Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 26

Journal article

Trends in suicide rates of the elderly in Austria, 1970-2004: an analysis of changes in terms of age groups, suicide methods and gender

Authors:
KAPUSTA Netsor D., ETZERSDORFER Elmar, SONNECK Germot
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 22(5), May 2007, pp.438-444.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Suicides of the elderly (persons aged 65 and older) make up a large proportion of total suicides. Since suicide rates of the elderly are highest in western populations, addressing them as a risk group in prevention plans has been recommended. In order to assess possible approaches to prevention strategies, this study examines high-risk groups of the elderly. The authors examined official statistics on suicides that occurred in Austria between 1970-2004 (18,101 Suicides of the elderly). The authors  analyzed time trends and differences in suicide methods as well as in age groups and both genders of the elderly. Three major high-risk groups were identified: elderly male suicides by firearms; elderly female suicides by poisoning, which occur more often with increasing age; and suicides of both genders by jumping from heights. Besides conducting treatment of psychiatric disorders of the elderly, restricting the means to commit suicide may help to prevent it among the elderly. Such specific prevention strategies should be implemented in national suicide prevention plans for the high-risk groups identified in this study.

Book

Family care of the elderly: social and cultural changes

Editor:
KOSBERG Jordan I.
Publisher:
Sage
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
329p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Newbury Park, CA

Takes a global look at care for older people within the family circle, and compares and contrasts global changes in the last decade.

Book Full text available online for free

Long-term care quality assurance policies in European countries

Authors:
DANDI Roberto, et al
Publisher:
European Network of Economic Policy Research Institutes
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
89p.
Place of publication:
Brussels

This report present the findings and conclusions of research undertaken in the context of research projects carried out by a consortium of ENEPRI member institutes. This report is a contribution to Work Package 5 of the ANCIEN project, which focuses on the future of long-term care for the elderly in Europe. This report analyses the quality assurance policies for long-term care (LTC) in the following countries: Austria, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. First, it discusses quality assurance in LTC by analysing: the dimensions of quality, the policy frameworks for quality in LTC, the different levels of development of LTC quality policies at the international, national, organisational, and individual levels. Second, it describes the methodology for collecting and analysing data on quality policies in the selected countries. Finally, it discusses the results, identifying four clusters of countries based on quality policies and indicators for LTC. These clusters are compared to the clusters identified in Work Package 1 of the ANCIEN project. Policy recommendations are proposed.

Book

Growing older in the community: European projects in housing and planning

Authors:
BRECH Joachim, POTTER Philip
Publisher:
Anchor Housing Trust/Wohnbund
Publication year:
1994
Pagination:
197p.,tables,illus.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Research report looking at how meeting the care and housing needs of older people, to enable them to live in the community for as long as possible, is being tackled by European countries.

Book Full text available online for free

Analysing equity in the use of long-term care in Europe

Authors:
RODRIGUES Ricardo, ILINCA Stefania, SCHMIDT Andrea
Publisher:
European Commission
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
39
Place of publication:
Brussels

There are significant differences across social protection systems in Europe in the scope, breadth and depth of coverage of the risk to need long-term care in old-age. Together with other factors, such as education, household structure or societal values regarding care for frail older people, these differences can have a significant impact on the use of long-term care. Using SHARE data, this Research Note compares differences between European countries in the use of long-term care across income groups, for older people living at home. It analyses not only inequalities in the use of long-term care, but also differences in use that persist after differences in need have been taken into consideration, i.e. horizontal inequity. For this purpose, concentration indices, concentration curves and horizontal inequity indices are estimated for home care services and informal care. The countries analysed here are Austria, Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, Spain, Italy, France, Denmark, Greece, Belgium and Czech Republic. The findings suggest that differences in use of home care services across income groups mostly reflect differences in need between those same groups. For informal care, the differences in use persist even after accounting for needs, and less affluent individuals are much more likely to use informal care. Some possible causes for these differences and policy implications are considered.

Book

Regulating long-term care quality: an international comparison

Editors:
MOR Vincent, LEONE Tiziana, MARESSO Anna
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
519
Place of publication:
Cambridge

This edited book provides a comprehensive international survey of long-term care provision and regulation, built around a series of case studies from Europe, North America and Asia. The analytical framework allows the different approaches that countries have adopted to be compared side by side and readers are encouraged to consider which quality assurance approaches might best meet their own country's needs. Wider issues underpinning the need to regulate the quality of long-term care are also discussed. The book is aimed at policymakers working in the health care sector, researchers and students taking graduate courses on health policy and management. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Livindhome: living independently at home: reforms in home care in 9 European countries

Authors:
ROSTGAARD Tina, et al
Publisher:
Danish National Centre for Social Research
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
252p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Copenhagen

This report presents findings from the project Living Independently at Home: Reforms in organisation and governance of European home care for older people and people with disabilities (LIVINDHOME). The study provides an overview of recent and current reforms in the organisation and governance of home care systems in nine European countries, and analyses the intended and unintended results of these reforms, in particular, how the reforms have affected the organisation, supply and quality of care. The focus of the study is home care for older people and for people with disabilities. In countries that have more family-oriented welfare traditions (Austria, Germany, Italy, Ireland), comprehensive approaches to long-term care have started to develop only relatively recently. Despite increases in funding for long-term care, home care provision in Italy and Ireland remains highly fragmented, with major local variations in access to services. The second group of countries (Denmark, England, Finland, Norway, and Sweden) have had more or less comprehensive home care services in place for many years. These have been delivered by local authorities under a legislative framework set by central government. Reforms have here involved the introduction of market- and consumer-related mechanisms into the supply and delivery of home care.

Book Full text available online for free

Active ageing and prevention in the context of long-term care: rethinking concepts and practices

Author:
RUPPE Georg
Publisher:
European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
16p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Vienna

Relating prevention with long-term care is often thought of as something contradictory. In many countries “long-term care” and “prevention” are terms strongly associated with the ideologies of “being taken care of” and “avoidance” and are thus also often related to passivity. It generally provokes the question whether preventive or activating measures are still feasible or even existent for a person already in need of long-term care. Occasionally it is even considered sarcastic to speak of prevention or rehabilitation when long-term care has already entered the stage. The introduction to this Policy Brief explores conceptual meanings of prevention and long-term care in relation to active ageing. Some general European trends and national developments in Austria concerning long-term care as well as related measures of prevention and activation for older people are outlined in the first part of the Policy Brief. The following section critically discusses general social and health policy approaches as well as practice examples in different long-term care settings in Austria. The Policy Brief concludes with a number of recommendations for prevention and active ageing policies targeted specifically for those older people with existing long-term care needs.

Journal article

A comparative analysis of personalisation: balancing an ethic of care with user empowerment

Author:
RUMMERY Kirstein
Journal article citation:
Ethics and Social Welfare, 5(2), June 2011, pp.138-152.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Abingdon

Modern developments in care and support delivery for disabled and older people have led to the expansion of personalisation schemes, where money is paid in substitute for care and support. Although the schemes have been evaluated within their own national contexts, little work has been done so far to explore the theoretical implications of their development and extension, particularly from an ethics of care perspective. This paper fills that gap by drawing on comparative evidence from several schemes across different nations to develop an analysis which draws on feminist theory and an ethics of care approach to examine: the gendered policy outcomes and impact of such schemes; a feminist analysis of the governance implications of personalisation; the implications for the gendered division of work, particularly between paid and unpaid care work and between different groups of paid and unpaid carers; an ethics of care analysis of the impact of personalisation over the lifecourse of disabled and older people, and carers; and a discussion of the relationship between commodification, empowerment, citizenship and choice drawing on the work of care ethicists.

Journal article

Ageing and health status in adults with intellectual disabilities: results of the European Pomona II study

Authors:
HAVEMAN Meindert, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Intellectual and Developmental Disability, 36(1), March 2011, pp.49-60.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare

POMONA II was a European Commission funded public health project collecting information from 14 countries using a set of key health indicators specifically relevant for people with intellectual disabilities. This research focused on age-specific differences relating to environmental and lifestyle factors and the 17 medical conditions measured by the POMONA Checklist of Health Indicators. The article describes how information was collected using the POMONA Health Interview Survey and Evaluation Form from a sample of 1,253 participants in Austria, Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, and the United Kingdom. It then presents the results of the analysis, with tables showing characteristics of people with intellectual disabilities in the study, frequency of social contacts with relatives or friends according to age, lifestyle risk factors in people with intellectual disabilities according to age, and general and age-specific prevalence rates of health problems. The authors discuss how healthy older adults with intellectual disabilities are with regard to lifestyle factors, and whether there are health disparities between older adults with and without intellectual disabilities. They note that some evidence of health disparities was found for older people with intellectual disabilities, particularly in terms of under diagnosed or inadequately managed preventable health conditions.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts