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Journal article

Quality of nursing home care in Cyprus: are elder residents content with their treatment?

Author:
GEORGIADES Savvas
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 50(3/4), 2008, pp.3-24.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Residents (n=73) were interviewed in four different types of nursing home (governmental, community-run, faith-based and private) to ascertain their views on the quality of care they received. The results show that the majority are happy with the quality of primary care in terms of medical treatment, nutrition, cleanliness and staff professionalism. However, they also feel lonely and deprived of essential entertainment opportunities. The implications for both domestic and global service design, and for research, are discussed. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Caring and coping: the dementia caregivers

Authors:
PAPASTAVROU Evridiki, et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 15(6), August 2011, pp.702-711.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Noting that caring for a family member with Alzheimer's disease is associated with increased burden and depression, this study aimed to examine the association between caregiver burden, coping strategies and psychiatric well-being in family caregivers of patients with dementia. The participants were 172 carers of patients suffering from Alzheimer's type dementia, recruited from neurology clinics in Cyprus. The Greek versions of 4 measures were used to gather information through interviews: the Memory and Behaviour Problem Checklist, the Caregiver Burden Scale, the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale, and the Ways of Coping Questionnaire. The article describes the analysis and results. It explains that positive coping was negatively associated with burden, that this means that caregivers who are more confident in their ability to find solutions are more likely to handle the stressful symptoms of dementia effectively and reduce negative effects associated with caring, and that coping effectiveness was negatively associated with depression.

Journal article

Happiness in and out of nursing homes: the case of Cyprus

Authors:
NEOCLEOUS Gregory, APOSTOLOU Menelaos
Journal article citation:
International Social Work, 59(4), 2016, pp.533-544.
Publisher:
Sage

This study measures the level of happiness among elderly Cypriots living in their own home environments and in nursing homes. The authors found that the elderly living in their own home are significantly happier than the elderly living in nursing homes. On the basis of these findings, they propose that the role of social workers could be valuable regarding happiness of older Cypriots. Within the frame of the current results, the authors have identified a lack of alternative housing options in Cyprus that would combine home environment with adequate health and social care for older people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

A good place to grow older: synthesis report: Peer Review in Social Protection and Social Inclusion 2010, London, 18-19 January 2011

Authors:
HOKEMA Anna, TESCH-ROMER Clemens
Publisher:
Peer Review in Social Protection and Social Inclusion
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
40p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Vienna

Peer Reviews are a key instrument of the EU framework ‘the open method of coordination’. They aim to enable open discussion on social protection and social inclusion policies in the different EU Member States and facilitate the mutual learning process among them. This publication reports on a Peer Review held in London in January 2011 which focused on strategies for building ‘a good place to grow older’. The Peer Review was hosted by the UK Department for Work and Pensions and also involved representatives from Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, Hungary, Romania and Spain. This publication covers: the policy debate at European level; the main elements of the UK’s policy; the experiences in peer countries and stakeholder contributions; and discussions at the Peer Review meeting covering UK policy reforms (including pension reform and reforms to health and social care), the role of ‘Big Society’, and the principles behind the reforms. The main conclusions and key lessons to emerge from the Peer Review relate to: the transferability of the UK reforms; older people as a societal resource; old age as part of life’s course; diversity; active ageing and the extension of working life; volunteering; partnerships across sectors; the role of stakeholder organisations; access to information; the role of the environment; and strategies for scaling up pilot projects.

Book Full text available online for free

An international comparison of health, social care and welfare legislation and its effects on older British nationals' mobility within the European Union: final report

Authors:
COLDRON Keleigh, O'BRIEN Charlotte
Publisher:
Age Concern England; Royal British Legion
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
56p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The purpose of this study was to examine the rights to statutory health, social care and welfare provision that are lost on migrating from the UK. In order to do this the health, welfare and social care benefits and services available for older British nationals within the United Kingdom, Portugal, France, Germany and Cyprus are defined and compared. The report also investigated whether retirement migrants are specifically disadvantaged or other migrants are equally disadvantaged. Section 2 outlines the 'losses' retirement migrants would face should they move to another state. Section 3 revealed gaps in the statutory services available to older British nationals should they move to one of the member states in the study. One of the conclusions in the report is that if individuals are heavily dependent on social care services to live their lives in the UK, it may not be a wise move to move to another Member State.

Journal article

Expectations of inter-generational reciprocity among older Greek Cypriot migrants in London

Author:
CYLWIK Helen
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 22(5), September 2002, pp.599-613.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

This article explores the expectations of inter-generational reciprocity amongst older Greek Cypriot women and men living in London from the parents' perspective. Participants engaged in a number of discourses when talking about children. These discourses, which were culturally determined, underpinned parental expectations of inter-generational reciprocity. On a day-to-day basis, older Greek Cypriots were both givers and receivers of help. Gender differences, rather than differences in age or marital status, were evident in both the giving and receiving of help. Parents' perceptions of parent-child relations were not affected by migration, and were pivotal to wellbeing in later life. The bonds between parents and children were perceived as being strong and enduring, although changing throughout the lifecourse.

Book

Growing old differently

Editors:
BOGARD Gerald, TYLER William
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1994
Pagination:
278p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Europe wide collection of papers looking at what part education has to play in combating isolation and exclusion from mainstream life of the growing population of older people. Suggests new approaches to education for older people and ageing polices that focus on this issue and on the construction of an active and responsible citizenship for all.

Book

Caring for older Europeans: comparative studies in 29 countries

Author:
GIARCHI George Giacinto
Publisher:
Arena
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
547p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

Provides a reference source for various modes of care (both formal and informal) for older people throughout Europe. Each chapter follows the same format and covers: demography; socio-political and administrative background; social security and pensions; housing; health care; mental health care; residential care; personal social services; voluntary care agencies and support organisations; leisure pursuits and education; and older people in rural areas.

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