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St. Monica Trust: domiciliary care services report

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
Oxford Brookes University. Institute of Public Care
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
55p.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Demand for domiciliary based services for older people is growing in response to population demand and to policy demands for effective alternatives to residential and hospital based care. In addition, the client-provider relationship is changing, with local authorities and, to some extent, health authorities being removed from the contracting transaction, and more direct choice and control for service users. This report was prepared for St Monica Trust with the aim of: identifying the different forms of domiciliary service which can be provided, from home help to intensive rehabilitative services and end of life care; describing key approaches and business models, and consideration of their cost and business development implications; and identifying examples of existing services. The research comprised an analysis of existing published materials, and telephone conversations with a few existing services to explore the financial costing and employment issues. The report concludes by considering future marketing and business strategies, especially in relation to: local authority and GP consortia; personal budget and individual budget holders; and self-funders.

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Housing for older people in Wales: a sector review of sheltered housing

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
Oxford Brookes University. Institute of Public Care
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
13
Place of publication:
Oxford

This report explores the current position of sheltered housing in Wales and recommends how providers and local authorities could better realise its potential to ensure it contributes to the delivery of outcomes for older people. It draws on the views of a small number of providers and commissioners of sheltered housing, gathered in both face-to-face and telephone interviews in 2016. It examines current policy drivers and the role sheltered housing is perceived to play within the wider housing and care agenda. It also looks at the current market, including types of providers and levels of supply and the opportunities that could be considered in the future. It highlights the need for a strategic approach to the commissioning and delivery of sheltered housing that is age friendly, enables care and support to be provided, and supports the wider health, housing and social care agendas. The final section looks at the implications for local authorities and providers of sheltered housing. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Extra care housing in Wales: a state of the nation report

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
17
Place of publication:
London

This report, prepared by the Institute for Public Care, provides an up-to-date picture of the current supply of extra care housing in Wales, the challenges facing the market and issues which will need to be considered for future provision. It also sets out some of the outcomes that extra care housing can offer, such as improving the health and wellbeing of residents and the benefits it can provide to the local community. The report offers support for encouraging and facilitating new extra care housing developments in Wales and draws attention to accommodation, care and services already offered in the country. The report makes four key recommendations to expand the provision of extra care housing for older people in Wales: developing a strategic vision on housing for older people; developing a better understand of the outcomes extra care housing can provide; raising awareness of extra care housing as a housing option for those seeking advice and information; and a greater degree of diversity and innovation to deliver services that meet the needs of local communities. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Maritime Charities Funding Group: accommodation, care and support strategy for older seafarers and their dependents: executive summary

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
Oxford Brookes University. Institute of Public Care
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Demographic change amongst the seafarer population is neither uniform nor does it follow the national increase. Over the next ten years it is estimated that for the over 60's population the number of ex Royal Navy personnel will fall by 31 % and former fishermen by 15% although the number of ex merchant seamen aged over 60 is projected to rise by 12%. Overall, this will produce a decline in the number of former seafarers aged over 60 from 569,000 to 439,000. Older seafarers, as for all older people, will have an increasingly complex range of support needs. There is recognition that there is going to be an increasing demand for specialist dementia care facilities, as well as general nursing care needed by older seafarers. This report suggests that the Maritime Charities Funding Group adopts as its vision the following four outcomes in order to prioritise and determine future funding: older seafarers are helped to be independent, healthy and happy; older seafarers are able to live in the community and accommodation they want; older seafarers are able to make informed choices about where and how they live; and older seafarers with complex needs are able to receive high quality specialist care.

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Tameside POPP: local evaluation report

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
Oxford Brookes University. Institute of Public Care
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
52p.
Place of publication:
Oxford

The Partnerships for Older People Projects (POPP) programme, established in 2006, aimed to deliver and evaluate local authority led pilots and initiatives. These were aimed at creating a sustainable shift in resources and culture away from institutional and hospital-based crisis care for older people towards interventions within their own homes and communities. This report describes Tameside’s POPP pilot, Opening Doors for Older People, which aimed to reduce or delay admissions to institutional care or intensive care at home, and support more older people living in their own homes. The report describes the evolution of the POPP, engagement of older people, partnership working, impact on service users, commissioning and market development, personalisation and the economic evaluation. Overall, the local evaluation found qualitative evidence of the positive impact of the POPP pilot on the quality of life and well-being of older people in Tameside. The available quantitative data indicate that it has coincided with a shift away from higher intensity, more costly services, and it has been able to achieve the objective of increasing volunteering by older people.

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Planning for the future of older people accommodation in Powys: a case study

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
Oxford Brookes University. Institute of Public Care
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
11
Place of publication:
Oxford

This case study describes the system wide approach taken by Powys and its partners to developing a comprehensive understanding of the current and future accommodation based needs of its ageing population. The approach brought together qualitative and quantitative data about its housing and care homes, to inform a system wide strategic approach outlined in their market position statement. The case study explains why the approach was needed, the partners involved and the data collection and analysis. It draws out the lessons learnt and concludes with recommendations for other local authorities as they develop a similar strategic approach. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Stamp duty and housing for older people

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
Oxford Brookes University. Institute of Public Care
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
37
Place of publication:
Oxford

This report, carried out for the retirement housebuilder McCarthy and Stone, looks at the potential impact that a reduction in Stamp Duty might have on older people and the wider housing market. It briefly examines the characteristics of the older people and their current housing tenure, the reasons people move, the problems in the UK housing market that may prevent older people ‘downsizing’. It then models the impact of a change in stamp duty. The report illustrates the large numbers of older people living in under-occupied houses and the benefits to them and to the housing market of encouraging or enabling them to move. It suggests that a reduction in Stamp Duty for older people could be a highly effective way of achieving this, at no cost to the Government. Other possible benefits identified include: an improvement in the health and wellbeing of older people through living in accommodation better suited to meet their needs: the development of more retirement accommodation to meet an increase in demand; further stimulation of the housing market by freeing up larger properties for those lower down the housing market ladder. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Health, wellbeing, and the older people housing agenda: briefing paper

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
London

This paper is 1 of 3 which explore the practicalities of delivering housing for older people and maximising the benefits to their health and wellbeing. Poor housing can be a contributory factor to acerbating a number of health conditions, just as good housing may help to limit the effects or incidence of other conditions. Housing factors that influence older people’s health include: cold weather; indoor air quality; house type and design; and neighbourhood effects. The paper is aimed primarily at Health and Wellbeing Board members and seeks to support them in their understanding of: the impact of poor housing on the health and wellbeing outcomes of older people; and the strategic approaches they can take to influence the provision of housing and housing related services to improve the health and wellbeing of their older population. Health and Wellbeing Boards need to establish a shared understanding of health and wellbeing outcomes for their local populations, including the variations in outcome for different groups such as older people. The challenge is to understand how housing contributes to the delivery of these outcomes, and what measures indicate that current housing services are not delivering locally. Development of a strategic approach towards health and wellbeing in older people will require better partnership between housing, health and social care.

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Oxfordshire County Council: support to the early intervention and prevention services for older people and vulnerable adults programme: report on study of care pathways

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
Oxford Brookes University. Institute of Public Care
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
37p.
Place of publication:
Oxford

This project examined the care pathways of older people moving into a care home in order to determine the critical characteristics, circumstances and events which lead to a care home admission. The aim was to identify areas to develop services to prevent or delay care home admission. This study comprised an audit of the files of 115 people admitted to care homes in 2008-2009 in Oxfordshire. Qualitative interviews were also held with 7 older people, 8 of their informal carers and 8 care managers. The older people and carers were asked about the older person’s circumstances prior to entering the care home, including: the previous living arrangements; their health and need for care; the circumstances around the decision to go into care; and whether there were any services or support that could have enabled them to continue living in their own home. The key characteristics identified were the proportion of women (71%), people who live alone (64%), aged 85 and over (58%), with difficulty in walking (56%), urinary incontinence (45%), bowel incontinence (34%), dementia (40%), experiencing a fall in the last 12 months (41%) and admitted from hospital (61%). Some issues were identified that indicate that care home admission may not have been inevitable: the number of people who were not receiving intensive care prior to admission; the limited use and application of specialist services despite the relevance of older people’s conditions; and the lack of earlier follow up to falls and strokes.

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Charging in extra care housing

Author:
OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
Publisher:
DH Care Networks. Housing Learning and Improvement Network
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
16p.
Place of publication:
London

This report considers approaches to charging people living in Extra Care Housing for the various services provided, with a particular focus on social care. It draws on existing research and materials and the experience of a small number of authorities gained through telephone interviews. The report considers how the contractual arrangements for social care within Extra Care Housing can vary, and how this impacts on the charging arrangements. It discusses the various approaches to charging, and how these approaches meet the potentially competing requirements of fairness and choice for the individual, and an ability to provide flexible and responsive care and support services. The report considers key policy initiatives such as the personalisation agenda and mixing tenure within schemes. Case studies in Cheshire, Hartlepool and East Sussex are described. The report concludes that developing a charging policy for social care provided within Extra Care Housing presents commissioners with a complex set of issues to consider including: being clear about the strategic vision for Extra Care Housing; the affordability of the service for residents; developing the most efficient and accountable procurement approaches; and maintaining value for money and equity for residents.

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