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Journal article

Clock drawing test in screening for Alzheimer's dementia and mild cognitive impairment in clinical practice

Authors:
VYHNALEK Martin, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 32(9), 2017, pp.933-939.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Objectives: The clock drawing test (CDT) is a commonly used brief cognitive measure. The authors evaluated diagnostic accuracy of subjective ratings of CDT by physicians (with/without specialty in cognitive neurology) and neuropsychologists in discriminating amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), Alzheimer's dementia (AD) and cognitively healthy older adults. They further compared the diagnostic accuracy of subjective categorical ratings with complex scoring of CDT. Methods: Three cognitive neurologists, three neuropsychologists and six neurology residents without experience in cognitive neurology blinded to the diagnosis rated 187 CDTs (50 mild AD, 49 aMCI and 88 cognitively healthy older adults) using a “yes” (abnormal) versus “suspected” versus “no” (normal) classification. The rating suspected was combined with yes or no to obtain two sets of sensitivity estimates. The authors also used a 17-point CDT rating system. Results: When using the categorical rating, neuropsychologists had highest sensitivity (89%) in differentiating patients with mild AD (yes/suspected versus no), followed by neurologic residents (80%) and cognitive neurologists (79%). When differentiating patients with aMCI (yes/suspected versus no), the sensitivity was 84% for neuropsychologists, 64% for cognitive neurologists and 62% for residents. The sensitivity using the complex scoring system was 92% in patients with mild AD and 69% in patients with aMCI. Conclusions: A categorical rating of CDT shows high sensitivity for mild AD even in non-experienced raters. Neuropsychologists outperformed physicians in differentiating patients with aMCI from cognitively healthy older adults (specificity), which was counterbalanced by the lower specificity of their ratings. The diagnostic accuracy was not substantially improved by using complex scoring system. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Social dancing and older adults: playground for physical activity

Authors:
ROBERSON Donald N., PELCLOVA Jana
Journal article citation:
Ageing International, 39(2), 2014, pp.124-143.
Publisher:
Springer
Place of publication:
New York

This research focuses on social dancing and its relationship to well-being in the later stage of life. While dancing as a form of physical exercise for seniors has been studied, social dancing has not been as thoroughly investigated. This popular cultural and social activity can contribute to the life of older adults in a variety of ways. The purpose of this study is to identify the ways in which social dancing contributes to the well-being of seniors. To this end we observed, surveyed, and formed a focus group from two dance locations in Olomouc, Czech Republic. As a result of participant observation, questionnaires, and a focus group there were three main findings. 1). Social dance can be a health enhancing physical activity. 2). As opposed to a dance class, social dance promotes a playful and spontaneous atmosphere. 3). This weekly scheduled event of dancing adds a positive reconnection and continuation with one’s memory, youth, and history. Communities should be encouraged to establish social dance as an option for all ages, especially older adults. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

‘Women are just more active’: gender as a determining factor in involvement in senior centres

Author:
MARHANKOVA Jaroslava Hasmanova
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 34(9), 2014, pp.1482-1504.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

A three-year ethnographic study was conducted at two centres in the Czech Republic which offer seniors-only leisure-time activities strongly grounded in the idea of active ageing. The method of participant observation was used, and 47 in-depth interviews were conducted with the centres' clients and employees. The higher participation by women in the centres and the role they attribute to such organisations in their lives is analysed in the context of their previous gendered biographies. Gender patterns embedded in the way daily activities at the senior centres are organised, as well as in the idea of active ageing itself, are highlighted. Despite the seeming invisibility of gender as a principle that structures the way these centres are run, they are in fact gendered organisations, where gender emerges as a basic principle affecting the chances of participating in active ageing as presented by the centres. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Potential of mobile technologies and applications in the detection of mild cognitive impairment among older generation groups

Authors:
KLIMOVA Blanka, VALIS Martin, KUCA Kamil
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Health Care, 56(7), 2017, pp.588-599.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

At present, demographic changes result in the growing number of older people. This trend inevitably brings about serious social and economic issues, as well as occurrence of ageing diseases. The purpose of this study is to discuss the potential of using mobile technologies and applications in the detection of ageing disorders such as mild cognitive impairment. The methods used for this review study include a literature search in the world’s acknowledged databases. The findings of this study indicate that mobile applications can serve as appropriate diagnostic tools for ageing disorders such as mild cognitive impairment because they seem to provide better, faster, and less costly care for older people. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Facing the challenges in the development of long-term care for older people in Europe in the context of an economic crisis

Authors:
DEUSDAD Blanca A., PACE Charles, ANTTONEN Anneli
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Service Research, 42(2), 2016, pp.144-150.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This article introduces the content of this special issue, which incorporates eight articles in which authors evaluate recent changes and developments in long term conditions (LTCs) for older people in European countries, most particularly from the perspective of restructuring taking place in the LTC for older people. The economic and state financial crises are the most important drivers behind widespread overall restructuring processes. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Analysing equity in the use of long-term care in Europe

Authors:
RODRIGUES Ricardo, ILINCA Stefania, SCHMIDT Andrea
Publisher:
European Commission
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
39
Place of publication:
Brussels

There are significant differences across social protection systems in Europe in the scope, breadth and depth of coverage of the risk to need long-term care in old-age. Together with other factors, such as education, household structure or societal values regarding care for frail older people, these differences can have a significant impact on the use of long-term care. Using SHARE data, this Research Note compares differences between European countries in the use of long-term care across income groups, for older people living at home. It analyses not only inequalities in the use of long-term care, but also differences in use that persist after differences in need have been taken into consideration, i.e. horizontal inequity. For this purpose, concentration indices, concentration curves and horizontal inequity indices are estimated for home care services and informal care. The countries analysed here are Austria, Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, Spain, Italy, France, Denmark, Greece, Belgium and Czech Republic. The findings suggest that differences in use of home care services across income groups mostly reflect differences in need between those same groups. For informal care, the differences in use persist even after accounting for needs, and less affluent individuals are much more likely to use informal care. Some possible causes for these differences and policy implications are considered.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Positions of social workers’ views about residential care for people with dementia

Authors:
HAVRDOVA Zuzana, JIRI Safr, STEGMANNOVA Ingrid
Journal article citation:
Social Work and Society: International Online Journal, 10(2), 2012, Online only
Publisher:
University of Bielefeld

Reform of the social services in the Czech Republic faces numerous obstacles in individual care, mainly in residential services. Many different professions participate in these services provided to care recipients. To show how social work may contribute to reforms in this area, the authors present the views of social workers about the care provided within a team of different professionals. A questionnaire survey was used to study the respondents’ readiness to apply the person-centred approach in a group of 560 professionals working in a number of residential facilities for the elderly. The results show that regardless of the organisational context, social workers tend towards the client-centred approach more often than other professionals. The organisational context influences however the perspectives of other professionals. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Functional status and depressive symptoms among older adults from residential care facilities in the Czech Republic

Authors:
VANKOVA Hana, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 23(5), May 2008, pp.466-471.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Depressive symptoms are common among older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities. However, little is known about factors associated with depressive symptoms among long-term care residents in the Czech Republic and in other Eastern European countries. Moreover, the role of mobility and pain in depressive symptoms among long-term care residents is relatively understudied. This study examined the relationship between functional status and depressive symptoms in 308 older adults from residential care facilities (RCFs) in the Czech Republic. Baseline data was used from two randomized controlled trials testing the effects of dance and reminiscence therapies on quality of life in older RCF residents. Functional status was measured as cognitive function, general ability to perform basic Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), mobility, and functional limitation by pain. Depressive symptoms were measured using the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale. In multiple regression analyses adjusted for sociodemographic factors and taking antidepressants, results found that cognitive function and functional limitation by pain were most strongly associated with depressive symptoms. The ability to perform basic ADLs and mobility were also related to depressive symptoms.

Book

Home care for the elderly

Author:
INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL SECURITY ASSOCIATION
Publisher:
International Social Security Association
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
140p.
Place of publication:
Geneva

Report describing the experience in 8 European countries with regard to assistance, health care and home care for older and disabled people, focusing in particular on the debate over the introduction of a dependency benefit.

Journal article

The potential of domiciliary care service in the Czech Republic to promote ageing in place

Authors:
KUBALCIKOVA Katerina, HAVLIKOVA Jana
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 18(1), 2015, pp.65-80.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Due to population ageing, the need for long-term care is increasing. In many European countries, there is now a firm policy preference for care in the home as opposed to institutional care and policies at the local level support this preference. The purpose of this study is to report on the position of domiciliary care service within the Czech social services for the elderly and to explore its potential to promote ‘ageing in place’. The aim of the research was to perceive this issue from the viewpoint of the different parties: service users, service workers, service managers as well as policy-makers. Therefore, the qualitative methodology (case study method) was used. The results revealed that users considered domiciliary care as the only service in the Czech Republic that allowed them to remain at home despite their worsening capacity to manage the activities of daily living. On the part of the domiciliary care service, however, the authors found that this was strong in the provision of practical help, as well as assistance with users' self-maintenance, whereas their supervision and care management were not explicitly included either in the concept or the practice of this type of service. (Edited publisher abstract)

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