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Book Full text available online for free

Footcare services for older people: a resource pack for commissioners and service providers

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
26p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This publication is for commissioners and service providers. It explains why footcare is important and describes service providers, types of service, what good services should look like and what they should achieve, and developing services.

Book

Taking prevention forward: a directory of examples

Authors:
LEWIS Helen, MILNE Alisoun
Publisher:
Anchor Research
Publication year:
1999
Place of publication:
Oxford

This directory is the final part of the work commissioned from the Nuffield Institute of Health, University of Leeds for the National Preventative Task Group. Its aim is to provide some more concrete examples of preventative approaches and services currently in operation around the country. While most of the examples relate to older people, who were the focus of the original work, thre are also examples relating to other adults, in line with the national policy of 'promoting independence'. (need to refer to others in this series)

Book Full text available online for free

Financial abuse and scams: guidance for councillors, directors, managers and social work practitioners

Author:
ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
Publisher:
Association of Directors of Adult Social Services
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
14
Place of publication:
London

This guide gives some key information on the effects of scams on the continued health and wellbeing of individuals and it is aimed at those working in the adult social care sector. Each year scams cause approximately between £5 and £10 billion worth of detriment to UK consumers. Victims of scams, specifically the elderly and consumers made vulnerable by their circumstances, experience deteriorating health, independence and loss of self-confidence. These give rise to additional financial costs on the health and social care sector which could be prevented through earlier intervention and protection. The inevitable consequences of being a victim are also far more costly in terms of deteriorating health than with pure financial loss. An ageing population, reduced cognitive function in older people and social isolation further exacerbate the risk and impact of financial abuse and scams. The document provides essential advice and tips, designed to help consider responses to the risks of financial abuse associated with scams. They are not exhaustive but suggest areas of specific focus, and comprise: top tips for Councillors; top tips for Safeguarding Adults Boards; top tips for Health & Wellbeing Boards; and top tips for Social Care Practitioners. Three illustrative case studies are included. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Who knows best? Top tips for managing the crisis: older people's emergency admissions to hospital

Authors:
GLASBY Jon, et al
Publisher:
University of Birmingham. School of Social Policy
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
12
Place of publication:
Birmingham

This resource identifies ten key themes, or ‘top tips’, which could help health and social care services to reduce inappropriate hospital admissions. It has been developed from a national research project which involved interviews and focus groups with older people and their families, and front-line health and social care professionals. It is argued that these ‘perceptions’ from older people and front-line staff are important as they can have a significant impact on how people live their life and access services. The themes cover: not making older people feel they are a burden; making community alternatives to hospital easier to access; to distinguish between ‘inappropriate’ and ‘preventable’ admissions; the need for early action; the importance role of adult social care; and the importance of engaging with older people to understand and respond to the increasing number of emergency admissions. Quotations from older people, their families and professionals are included throughout to illustrate key points. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Medication in extra care housing: factsheet

Author:
HOLDEN Michael
Publisher:
Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

Update of the 2008 Housing LIN factsheet on the handling of medicines in extra care housing (ECH), taking into account recent policy, legislation and guidance. The factsheet highlights good practice recommendations covering areas such as safe storage, monitoring and record keeping, over-the-counter, medicines adherence support, and consent and choice. It also outlines additional areas for consideration when supporting people with dementia, for people using telecare devices to manage their own medicine, and supporting adherence to medication. It also sets out key lessons learned and provides a list of useful frequently asked questions. The factsheet is aimed at practitioners, commissioners, care service managers and housing managers working in extra care housing. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Person-centred thinking with older people: 6 essential practices

Authors:
SANDERSON Helen, BOWN Helen, BAILEY Gill
Publisher:
Jessica Kingsley
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
96
Place of publication:
London

Drawing on a wealth of experience of working with older people, this book presents six essential person-centred practices. Person-centred practices are a key way to provide the best possible care and support for older people and help them to be active and valued members of the community. Each of the practices is designed to support the individual and put what is important to and for the person at the forefront of their care. Each practice has been tailored so that older people can express more easily what does and does not work for them. By actively listening and making each person feel appreciated, the practices represent practical tools for frontline practitioners to form good relationships with people in their care. With supporting stories and full colour photographs to illustrate how person-centred thinking and practice is used in real-life settings, the book contains many examples to help practitioners to overcome challenges and to implement positive, effective changes to care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Managing chronic pain in older people

Author:
SCHOFIELD Patricia
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 109(30), 2013, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

This article presents the results of a collaborative project between the British Pain Society and British Geriatric Society to produce guidelines on pain management for older people. The guidelines are the first of their kind in the UK and aim to provide best practice for the management of pain to all health professionals working with older people in any care setting. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Findings from housing with care research: practice examples

Authors:
BLOOD Imogen, PANELL Jenny, COPEMAN Ian
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
28p.
Place of publication:
York

This report draws together practical examples of ways of working from two reports: “Boundaries of roles and responsibilities in housing with care” and “Affordability, choices and quality of life in housing with care”. It highlights ways of working in different housing with care schemes, drawing on the two studies and considering their implications in very practical terms. The practice guide is aimed at people managing frontline housing with care schemes, commissioners and senior managers in housing organisations, social services and health, and frontline staff, older people and their relatives. The practice guide: identifies five key topics in housing with care which could benefit from improvement; summarises what older people and their relatives say they value in housing with care; and presents practical examples.

Book Full text available online for free

Medication in extra care housing

Author:
OPUS PHARMACY SERVICES
Publisher:
Care Services Improvement Partnership. Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
London

The handling of medicines in Extra Care Housing (ECH) can be difficult to manage because of a lack of guidance relating specifically to this particular environment. Care homes are completely different from extra care housing. A comparable model of care is a domiciliary care agency. If personal care is provided within an ECH scheme, this must be provided by a registered provider, hence the Care Standards Act 2000, National Minimum Standards for Domiciliary Care and the Commission for Social Care Inspection (CSCI) published guidance are all relevant. Any support with medication should incorporate the principles of safe practice set out in the guidance published by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain ‘The Handling of Medicines in Social Care’. This factsheet is aimed at practitioners, commissioners, care services managers and housing managers in extra care housing, an environment not specifically referred to in any guidance on the handling of medicines.

Book

A guide for assisted living: towards lifehome 21

Authors:
BRE, 3DREID RESEARCH, ROYAL INSTITUTE OF BRITISH ARCHITECTS
Publisher:
Royal Institute of British Architects
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
96p.
Place of publication:
London

As life expectancy increases, traditional arrangements for supporting those with long-term health issues are becoming unsustainable. The assisted living agenda is part of the solution. It is about helping people with chronic health conditions to live active, independent and dignified lives and stimulating new thinking based on contemporary and emerging technologies. Funded by the Technology Strategy Board under the ALIP1 project, this illustrated design guide about assisted living considers the built environment along with the integration of digital infrastructure in homes. It looks in turn at housing standards, ergonomic data, access issues, space standards (including a case study for adapting a typical terraced house), an overview of digital connectivity, and guidance on digital assisted living technologies. The guide is aimed at all those who have to take decisions on the appropriate design, specification, construction and adaptation of ‘assisted living enabled’ buildings, including architects, developers, designers, builders, health care workers, and designers of health care equipment.

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