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Journal article Full text available online for free

The cafe plus concept: a different model for different times

Authors:
WINDHORST Carla, et al
Journal article citation:
Generations, 34(1), Spring 2010, pp.91-93. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

Mather’s Cafe Plus was first developed in 2000 by Mather LifeWays (MLW), an Evanston, Illinois-based not-for-profit organization. Café Plus locations were selected in urban communities with significant older adult populations. The early model was designed to attract older adults who would benefit from centralized access to programs and services addressing social engagement and well-being, in addition to meeting basic needs. Development of the Cafe Plus model focused on a “participatory paradigm” establishing partnerships among community leaders, health providers, businesses, and (most importantly) community-residing older adults. An evaluation of the impact of the program is presented.

Book Full text available online for free

Not just tea and bingo: community provision for older people in Newham

Author:
MANN Kulbinder
Publisher:
Community Links
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
42p.
Place of publication:
London

This report begins with an introduction. Section 2 sets out facts and figures and identifies key national and local policies. Section 3 describes the range of services provided by voluntary and community organisations. Section 4 is about service users. Section 5 gives conclusions and recommendations.

Book Full text available online for free

Range and Capacity Review Group: second report: the future care of older people in Scotland

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive Range and Capacity Review Group
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
72p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This is the second and final report from the Scottish Executive Health Department’s Range and Capacity Review Group The National Delayed Discharge Action Plan (March 2002) highlighted the need to carry out a range and capacity review of community care services for older people, and led to the establishment of this Range and Capacity Review Group. The first report of the Group Projections of community care service users, workforce and costs was published on 16 July 2004. This was modelling work that presented 7 scenarios and then, for each of these scenarios, set out statistical projections of the numbers of community care service users and of workforce and cost implications at a Scotland level up to 2019. It did not set the context for care, nor did it make recommendations about the way forward. These matters are addressed in this report. This report does not provide, as some might have expected, a detailed analysis of the different models that were outlined in the Group’s first report. As the work progressed it quickly became apparent that the national review group could not decide what should happen at local level. Of the scenarios in the first report, scenario 7 (the joint future model) is the one that fits best with the direction of policy and practice in Scotland. But the way in which a joint future model is delivered in one area will be different from that in another area, because of the mix of existing services (and their inter-action, of which more is said later about a whole systems approach), and the local population and geography. This report therefore sets out: the group's understanding of the big problems, the context in the light of recent, major reports (notably Building a Health Service Fit for the Future (the Kerr Report), Delivering for Health, Better Outcomes for Older People, and the 21st Century Social Work Review), and a vision for care for the increasing ageing population in years to come. The report is therefore neither an action plan nor a model of care, but it sets out principles, a vision for care that has to be worked out in detail at local level.

Book Full text available online for free

AGEnda - information for older people

Authors:
AGE CONCERN SCOTLAND, SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive. Older People's Unit
Publisher:
The Scottish Executive Older People's Unit
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

A collection of articles for older people. In this winter edition the contents is "well and warm this winter"; "free central heating at the end of your phone"; "study proves huge volunteering benefits"; "mental health and well-being in later life"; "the pension service"; "getting extra reassurance and advice in Aberdeen", and "help delivered by Postwatch Scotland"

Book Full text available online for free

AGEnda: Information for Older People

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive
Publisher:
Scottish Executive Older People's Unit
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
12p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Scottish Executive's newsletter for older people. In this isssue: introducing Hugh Henry MSP, transport, free personal care, involving older people, healthy ageing, being active, older people and the arts, older learners, volunteering, adding life to years, new standards for care homes, looking for a dentist, and other news and information.

Book Full text available online for free

Fifty plus: information for older people

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive Health Department
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article Full text available online for free

Gerontological social work research in health and mental health

Author:
BERKMAN Barbara
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 21(1), January 2011, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

Five societal trends pose significant challenges to society and to social work practice: living with chronic illness, community-based practice, patient diversity, family caregiving, and palliative and end-of-life care. This paper looks at these trends, tying them to research priorities which a panel of social work researchers in the United States identified as most significant.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Transforming mental health care for older veterans in the Veterans Health Administration

Authors:
KARLIN Bradley E., ZEISS Antonette M.
Journal article citation:
Generations, 34(2), Summer 2010, pp.74-83. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

Older adults often lack familiarity with mental health symptoms and services and may hold negative beliefs about mental health care that can prevent them from seeking treatment. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) operates the largest and one of the most elaborate mental health care systems in the nation and perhaps the world. The recent history of the system is described. One successful new model for providing mental health care to older veterans that has been nationally implemented in the VHA is the integration of a full-time mental health provider on each of the more than 130 VA home-based primary care (HBPC) teams. Another major psychogeriatrics initiative involves the integration of a full-time mental health provider in VA community living centers (CLC), formerly designated as nursing home care units. It is critical that increasing national attention be devoted to the mental health needs of older Americans and that policies and processes be developed to extend the reach and potential impact of mental health care for older adults.

Journal article Full text available online for free

What’s all this about evidence-based practice? The roots, the controversies, and why it matters

Authors:
RAHMAN Annie, APPLEBAUM Robert
Journal article citation:
Generations, 34(1), Spring 2010, pp.6-10. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

The evolution of, advantages of and challenges to evidence-based practice are discussed. For the aging network, one of the biggest barriers to translating evidence-based research into practice stems from the important differences between the services the aging network provides and those delivered by the health sciences. In order for evidence-based practice to become a widely used approach, it must become a truly joint effort of both researchers and practitioners.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Optimising quality sleep among older people in the community and care homes: Some key findings from a four-year collaborative research project

Authors:
VENN Susan, et al
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 20(4), October 2010, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

The SomnIA (Sleep in Ageing) project aimed to undertake a range of studies relating to understanding poor sleep in later life. SomnIA is a four year NDA Collaborative Research Project which comprises eight workpackages aimed at (a) understanding poor sleep in later life in the community and in care homes, (b) devising interventions to help with poor sleep in the community and in care homes, and (c) dissemination through academic and practitioner conferences and workshops, briefing papers and journal articles, and through the creation of a module on ‘Sleep problems in Later Life’ for the Healthtalkonline website. Key findings are presented.

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