Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 17

Journal article

Appreciating impact: evaluating small voluntary organizations in the United Kingdom

Authors:
REED Jan, JONES Diana, IRVINE Julie
Journal article citation:
Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary and Nonprofit Organizations, 16(2), June 2005, pp.123-141.
Publisher:
Springer
Place of publication:
New York

Within the mixed economy of care in the United Kingdom there are debates about the ways in which impact can be evaluated, in order to shape funding and policy decisions. One of the tensions evident in this debate is whether the evaluation approach should reflect the perspectives and goals of the voluntary organizations and their members, or whether evaluation should reflect the wider goals of the whole system of provision. This paper explores this tension by reporting on a study that used Appreciative Inquiry to evaluate 10 small-scale not-for-profit schemes for older people. The data indicated some unexpected and long-term impacts that demonstrated the distinctiveness of the sector. Subsequently the findings were mapped on to the “impact grid” developed by Wilding and Lacey (2003). While this was straightforward at the levels of individuals and interorganizationally, it was more difficult at the sector/community level, suggesting that more work needs to be done to bring these two perspectives together.

Journal article

Past the age of consent? a discussion of some ethical issues arising in a study involving older people

Authors:
REED Jan, PAYTON Valerie Roskell
Journal article citation:
Health Care in Later Life, 1(1), 1996, pp.51-61.

Discusses some of the dilemmas faced by a research team in trying to conduct a research study in an ethical way that respected the perspectives of the older people studied. The article points out that the issues of power and control is particularly important when reaching with older people, who are an already marginalised and disempowered group. Gives an account of some of the strategies used to try to ensure that the study was not rigidly controlled by the researchers.

Book

Meaningful and effective involvement of older people: a guide for care, health and housing agencies

Authors:
REED Jan, COOK Glenda
Publisher:
Counsel and Care
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
38p.
Place of publication:
London

This publication gives guidance to professionals about how to effectively involve older people in the development of services. After working with older people, professionals recommend that organisations ensure that intention; inclusion; information; infrastructure; integration; influence and the impact of decisions on older people should be adhered to in order to create better ways of involving them in debates and decisions about the way that services are developed.  Discussions with older people have revealed that they feel a need to be involved and, importantly, to make a difference – these guidelines are designed to help this happen. They feel that local authorities and providers make decisions without consulting them and therefore miss out on the expertise and experience that they can provide. This will go some way towards both helping older people feel that their opinions are being listened to as well as helping organisations benefit from their expertise.

Journal article

Assessing the Registered Nursing Care Contribution for older people in care homes: issues of reliability and validity

Authors:
REED Jan, WATSON Bill, COOK Margaret
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 15(2), March 2007, pp.136-145.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The present paper reports on a study designed to investigate the validity and reliability of the Registered Nursing Care Contribution (RNCC) tool for assessing the level of nursing care required by care home residents. Care plan data from 186 residents in participating care homes were assessed by multiple assessors using the RNCC tool (i.e. care home registered nurses, a nurse researcher, an external care home expert and a nurses consultant). The Minimum Data Set (MDS) rating was used as a validated comparison. The findings from the study indicated that there were disparities between the RNCC and MDS bandings, and between different raters, with the external care home expert achieving the closest agreement with the MDS. This suggests that the use of the RNCC tool varies considerably according to the assessor, which also suggests that training of users is needed to ensure consistency and reliability. However, the difference between the outcomes of using the RNCC tool and the MDS suggests that assessment of nursing need may need to be re-examined to ensure validity.

Journal article Full text available online for free

A literature review to explore integrated care for older people

Authors:
REED Jan, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Integrated Care, 5, January 2005, Online only
Publisher:
International Foundation for Integrated Care

This paper reports on some of the findings of a literature review commissioned to explore integrated care for older people. The process of revising included finding and selecting literature from multidisciplinary sources, and encompassed both published papers and ‘grey’ literature, i.e. material which had not been reviewed for publication. The study found that thinking has moved on from a focus on the problems of accessing services to exploring ways in which they may function in an integrated way. The study shows how thinking on integrated care for older people has developed, and knowledge of micro, mezzo and macro strategies is now more available.

Book

Getting old is not for cowards: comfortable, healthy ageing

Authors:
REED Jan, et al
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2003
Pagination:
70p.
Place of publication:
York

The project reported on here was commissioned by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation as a way of exploring different ideas about health for older people, alternatives to medical models that defined health simply as the absence of disease. In these medical models, with their emphasis on physiology and cure, growing old becomes a process of experiencing increasing deficits and problems, and the goals of intervention are to prevent or treat these problems. Much medical research and the resources to support it therefore concentrate on these deficits, and define ‘healthy ageing’ as avoiding or escaping them. Partly in response to this deficit model, a movement has developed which seeks to promote the idea of growing older as positive experience. If services are based on ideas of health that have developed in professional and policy debates, then they run the risk of being, at best, irrelevant to the needs of older people and, at worst, dismissive of their views and damaging to them. Services that are designed to promote health for older people, therefore, need to take into account the ideas and wishes of older people themselves.

Journal article

Improving communication between hospitals and care homes: the development of a daily living plan for older people

Authors:
REED Jan, STANLEY David
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 11(4), July 2003, pp.356-363.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Describes a practice development project that produced a user-led daily living plan, developed in partnership with older people and staff from health and social care settings and designed to facilitate communication of the daily living preferences of older people, ensuring that continuity of care and support could be maintained and their future care planned on an individualised basis when they move from hospital to a care home. In developing and implementing the plan more effective person-centred communication between hospitals and care homes was achieved, and some of the hospital staff's ideas about care homes changed.

Journal article

Making a move: care-home residents' experiences of relocation

Authors:
REED Jan, et al
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 23(2), March 2003, pp.225-241.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

Reports on a research study to identify patterns of relocation across care-homes, describe the strategies used by care-home staff to manage moves, and to explore older peoples experiences of relocations. A questionnaire was distributed to care homes in two English local authorities to determine the incidence of relocation. 10 homes were also approached to take party in further studies which included case-not audits and interviews with staff and 12 older people who had relocated. This article focuses on the experiences and narratives of older people involved in relocation. The study found that the pattern of moves was complex and that some residents were active in deciding to relocate and in the selection of the relocation home. However, for residents to have an active role, they must be given support to access the information required for decision-making and to implement their decisions.

Journal article

Going home from hospital - an appreciative inquiry study

Authors:
REED Jan, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 10(1), January 2002, pp.36-45.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Reports on a project that involved a number of agencies and groups, including older people, working together to examine and develop practice in going home from hospital. The project was stimulated by a whole-system event, and was based on appreciative inquiry (AI) methodology, which has roots in both action research and organisational development. In AI, the research is directed towards appreciating what it is about the social world that is positive, and exploring this. The study was planned around three workshops to streamline data collection and analysis. Group members were also required to carry out some activities between workshops. Invitations were sent out to groups and individuals previously identified as involved or interested in the discharge process across one health district. Provides overview of the study, and explores some of the issues involved when working with service users and providers as co-researchers.

Journal article

Settling in and moving on: transience and older people in care homes

Authors:
REED Jan, PAYTON Valerie Roskell, BOND Senga
Journal article citation:
Social Policy and Administration, 32(2), June 1998, pp.151-165.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Examines the experiences of older people who moved into nursing and residential care homes, interviewing them at four points, from before the move to up to six months afterwards. A key finding was that older people were actively involved in the process of settling into homes and forming new friendships. Participant data also indicated that these older people had often experienced many moves in recent years, as their need for care had changed, and following them through after their inclusion in the study indicated that, for some, there were more moves to come. These data place the debates about assessment, and the identified problem of 'misplacement' in a different light.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts