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Range and Capacity Review Group: second report: the future care of older people in Scotland

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive Range and Capacity Review Group
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
72p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This is the second and final report from the Scottish Executive Health Department’s Range and Capacity Review Group The National Delayed Discharge Action Plan (March 2002) highlighted the need to carry out a range and capacity review of community care services for older people, and led to the establishment of this Range and Capacity Review Group. The first report of the Group Projections of community care service users, workforce and costs was published on 16 July 2004. This was modelling work that presented 7 scenarios and then, for each of these scenarios, set out statistical projections of the numbers of community care service users and of workforce and cost implications at a Scotland level up to 2019. It did not set the context for care, nor did it make recommendations about the way forward. These matters are addressed in this report. This report does not provide, as some might have expected, a detailed analysis of the different models that were outlined in the Group’s first report. As the work progressed it quickly became apparent that the national review group could not decide what should happen at local level. Of the scenarios in the first report, scenario 7 (the joint future model) is the one that fits best with the direction of policy and practice in Scotland. But the way in which a joint future model is delivered in one area will be different from that in another area, because of the mix of existing services (and their inter-action, of which more is said later about a whole systems approach), and the local population and geography. This report therefore sets out: the group's understanding of the big problems, the context in the light of recent, major reports (notably Building a Health Service Fit for the Future (the Kerr Report), Delivering for Health, Better Outcomes for Older People, and the 21st Century Social Work Review), and a vision for care for the increasing ageing population in years to come. The report is therefore neither an action plan nor a model of care, but it sets out principles, a vision for care that has to be worked out in detail at local level.

Book Full text available online for free

Fifty plus: information for older people

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive Health Department
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh
Journal article

Time for caring? Elderly care employees' occupational activities in the cross draft between their work priorities, 'must-do's' and meaningfulness

Authors:
NILSSON Emma, NILSSON Kerstin
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Care Coordination, 20(1-2), 2017, pp.8-16.
Publisher:
Sage

An increasing number of older people in the population will bring new challenges for the society and care coordination. One of the most important questions in care coordination is the employees’ work performance. The overall aim of this study was to examine care employees’ experience of factors that rule how they allocate their time and tasks in the care work. The study was qualitative and consists of focus group interviews with 36 employees in elderly care in five Swedish municipalities. Much of the work that care employees perform is controlled by others in the municipality organised health care. The employees had a limited possibility to decide what should be given priority in their work. However, the employees who participated in the focus group interviews did not want to prioritise tasks and duties they felt were faulty or in direct conflict with their own convictions. When employees experienced that the assistance assessments were correct and helpful to the individual elderly patient this contributed to the employees’ priority and performance of the task. The formal and informal control systems caused the employees’ priority to be mainly quantitative and visible work tasks, rather than more qualitative tasks and care giving to the elderly. In the intention to organise good care coordination that fit each elderly patients’ need it is important that those who work closest to the patient to a greater extent are given the opportunity to make their voice heard in decisions of care planning and assistance assessments. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

What happens to the “hand that rocked the cradle”? a study of elderly abuse in India

Authors:
BHATTACHARYA Sonali, BHATTACHARYA Shubhaseesh
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adult Protection, 16(3), 2014, pp.166-179.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse the possible causes of elderly abuse in India and its repercussions for the society, based on the real cases and reports. Design/methodology/approach: A multiple case study approach has been used for the study sourced from archival newspaper reports, crime reports, and narration. Findings: Greater vigilance and more effective legislation would be required to solve the problem related to elder abuse. Originality/value: There is not much study of causes, consequences, effectiveness of the legal system with respect to elderly abuse in India. In that way, it will be a unique contribution. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Gambling among older adults in Singapore. Some preliminary empirical findings

Author:
NG Vincent C.K.
Journal article citation:
Asia Pacific Journal of Social Work and Development, 21(1), June 2011, pp.18-30.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Gambling is a widely accepted social and recreation activity in Singapore, with surveys suggesting that around 58% of the population have gambled at least once in the last 12 months. The purpose of this study was to shed light on gambling among older adults in Singapore.  A sample of 74 adults aged 60 and above who were participants of a community-based elderly outreach programme was surveyed. The survey included questions relating to gambling participation and the perception of the respondents.  The findings indicated that 27% of the respondents had gambled in the past month and their favourite gambling game was the lottery 4D. Those who gambled were found to have more free time than those who did not (64 hours per week versus 38 hours per week). Almost all the respondents (97%) did not know where to go to get help for problem gambling.  The article concludes that public education campaigns on problem gambling should be re-designed to reach out to older adults.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Optimising quality sleep among older people in the community and care homes: Some key findings from a four-year collaborative research project

Authors:
VENN Susan, et al
Journal article citation:
Generations Review, 20(4), October 2010, Online only
Publisher:
British Society of Gerontology

The SomnIA (Sleep in Ageing) project aimed to undertake a range of studies relating to understanding poor sleep in later life. SomnIA is a four year NDA Collaborative Research Project which comprises eight workpackages aimed at (a) understanding poor sleep in later life in the community and in care homes, (b) devising interventions to help with poor sleep in the community and in care homes, and (c) dissemination through academic and practitioner conferences and workshops, briefing papers and journal articles, and through the creation of a module on ‘Sleep problems in Later Life’ for the Healthtalkonline website. Key findings are presented.

Journal article

Does age at onset have clinical significance in older adults with bipolar disorder?

Authors:
CHU David, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 25(12), December 2010, pp.1266-1271.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Using data from the Bipolar Disorder Center for Pennsylvanians Study, a randomised controlled study of people with bipolar disorder, this analysis looked at factors including demographics, psychopathology and treatment response to examine the effects of age at onset in bipolar disorder in older adults. The analysis covered 61 subjects aged 60 years and older, grouped by early (less than 40 years) or late (more than 40 years) age at onset. The groups were compared on psychiatric comorbidity, medical burden, and percentage of days well during study participation. The results showed that patients with early and late onset experienced similar percentages of days well, while those with early onset had a slightly higher percentage of days depressed than those with late onset. The researchers concluded that distinguishing older adults with bipolar disorder by early or late age at onset has limited clinical usefulness.

Book Full text available online for free

Understanding the risks of social exclusion across the life course: older age

Authors:
BECKER Elizabeth, BOREHAM Richard
Publisher:
Great Britain. Cabinet Office. Social Exclusion Task Force
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
92p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Older people can face a range of problems which can be thought of as risk markers of social exclusion: low income, limited contact with others, and poor health. This report describes the multidimensional nature of social exclusion and the risk markers older people experience, and asks how clusters of markers vary. It then discusses risk marker dynamics and policy directions.

Journal article

Who benefits from volunteering? Variations in perceived benefits

Authors:
MORROW-HOWELL Nancy, HONG Song-Lee, TANG Fengyan
Journal article citation:
Gerontologist, 49(1), February 2009, pp.91-102.
Publisher:
Gerontological Society of America

The purpose of this study was to document the benefits of volunteering perceived by older adults and to explain variation in these self-perceived benefits. This is a quantitative study of 13 volunteer programs in the US and 401 older adults serving in those programs. Program directors completed telephone interviews, and older volunteers completed mailed surveys. Volunteer-level and program-level data were merged. Older volunteers reported a wide variety of benefits to the people they served, themselves, their families, and communities. More than 30% reported that they were "a great deal better off" because of volunteering, and almost 60% identified a benefit to their families. When considering only individual characteristics, lower-income and lower-educated volunteers reported more benefit. Yet, aspects of the volunteer experience, like amount of involvement, adequacy of training and ongoing support, and stipends, were more important in understanding who benefits from volunteering. These findings suggest that characteristics of volunteer programs can be strengthened to maximize the benefits of volunteering to older adults. These characteristics are more mutable by public policies and organizational procedures than individual characteristics. Focusing on the recruitment of lower socioeconomic status older adults may result in an increase in benefits from the growth of volunteering.

Journal article

Mistreatment of older people in the United Kingdom: findings from the first National Prevalence Study

Authors:
BIGGS Simon, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Elder Abuse and Neglect, 20(1), January 2009, pp.1-14.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The National Prevalence Study of Elder Mistreatment took place in 2006 and included 2,111 respondents aged 66 and over from England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland who answered a face-to-face questionnaire. Mistreatment by family members, close friends or care workers was reported by 2.6%, with the most common form being neglect (1.1%) followed by financial abuse (0.6%), psychological abuse (0.4%), physical abuse (0.4%) and sexual abuse (0.2%). Women were significantly more likely to have experienced mistreatment than men but there were gender differences according to type of abuse and perpetrator, and divergent patterns for neglect, financial and interpersonal abuse. Further analysis of the data also indicated that the likelihood of mistreatment varied according to socioeconomic position and health status.

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