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Journal article Full text available online for free

The cafe plus concept: a different model for different times

Authors:
WINDHORST Carla, et al
Journal article citation:
Generations, 34(1), Spring 2010, pp.91-93. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

Mather’s Cafe Plus was first developed in 2000 by Mather LifeWays (MLW), an Evanston, Illinois-based not-for-profit organization. Café Plus locations were selected in urban communities with significant older adult populations. The early model was designed to attract older adults who would benefit from centralized access to programs and services addressing social engagement and well-being, in addition to meeting basic needs. Development of the Cafe Plus model focused on a “participatory paradigm” establishing partnerships among community leaders, health providers, businesses, and (most importantly) community-residing older adults. An evaluation of the impact of the program is presented.

Journal article

Time for caring? Elderly care employees' occupational activities in the cross draft between their work priorities, 'must-do's' and meaningfulness

Authors:
NILSSON Emma, NILSSON Kerstin
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Care Coordination, 20(1-2), 2017, pp.8-16.
Publisher:
Sage

An increasing number of older people in the population will bring new challenges for the society and care coordination. One of the most important questions in care coordination is the employees’ work performance. The overall aim of this study was to examine care employees’ experience of factors that rule how they allocate their time and tasks in the care work. The study was qualitative and consists of focus group interviews with 36 employees in elderly care in five Swedish municipalities. Much of the work that care employees perform is controlled by others in the municipality organised health care. The employees had a limited possibility to decide what should be given priority in their work. However, the employees who participated in the focus group interviews did not want to prioritise tasks and duties they felt were faulty or in direct conflict with their own convictions. When employees experienced that the assistance assessments were correct and helpful to the individual elderly patient this contributed to the employees’ priority and performance of the task. The formal and informal control systems caused the employees’ priority to be mainly quantitative and visible work tasks, rather than more qualitative tasks and care giving to the elderly. In the intention to organise good care coordination that fit each elderly patients’ need it is important that those who work closest to the patient to a greater extent are given the opportunity to make their voice heard in decisions of care planning and assistance assessments. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Preferences and expectations for delivering bad news among Korean older adults

Authors:
KO Eunjeong, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Service Research, 40(4), 2014, pp.402-414.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

To explore Korean older adults’ perspectives toward physicians’ disclosure of serious illness to patients, 70 Korean older adults residing in the community were interviewed in person using a semistructured interview guide. Major themes included conflicting desires among participants to: 1) inform the patient directly, 2) inform the patient indirectly, and 3) inform only the family. Subthemes under the first theme included: a) decision making about treatment, b) planning and preparation for the future, c) need for use of an ethical standard, d) consideration of patient coping responses, and e) disclosure of serious illness as a relational process. Disclosure of bad news is more than revealing or concealing information. Needs and preferences regarding to what extent and how information is delivered differ by culture. Thus, understanding preferred communication pathways for advanced care planning in specific cultural frameworks is important. Future studies using clear concepts and measures about serious illness disclosure can better prepare health care professionals in interacting with those from minority cultures. In addition, studies of those with poor health status from diverse cultural groups may further assist social workers to tailor interventions to accommodate cultural needs and expectations in end-of-life settings. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

What happens to the “hand that rocked the cradle”? a study of elderly abuse in India

Authors:
BHATTACHARYA Sonali, BHATTACHARYA Shubhaseesh
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adult Protection, 16(3), 2014, pp.166-179.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the possible causes of elderly abuse in India and its repercussions for the society, based on the real cases and reports. Design/methodology/approach: A multiple case study approach has been used for the study sourced from archival newspaper reports, crime reports, and narration. Findings: Greater vigilance and more effective legislation would be required to solve the problem related to elder abuse. Originality/value: There is not much study of causes, consequences, effectiveness of the legal system with respect to elderly abuse in India. In that way, it will be a unique contribution. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Gambling among older adults in Singapore. Some preliminary empirical findings

Author:
NG Vincent C.K.
Journal article citation:
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development, 21(1), June 2011, pp.18-30.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Gambling is a widely accepted social and recreation activity in Singapore, with surveys suggesting that around 58% of the population have gambled at least once in the last 12 months. The purpose of this study was to shed light on gambling among older adults in Singapore.  A sample of 74 adults aged 60 and above who were participants of a community-based elderly outreach programme was surveyed. The survey included questions relating to gambling participation and the perception of the respondents.  The findings indicated that 27% of the respondents had gambled in the past month and their favourite gambling game was the lottery 4D. Those who gambled were found to have more free time than those who did not (64 hours per week versus 38 hours per week). Almost all the respondents (97%) did not know where to go to get help for problem gambling.  The article concludes that public education campaigns on problem gambling should be re-designed to reach out to older adults.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Gerontological social work research in health and mental health

Author:
BERKMAN Barbara
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 21(1), January 2011, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

Five societal trends pose significant challenges to society and to social work practice: living with chronic illness, community-based practice, patient diversity, family caregiving, and palliative and end-of-life care. This paper looks at these trends, tying them to research priorities which a panel of social work researchers in the United States identified as most significant.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Transforming mental health care for older veterans in the Veterans Health Administration

Authors:
KARLIN Bradley E., ZEISS Antonette M.
Journal article citation:
Generations, 34(2), Summer 2010, pp.74-83. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

Older adults often lack familiarity with mental health symptoms and services and may hold negative beliefs about mental health care that can prevent them from seeking treatment. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) operates the largest and one of the most elaborate mental health care systems in the nation and perhaps the world. The recent history of the system is described. One successful new model for providing mental health care to older veterans that has been nationally implemented in the VHA is the integration of a full-time mental health provider on each of the more than 130 VA home-based primary care (HBPC) teams. Another major psychogeriatrics initiative involves the integration of a full-time mental health provider in VA community living centers (CLC), formerly designated as nursing home care units. It is critical that increasing national attention be devoted to the mental health needs of older Americans and that policies and processes be developed to extend the reach and potential impact of mental health care for older adults.

Journal article Full text available online for free

What’s all this about evidence-based practice? The roots, the controversies, and why it matters

Authors:
RAHMAN Annie, APPLEBAUM Robert
Journal article citation:
Generations, 34(1), Spring 2010, pp.6-10. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

The evolution of, advantages of and challenges to evidence-based practice are discussed. For the aging network, one of the biggest barriers to translating evidence-based research into practice stems from the important differences between the services the aging network provides and those delivered by the health sciences. In order for evidence-based practice to become a widely used approach, it must become a truly joint effort of both researchers and practitioners.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Optimising quality sleep among older people in the community and care homes: Some key findings from a four-year collaborative research project

Authors:
VENN Susan, et al
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 20(4), October 2010, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

The SomnIA (Sleep in Ageing) project aimed to undertake a range of studies relating to understanding poor sleep in later life. SomnIA is a four year NDA Collaborative Research Project which comprises eight workpackages aimed at (a) understanding poor sleep in later life in the community and in care homes, (b) devising interventions to help with poor sleep in the community and in care homes, and (c) dissemination through academic and practitioner conferences and workshops, briefing papers and journal articles, and through the creation of a module on ‘Sleep problems in Later Life’ for the Healthtalkonline website. Key findings are presented.

Journal article

Does age at onset have clinical significance in older adults with bipolar disorder?

Authors:
CHU David, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 25(12), December 2010, pp.1266-1271.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Using data from the Bipolar Disorder Center for Pennsylvanians Study, a randomised controlled study of people with bipolar disorder, this analysis looked at factors including demographics, psychopathology and treatment response to examine the effects of age at onset in bipolar disorder in older adults. The analysis covered 61 subjects aged 60 years and older, grouped by early (less than 40 years) or late (more than 40 years) age at onset. The groups were compared on psychiatric comorbidity, medical burden, and percentage of days well during study participation. The results showed that patients with early and late onset experienced similar percentages of days well, while those with early onset had a slightly higher percentage of days depressed than those with late onset. The researchers concluded that distinguishing older adults with bipolar disorder by early or late age at onset has limited clinical usefulness.

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