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Journal article

Knowledge of urinary incontinence among Chinese community nurses and community-dwelling older people

Authors:
YUAN Haobin, WILLIAMS Beverly A.
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 18(1), January 2010, pp.82-90.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The purpose of this study was to describe knowledge of urinary incontinence among community nurses and community-dwelling older people in China. A random sampling method was used to recruit 100 Chinese people aged 60 or older and 100 nurses serving as community nursing staff in the Jinshan and Manhui health service centres. All participants completed a demographic survey and the Urinary Incontinence Knowledge Scale. The results demonstrated that older people had a very poor knowledge of urinary incontinence particularly relating to risk factors, prevention, treatment and management. Although community nurses had moderate knowledge of the impact of incontinence, they still lacked knowledge of risk factors, symptoms, prevention, treatment, and management. Because of their knowledge deficits, community nurses and older people viewed urinary incontinence as a normal part of the ageing process. The findings suggest that both nurses and older people have educational needs relating to incontinence, and that the development of specific educational programmes concerning urinary incontinence should be the focus of further studies.

Book Full text available online for free

Ageing and well-being in an international context

Author:
CLIFTON Jonathan
Publisher:
Institute for Public Policy Research
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
36p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The author asks what lessons the UK can learn from several case studies from overseas about how the well-being of older people can be incorporated into a wider range of policy areas than those, traditionally, of pensions, health and social care. For example, in the UK an ageing population brings more focus onto mental health, loneliness and isolation issues, whereas life satisfaction is highest in Japan among those over 65. In addition, case studies from Ireland, the United States, Norway, Finland, New Zealand and China are presented with much variation in findings. Examples of how the well-being of older people can be addressed in the four key areas of relationships, work, learning and the built environment are discussed and put forward by the author as good practice for the future of an ageing population in the UK.

Journal article

Elder abuse and neglect in an urban Chinese population

Authors:
DONG Xin Qi, SIMON Melissa A., GORBIEN Martin
Journal article citation:
Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, 19(3/4), 2007, pp.79-96.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

A cross-sectional study performed in an urban medical centre in Nanjing is reported, and shows that elder abuse and neglect is common in mainland China. A total of 412 participants completed the survey, of whom 35% (mean age 69, 59% male) screened positive for elder abuse and neglect. Caregiver neglect was the most common form of abuse, followed by financial exploitation, psychological abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse and abandonment. Thirty-six percent suffered multiple forms of abuse and neglect. Risk factors associated with abuse and neglect were female gender, lower educational level and lower income. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Does a universal non-contributory pension scheme make sense for rural China?

Authors:
SHEN Ce, WILLIAMSON John B.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare, 22(2), October 2006, pp.143-153.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Rapid economic growth in China during the past 25 years has been accompanied by increasing economic inequality. China's old-age social security system has long been restricted to urban areas, leaving the 70 per cent of the population living in rural areas with little or no coverage. The lack of social security for elderly people in rural areas poses a threat to social stability and raises social justice concerns. This study is based in part on interviews conducted in rural northeastern China. It also draws on evidence from Chinese government documents, newspapers, and reports on relevant programs in other developing countries. For rural China the authors propose a variant of the universal non-contributory old-age pension model that takes into consideration rural-urban differences in cost of living. The proposed model would reduce the level of poverty in rural areas as well as the degree of income inequality between rural and urban areas while simultaneously promoting social and political stability.

Journal article

Non-state care homes for older people as third sector organisations in China's transitional welfare economy

Authors:
WONG Linda, JUN Tang
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Policy, 35(2), April 2006, pp.229-246.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Place of publication:
Cambridge

The rise of the third sector has been a global welfare phenomenon. In China, the growth of social organisations has been a remarkable feature of the transitional society after the adoption of market reforms and political liberalisation. In its emergent welfare economy, the third sector has been hailed as a new growth point in social care as the state retreats from direct provision of welfare services. This article examines non-state care homes for older people in urban China based on a survey of 137 homes in three cities. It begins with a brief review of the theory of the third sector, non-governmental organisations and private markets in the production of welfare. This is followed by a discussion of third-sector organisations, markets and the state in the special context of China. The next section appraises the factors that contribute to the surge of non-state residential provision for the elderly. The final part of the article presents empirical findings on the development, key features and authority relations of 137 non-state care homes for older people. It is argued that their uniqueness marks them out as a special form of third-sector organisation in China's welfare economy.

Journal article

Dementia research in China

Authors:
CHIU Helen F.K., ZHANG Mingyuan
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 15(10), October 2000, pp.947-953.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

There is little information on dementia research in China in the international literature. This paper is an overview of studies on dementia conducted in China. Studies on dementia research in China were identified through a literature search, as well as through consulting Chinese psychiatrists and neurologists with expertise in the field. These studies were then reviewed. Finds that there is much research activity in China in the field of dementia and further cross-cultural studies are useful to examine the cultural differences in various areas of dementia research.

Journal article

Enforcing family care obligations for the elderly in China through mediation

Authors:
LEUNG Joe C.B., LAM Debbie O.B.
Journal article citation:
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work, 10(1), March 2000, pp.77-89.
Publisher:
Times Academic

Demographic and social changes are challenging the capacity and willingness of the Chinese traditional virtue of adult children providing financial and social support for their aged parents. Because of the underdevelopment of formal social services in China, the Chinese Government has to rely on legislation and neighbourhood-based mediation service to enforce family care obligations. Describes the operation of the service and assesses its effectiveness in practice.

Journal article

Attitudes of Chinese elderly people towards death: practical implications for social workers

Authors:
MING-LIN Alice Chong, LANG Graeme S.
Journal article citation:
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work, 8(1), March 1998, pp.50-63.
Publisher:
Times Academic

This article documents the attitudes of Chinese elderly people with different religious beliefs towards death and dying. Discusses the implications for social work with this population.

Journal article

Visibly older

Author:
WEBB Sheila
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 16.1.92, 1992, p.21.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

China has long followed the Confucian concept of filial duty and of veneration of elders, but with the demographic and cultural changes now taking place the elderly may soon face a third age which brings poverty and loneliness.

Book

Family care of the elderly: social and cultural changes

Editor:
KOSBERG Jordan I.
Publisher:
Sage
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
329p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Newbury Park, CA

Takes a global look at care for older people within the family circle, and compares and contrasts global changes in the last decade.

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