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Journal article Full text available online for free

Nutritional care and older people

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 14.5.09, 2009, pp.32-33.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Highlights research findings around the nutritional care of older people.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Who knows best? Older people's contribution to understanding and preventing avoidable hospital admissions

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
18 mins 50 secs
Place of publication:
London

This video summarises the key findings of a research project conducted by the University of Birmingham’s Health Services Management Centre and the Department of Social Policy and Social Work which interviewed 104 older people about their emergency admissions to hospital. The research looked at how the older people were admitted to hospital, whether they felt this was the best place for them and what alternatives might have been explored. Similar questions were also asked of a GP and / or hospital doctor representing as many of these older people as possible. Overall, the study found that most older people were admitted to hospital appropriately. Only nine of 104 older people (almost 9%) felt that hospital was not the right place for them. Key findings covered in the video include: delays in seeking help; prevention and early intervention; poor communication; proactive initial approaches; working with GPs and paramedics; and the underfunding of social care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Improving oral health for adults in care homes

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

This quick guide, developed for care home managers and their staff, explains how to achieve good oral health for people who live in care homes. Based on the NICE guideline on oral health for adults in care homes, it covers: how poor oral health can affect people’s ability to eat, speak and socialise normally; how to carry out an oral health assessment; the knowledge and skills care staff need to know to support residents maintain good oral health; and what the Care Quality Commission expects from care homes. The guide includes an oral health assessment tool and provides links to further information. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Dignity in care: nutrition for older people at home

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
10 minutes 23 seconds
Place of publication:
London

This film highlights the role of good nutritional care and hydration for older people living in their own homes. Food and mealtimes are very important to older people. Listening to what older people wish to eat and by preparing fresh food, the meal time experience can be enhanced. This film was previously available under the title 'Nutritional care for older people.' (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Co-production and participation: older people with high support needs

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
42p.
Place of publication:
London

This report provides a summary of the research literature on the participation and co-production of older people with high support needs. It identifies the benefits and barriers to participation and also includes a small-scale survey of good practice. The report notes that 'older people with high support needs' are a diverse group, falling into two strands of disadvantage - age and disability. Factors that may contribute to high support needs are also identified as: gender; ethnicity; religion and belief; lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people; poverty; learning disability; dementia and mental health problems; sensory impairment and housing contexts. The report goes on to identify the benefits and barriers to participation and different ways of involving older people. A resources section sets out resources available to support co-production in social care, including assessment tools and examples of practice and service development undertaken in co-production. The conclusion offers recommendations for improving practice. The report will be of particular interest to commissioners of social and health care services; people working in housing provision; service users and others developing the co-production/participation agenda in care provision and service development.

BookDigital Media Full text available online for free

Personal budgets briefing: learning from the experiences of older people and their carers

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London

This briefing provides a summary of older people's and carers experiences of using self-directed support and personal budgets. It is based on a six month study commissioned from a joint team from Acton Shapiro, the National Centre for Independent Living (NCIL) and the Social Policy Research Unit (SPRU). The briefing covers moving to a personal budget, deciding on personal budget, being assessed, resource allocation, support planning, ways of holding a personal budget, obtaining support, the role of carers, management of the personal budget, the role of external organisations and monitoring arrangements.

Book Full text available online for free

Managing risk, minimising restraint

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
3p.
Place of publication:
London

This briefing examine the use of restraint in care homes and approaches to minimise its use. It presents some of the learning from a review of the literature on the use of restraint in care homes for older people and an exploration of practice. The briefing looks at what might constitute restraint, whether restraint is ever right, the links between risk and restraint and developing knowledge and skills.

Book Full text available online for free

Nutritional care and older people

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
London

This summary examines nutritional care in relation to older people and is based on the nutritional care and mealtimes section of SCIE's Dignity in Care guide. Three main sections cover: the nature of the problem; the foundations for good nutritional care; and managing nutritional care and mealtimes.

Book Full text available online for free

Teaching and learning human growth and development in social work education: older people

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, LE RICHE Pat, BOUSHEL Margaret, SHARLAND Elaine
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
68p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

SCIE’s latest knowledge review examines social work teaching on human growth and development with regard to older people, looking particularly at what promotes or hinders successful learning outcomes. Teaching on human growth and development is a central requirement of qualifying social work education and the focus on older people is particularly relevant as we improve our policies and practice in response to an ageing population.

Book Full text available online for free

SCIE research briefing 28: assistive technology and older people

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, BEECH Roger, ROBERTS Diane
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
11p.
Place of publication:
London

The term ‘assistive technology’ incorporates a wide variety of devices. Assistive technology can be supportive, preventive or responsive. The increasing proportion of older people in the population makes the use of assistive technology an attractive option in social services. Perceptions vary as to whether or not assistive technology has sufficient benefits. Existing research supports the greater use of assistive technology but further evaluation and ‘local learning’ is needed. The views and needs of people using assistive technology need to be taken into account.

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