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Journal article

Residential care for adults

Author:
PEACE Sheila
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, 9, April 2000, pp.36-38.
Publisher:
Community Care

The research reviewed in this article considers contrasting approaches to residential care, and the different lifestyles the residents may experience as a result.

Book

Private lives in public places: a research-based critique of residential life in local authority old people's homes

Authors:
WILLCOCKS Dianne, PEACE Sheila, KELLAHER Leonie
Publisher:
Tavistock
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
212p., tables, bibliog.
Place of publication:
London
Book

Adult lives: a life course perspective

Editors:
KATZ Jeanne, PEACE Sheila, SPURR Sue, (eds.)
Publisher:
Policy Press
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
496p.
Place of publication:
Bristol

With the ageing of the population in Western industrialised societies, there is a growing need for a comprehensive look at the past, present, and future of adult lives. This diverse collection of articles takes a holistic approach to understanding ageing, drawing on biography and autobiography to contextualize the process. These articles contribute to a shared life course perspective to understand how those living and working together in an ageing society relate to each other. The book covers a number of key issues including: quality of life; social relationships; the environment; human rights; ethical considerations; social work issues; international issues; and the complexity of real lives. This book will be of interest to those who wish to contextualise ageing, understanding how lives can be transformed through policy and practice, and consider the lived experience.

Book

Reflecting on user-involvement and participatory research

Editors:
PEACE Sheila, HUGHES Jonathan, (eds.)
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
84p.
Place of publication:
London

The editors have collected together a series of papers showing how professional researchers can adopt ways of working with older people that better recognises their potential contributions. The writers look at how research organisations select, use and involve older people in carrying out research, how effective they are and the advantages and disadvantages of using them as a resource. Issues of adequate financial support, tokenism, avoiding patronising attitudes, and the importance of collaboration between all parties are raised as particularly important considerations. A qualitative case study listens to older carers using a range of research methods including diaries, focus groups and participant observation. A critique of experience to date, including the broader European perspective, suggests that the involvement of older researchers can benefit both the research and the older individual. However, it appears that these benefits do not necessarily translate into improvements in service quality. It is concluded that putting research into practice remains a challenge.

Journal article

Adult care

Author:
PEACE Sheila
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, April 2006, pp.5-12.
Publisher:
Community Care

The author looks at research which highlights the health care needs of older people resident in care homes. The second study featured looks at how care home staff and NHS professionals work together.

Book

Environment and identity in later life

Authors:
PEACE Sheila, et al
Publisher:
Open University
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
182p.
Place of publication:
Maidenhead

Although with increasing old age an increasing proportion of older people live in age segregated settings, for most older people domestic homes in mixed communities continue to be the location of everyday life. The person/environment relationship is a complex one that involves the formation, maintenance and expression of self-identity. As people age and experience losses in other domains of life, their relationships with the places where they live can change and become more critical. This study looked at homes, neighbourhoods, and the spaces in between. It included a range of housing from residential care homes and sheltered housing to different types and tenures of flats and houses in different sizes of settlements.

Book

Involving older people in research

Editor:
PEACE Sheila
Publisher:
Centre for Policy on Ageing
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
28p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Initiatives have developed throughout the UK that seek to give people 'a greater individual say in how they live their lives and the services they need to help them to do so'. Research funders have taken on board the need for researchers to address issues of user participation within their proposed research outlining how these can be met.

Journal article

Adult care

Author:
PEACE Sheila
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, April 2002, pp.5-10.
Publisher:
Community Care

Reports on how working conditions of care home staff, and asks whether the measures being taken to raise standards truly address the employment climate the sector currently finds itself in.

Journal article

‘Option recognition’ in later life: variations in ageing in place

Authors:
PEACE Sheila, HOLLAND Caroline, KELLAHER Leonie
Journal article citation:
Ageing and Society, 31(5), July 2011, pp.734-757.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press

The person-environment system is fundamental to defining the quality of life in older people - the more competent the person the less dependent they are on environmental circumstances. While this focuses on the micro-environment of accommodation, it can be applied to the macro-environment of community living. This paper, using data gathered from 54 ethnically diverse participants in England, examines both the micro and macro scales. It develops the theoretical content of the person-competence model and considers the complexity of person–environment interaction. The paper suggests that, over time, some people find that their attachments to particular environments are compromised by declining competence or changes in the environment. Findings suggest that the point at which change impacts on an individual's independence and well-being is reached when adaptive behaviour cannot rebalance the macro- and micro-environmental scale. This point, termed ‘option recognition’, leads to a range of personal responses including the modification of behaviour or environment, seeking structural support using formal and informal services, and potentially relocation. In conclusion, ‘option recognition’ sets out to capture the extent of environmental impact that can affect decision-making in older people, and point to the importance of both change and continuity in the environment.

Journal article

Adult care

Author:
PEACE Sheila
Journal article citation:
Research Matters, 16, October 2003, pp.5-10.
Publisher:
Community Care

This article draws on research from two studies, the first of which considers the capacity of nursing homes in England to provide rehabilitation and intermediate care; and the second which compares the quality of health care provided for residents by nursing homes with those living at home.

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