Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 483

Book Full text available online for free

Co-production and participation: older people with high support needs

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
42p.
Place of publication:
London

This report provides a summary of the research literature on the participation and co-production of older people with high support needs. It identifies the benefits and barriers to participation and also includes a small-scale survey of good practice. The report notes that 'older people with high support needs' are a diverse group, falling into two strands of disadvantage - age and disability. Factors that may contribute to high support needs are also identified as: gender; ethnicity; religion and belief; lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people; poverty; learning disability; dementia and mental health problems; sensory impairment and housing contexts. The report goes on to identify the benefits and barriers to participation and different ways of involving older people. A resources section sets out resources available to support co-production in social care, including assessment tools and examples of practice and service development undertaken in co-production. The conclusion offers recommendations for improving practice. The report will be of particular interest to commissioners of social and health care services; people working in housing provision; service users and others developing the co-production/participation agenda in care provision and service development.

Book Full text available online for free

My home life: quality of life in care homes: a review of the literature

Author:
NATIONAL CARE HOMES RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FORUM
Publisher:
Help the Aged
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
192p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

My Home Life is a new initiative aimed at improving the quality of life of those who are living, dying, visiting and working in care homes for older people. This review aims to find existing best practices in care homes and promote care homes as a positive option for older people. The project is working to help improve the quality of life in care home, through the development of a range of resources, events, practice development initiatives and other activities.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

SCIE research briefing 3: aiding communication with people with dementia

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2005
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
Rev. ed.

A web-based briefing providing a concise summary of the current knowledge base on aiding communication with people with dementia. Coverage includes ethical considerations, views of service users and carers, innovative practice examples and implications for practice. Also highlights additional contacts and resources. The briefing was commissioned by the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE). The latest edition of this Briefing was produced in April 2005 and the next updated is due in April 2006.

Journal article

Mentalization in dementia care: an autoethnographic account of a project worker’s experiences

Authors:
LUXMOORE Bethany, McEVOY Phil
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 21(3), 2017, pp.147-156.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Mentalization is a psychodynamic concept that can help us to understand our emotional responses to others. The purpose of this paper to illustrate how the concept of mentalization may be applied in dementia care. Design/methodology/approach: An autoethnographic account of the author’s experiences (first author), working as a project manager in which the author used the concept of mentalization to pay close attention to how the author’s emotional responses to people with dementia influenced thier communicative interactions. Findings: This paper outlines how the author processed the author’s own internal experiences in both mentalizing and non-mentalizing modes, as the author wrestled with feelings of conscious incompetence. In the non-mentalizing mode, the author was pre-occupied with the author’s own anxieties. The author struggled to relate to or make sense of the experiences of the individuals with advanced dementia that the author engaged with. Moving towards a mentalizing stance helped the author to attune to the embodied experiences of the people with dementia and recognise the reciprocal nature of our communicative interactions. Originality/value: This paper illustrates the role that mentalization may play in developing natural and authentic strategies to support communicative engagement in dementia care. These strategies may be of potential value to family carers. Family carers who can maintain a mentalizing stance may be more able to respond in empathic, person- centred ways to people who are living with dementia. On the other hand, non-mentalizing responses may be a root cause of mis-understanding and emotional disengagement. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Diversity in older age: older refugees and asylum seekers

Author:
CENTRE FOR POLICY ON AGEING
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
9
Place of publication:
London

This review summarises findings from selected literature and statistics on older refugees and asylum seekers. It is one of a series of rapid reviews commissioned by Age UK into the diversity that exists in the older population and the inequalities faced by specific groups of older people. It provides a demographic overview of the number of older refugees and asylum seekers in Europe and the UK and highlights some of their specific needs. Issues facing older refugees and asylum seekers include low income, language barriers, the risk of loneliness and a lack of social networks, and often a loss of social status. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Diversity in older age: Gypsies and Travellers

Author:
CENTRE FOR POLICY ON AGEING
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
7
Place of publication:
London

This review summarises findings from selected literature and statistics on older Gypsies and Travellers. It is one of a series of rapid reviews commissioned by Age UK into the diversity that exists in the older population and the inequalities faced by specific groups of older people. Areas covered include: demographics, health, housing, and family and community. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Diversity in older age: older lesbian, gay and bi-sexual people and older transgender people

Author:
CENTRE FOR POLICY ON AGEING
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
24
Place of publication:
London

This review summarises findings from selected literature and statistics on older lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender people. It is one of a series of rapid reviews commissioned by Age UK into the diversity that exists in the older population and the inequalities faced by specific groups of older people. Areas covered include: demographics, relationships and communities, financial wellbeing, physical and mental health, housing and neighbourhoods, care and support and end of life care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Towards a new conceptualization of depression in older adult cancer patients: a review of the literature

Authors:
SARACINO Rebecca M., ROSENFELD Barry, NELSON Christian J.
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 20(12), 2016, pp.1230-1242.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Objectives: This paper reviews the phenomenology of depression in older adults, and individuals diagnosed with cancer. Method: PsychInfo, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google Scholar databases were searched for English-language studies addressing the phenomenology, symptoms, or assessment of depression in older adults and those with cancer. Results: The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM) criteria that appear to be relevant to both older adults and cancer patients are anhedonia, concentration difficulties, sleep disturbances, psychomotor retardation/agitation, and loss of energy. Possible alternative criteria that may be important considerations included constructs such as loss of purpose, loneliness, and irritability in older adults. Among cancer patients, tearfulness, social withdrawal, and not participating in treatment despite ability to do so were identified as potentially important symptoms. Conclusions: Current DSM criteria may not adequately assess depression in older cancer patients and alternative criteria may be important to inform the understanding and identification of depression in this population. Enhancing diagnostic accuracy of depression is important as both the over-diagnosis and under-diagnosis is accompanied with significant costs. Thus, continued research exploring the phenomenology and identifying effective indicators of depression in older cancer patients is needed. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Resilience protective factors in an older adult population: a qualitative interpretive meta-synthesis

Authors:
BOLTON Kristin W., PRAETORIUS Regina T., SMITH-OSBORNE Alexa
Journal article citation:
Social Work Research, 40(3), 2016, pp.171-182.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Resilience is conceptualized as a dynamic process that leads to positive outcomes in the face of adversity. The resilience process consists of the activation and interaction of protective and vulnerability factors after encountering adversity. The present study seeks to integrate and synthesize the findings of existing qualitative studies premised in highlighting and exploring the protective factors associated with resilience in an older adult population through the systematic process of qualitative interpretive meta-synthesis. Results revealed nine distinct protective factors: (1) external connections, (2) meaningfulness, (3) previous experience with hardship, (4) grit, (5) self-care, (6) self-acceptance, (7) positive perspective on life, (8) independence, and (9) altruism. Findings offer researchers and practitioners a greater understanding of the protective factors associated with resilience among older adults and contribute to the advancement of resilience theory. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

A review of conceptualisation of expressed emotion in caregivers of older adults with dementia

Authors:
LI Chao-Yin, MURRAY MaryAnne
Journal article citation:
Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24(3-4), 2015, pp.332-343.
Publisher:
John Wiley and Sons

Aims and Objectives: To clarify the concept of ‘expressed emotion’ and its application to caregivers of older adults with dementia. Background: Expressed emotion has been a useful construct for understanding the quality of family relationships affecting patients with mental illness and their caregivers. However, this concept has been developed without precisely defining ‘expressed emotion’ as it pertains to dementia patients. Clarity regarding expressed emotion will enable nurses to apply knowledge of expressed emotion and provide important information for the development of new clinical interventions for this specific population. Design: Integrative review. Methods: A review of literature on expressed emotion by caregivers of older adults with dementia. The inclusion criteria were: (1) published in English or Chinese during 1970–2012; (2) included both research and theoretical review articles on expressed emotion in nursing and other disciplines such as psychology, psychiatry and sociology. Initially, 236 articles were screened, and finally, 32 articles were evaluated for this review. Results: Emotional expression and expressed emotion were discussed to clarify the distinctions and address overlap between these two similar terms. In addition, expressed emotion was examined further from three different aspects: trait or state, social control and cross-cultural. Finally, the results of reviewed papers for expressed emotion on dementia patients were explored and synthesised. Conclusion: A conceptual definition and a theoretical framework for the concept of expressed emotion are urgently needed to further our understanding of this critical phenomenon. With increasing attention to caregiving for patients with dementia, including the concept of expressed emotion in the research of this field may accelerate understanding of the importance of the family dynamics in advanced ageing caregiving. Relevance to clinical practice: The expressed emotion concept could guide much of current clinical practice and help professional nurses understand the family's experience and perspective on mental illness, especially regarding dementia within the family. (Publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts