University carried out postal surveys in 2010. The Estonian survey was conducted in Tallinn and Lääne-Viru County. The total number of respondents was 581 (70% female and 30% male), of whom 98 (n=74 female and n=24 male) were family caregivers. Caregiving has not influenced the physical and mental health of caregivers, the reason being that many people who receive care are not of very ill health or suffer from dementia. People mostly take care of their spouses. Based on the Estonian Family Law Act, adult descendants are required to provide maintenance if their relatives are not able to care for themselves. Caregivers whose health is below average consider caring to be physically demanding. Women report caregiving to be physically strenuous more often than men. The mental health of male caregivers is better and fewer male respondents claimed to feel unhappy or depressed compared to female respondents. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Long-term care quality assurance policies in European countries

Authors:
DANDI Roberto, et al
Publisher:
European Network of Economic Policy Research Institutes
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
89p.
Place of publication:
Brussels

This report present the findings and conclusions of research undertaken in the context of research projects carried out by a consortium of ENEPRI member institutes. This report is a contribution to Work Package 5 of the ANCIEN project, which focuses on the future of long-term care for the elderly in Europe. This report analyses the quality assurance policies for long-term care (LTC) in the following countries: Austria, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. First, it discusses quality assurance in LTC by analysing: the dimensions of quality, the policy frameworks for quality in LTC, the different levels of development of LTC quality policies at the international, national, organisational, and individual levels. Second, it describes the methodology for collecting and analysing data on quality policies in the selected countries. Finally, it discusses the results, identifying four clusters of countries based on quality policies and indicators for LTC. These clusters are compared to the clusters identified in Work Package 1 of the ANCIEN project. Policy recommendations are proposed.

Book Full text available online for free

Quality assurance indicators of long-term care in European countries

Authors:
DANDI Roberto, CASANOVA Georgia
Publisher:
European Network of Economic Policy Research Institutes
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
128p.
Place of publication:
Brussels

This report present the findings and conclusions of research undertaken in the context of research projects carried out by a consortium of ENEPRI member institutes. This report is a contribution to Work Package 5 of the ANCIEN project, which focuses on the future of long-term care for the elderly in Europe. The report presents the quality indicators that were collected by the ANCIEN project partners in each country. The main contribution of this report is a classification of the quality assurance indicators in different European countries according to three dimensions: organisation type; quality dimensions; and system dimensions. The countries that provided quality indicators, which are used at a national level or are recommended to be used at a local level by a national authority, are: Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom. In total, 390 quality indicators were collected. Each quality indicator has been assigned to one or more options in each dimension.

Journal article

Associations between quality of relationships and life satisfaction of older mothers in Estonia, Germany, Russia and China

Authors:
WU Jing, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 36(6), 2016, pp.1272-1294.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

The aim of the current study is to examine the associations between the quality of relationships and life satisfaction of older mothers in Estonia, Germany, Russia and the People's Republic of China, based on the assumptions of the Family Change Theory. The role of satisfaction with family life as the probable mediating factor is considered. Estonian older mothers reported the least admiration and intimacy in their relationships with their adult daughters, and the least satisfaction with family life compared to German, Russian and Chinese mothers. German older mothers perceived the most admiration from their adult daughters and were the most satisfied with both their family and general life. Russian older mothers were the least satisfied with their general life compared to their counterparts in Estonia, Germany and China. The results from the Structural Equation Modelling showed that the relationship between satisfaction with family life and general life satisfaction was statistically significant in all countries except Russia. The satisfaction with family life as a mediating factor might strengthen the positive and negative aspects of intergenerational relationships on the life satisfaction of older mothers. The findings indicated that the emotional closeness and intergenerational relationships in families during the process of transition and globalisation play an important role in the life satisfaction of older mothers in these four countries. (Publisher abstract)

Book

Care-related quality of life in old age: concepts, models and empirical findings

Editors:
VAARAMA Marja, PIEPER Richard, SIXSMITH Andrew, (eds.)
Publisher:
Springer
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
96p.
Place of publication:
Heidelberg

While best-practice data exist for long-term care, quality of life as a concept, measure and standard for care outcomes remains elusive. This book, which includes new instruments for evaluating care, brings together the findings of a European research initiative, the Care Keys Project. This addressed quality of life issues among frail, care-dependent older people, taking their social as well as health needs into account. It covered Finland, Estonia, Germany, Sweden and the United Kingdom. The writers explain the theory behind Care Keys, its methodology, empirical findings, and practical considerations in promoting effective, efficient elder care aimed at social and emotional well-being and including disabled and cognitively impaired patients. The book brings together gerontological knowledge from medical, psychology, nursing, sociology, economics, and health care systems perspectives. It introduces an integrated theory of care-related quality of life that emphasises social, emotional and mental aspects as well as physical longevity. The editors present a practice oriented framework for quality management of long-term care toward improving elders’ quality of life. They examine quality of life in home and long-term care settings across the five European member countries of Care Keys and describe the Care Keys Toolkit, featuring innovative measures for monitoring and evaluating care and troubleshooting for problem areas.

Book

Governing home care: a cross-national comparison

Authors:
BURAU Viola, THEOBALD Hildegard, BLANK Robert H.
Publisher:
Edward Elgar
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
224p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Cheltenham

This book offers a comprehensive analysis of the principle issues surrounding the governance of home care. In this context home care is taken to mean any care and support offered to older people in their homes. The analysis maps out governing arrangements in relation to formal and informal care services, informal care, care workers and users of care across nine countries: Estonia; New Zealand; Italy; the United Kingdom; Sweden; Japan; Germany; the Netherlands; the United States. The authors explore the ways in which country specific contexts shape governing arrangements and bring together insights form social care and public policy literature.

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