Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"older people"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 35

Book

A positive environment: physical and social influences on people with senile dementia in residential care

Author:
NETTEN Ann
Publisher:
Ashgate/University of Kent. Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
134p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Aldershot

Describes an investigation into the relationship between the residential care environment and the welfare of residents with senile dementia. Includes aspects of both the physical and social environment. Sets the results in the context of current policy issues and provides pointers for specifying standards for the care of residents with senile dementia.

Book Full text available online for free

Using survey data to measure changes in the quality of home care: analysis of the older people's user experience survey 2006

Authors:
MALLEY Juliette, NETTEN Ann, JONES Karen
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
110p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

The development of the User experience Survey (UES) and the inclusion of the user’s perspective in the Performance Assessment Framework (PAF) were novel and important steps forward in the world of performance assessment and monitoring of social services. Commentators had previously criticised the lack of connectedness between the performance/quality and user involvement agendas and these developments represented real steps forward in meeting this goal. Analysis from the 2003 extension to the UES for older people has demonstrated that user experience measures can usefully discriminate between Local Authorities (LAs). While his new research raises some important questions, this type of approach is clearly an improvement on performance measurement based on processes and inputs. Fifty authorities took part with representation from all Government Office Regions and LA types. Analysis of responses to the compulsory questions and comparison with responses to these questions nationally revealed very similar proportions responding to each category. We can assume from these findings that the sample of authorities is broadly representative of the views of service users across England.

Journal article

A positive experience? Assessing the effect of the social environment on demented elderly residents of local authority homes

Author:
NETTEN Ann
Journal article citation:
Social Work and Social Sciences Review, 3(1), 1991, pp.46-62.
Publisher:
Whiting and Birch

Reports on a study of residents' functional abilities, using the Social Care Environment Scale and the effect of different regimes on the clients.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Quality of life outcomes for residents and quality ratings of care homes: is there a relationship?

Authors:
NETTEN Ann, et al
Journal article citation:
Age and Ageing, 41(4), 2012, pp.512-517.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Background: Quality ratings of care homes are used by decision makers in the absence of direct information about outcomes. However, there is little evidence about the relationship between regulators' ratings of homes and residents' quality of life outcomes. Objectives: To capture social care-related quality of life (SCRQoL) outcomes for residents and investigate the relationship between outcomes and regulator quality ratings of homes. Methods: Data were collected for 366 residents of 83 English care homes for older people inspected during 2008. Outcomes were measured using the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit (ASCOT). Multivariate multilevel modelling was used to investigate the relationship between quality of life outcomes and star ratings of homes, controlling for resident and home characteristics. Results: Care homes were delivering substantial gains in SCRQoL, but were more successful in delivering ‘basic’ (e.g. personal cleanliness) than higher-order domains (e.g. social participation). Outcomes were associated with quality ratings of residential homes but not of nursing homes. Conclusions: The approach to providing quality ratings by the regulator in England is currently under review. Future quality indicators need to demonstrate their relationship with quality of life outcomes if they are to be a reliable guide to commissioners and private individuals purchasing care. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The development of social well-being in new extra care housing schemes

Authors:
CALLAGHAN Lisa, NETTEN Ann, DARTON Robin
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
60p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
York

The findings of a study conducted between to investigate the development of social well-being for older people moving into 15 new-build extra care housing schemes are reported. The report describes how schemes had begun to develop social activities and community during their first six months, identifying facilitators and barriers to social participation; considers the social climate or ‘atmosphere’ of the schemes one year after opening; discusses differences in individual social well-being one year after opening. Whilst there are some limitations to the study, the findings suggest that extra care housing an provide and environment supportive of social well-being. Key messages are summarised.

Journal article

Provider and care workforce influences on quality of home-care services in England

Authors:
NETTEN Ann, JONES Karen
Journal article citation:
Journal of Aging and Social Policy, 19(3), 2007, pp.81-97.
Publisher:
Routledge
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Over the past decade there has been a major shift away from the in-house provision of home care by local authorities to the commissioning of services from outside providers. A national survey in 2003 indicated lower levels of satisfaction and perception of the quality of care among older users of independent providers compared with in-house providers. This paper reports a study to relate service user views of 121 providers with the characteristics of those providers and, for the most part, characteristics associated with positive perceptions were more prevalent among in-house providers. Multivariate analysis of independent providers suggests that the key influences on service user perceptions of service quality are aspects of the workforce (including age and experience), provider perceptions of staff turnover, and allowance of travel time between home care visits. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

Journal article

Managing the care home closure process: care manager's experiences and views

Authors:
WILLIAMS Jacquette, NETTEN Ann, WARE Patricia
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 37(5), July 2007, pp.909-924.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

This paper reports case study research that set out to identify what care managers do during independent care home closures. Little research has focused on the way in which care homes for older people are closed in England, or what those involved think about the process. This paper reports the activities and views of care managers directly involved in helping older people relocate from care homes that were closed by their owners. During such closures, residents and their families have no choice but to move, usually to a deadline, and with little control over the process. Care managers have a responsibility to help arrange alternative care for those current residents who are publicly funded, and to offer information and support to those funding their own care (the ‘self-funded’). Closure related activities could involve considerable staff time. Care management arrangements, including the organization of teams and provision of needs assessments, varied across authorities. The care managers described drawing on emotional counselling and inter-personal skills, as well as practitioner knowledge and experience, particularly when offering support and advice about finding appropriate new homes. Tensions between aims, constraints on their actions and views of good practice are identified.

Book Full text available online for free

Measuring personal social services outputs for national accounts: services for older people

Authors:
NETTEN Ann, FORDER Julien, SHAPIRO Judith
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
55p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

There is increasing pressure to devise a means of reflecting the outputs of social care in ways that can be used to reflect changes in productivity and efficiency. Professor Sir Tony Atkinson led a review for the Office for National Statistics (ONS) on the future development of government output, productivity and associated price indices (Atkinson, 2005). The review followed Eurostat guidance that countries should be developing direct measures of government services that are individually consumed. As part of this review and with the longer-term objective of improving measurement and understanding of PSS output and productivity in social care, the Department of Health funded work to develop new measures of personal social services (PSS) output and productivity, reflecting best available practice. This paper reports on the results of this work. An extensive search of the literature  identified little theoretical discussion or empirical evidence in the field of measuring productivity and outputs of social care services. Most of the evidence was limited to evaluations of cost effectiveness of specific interventions or services for particular client groups. While valuable in their own right such studies do not address the central question of how to measure government output in social care services across client groups in a way that could be used to monitor changes in productivity over time. The first stage of the work was to develop a theoretically based approach and to identify how it might be applied (at least to some extent) using existing sources of data. The second stage (which we report on here) is to illustrate the application of the approach for measuring for National Accounts purposes outputs and services for older people using routine statistical sources and drawing on data collected as part of a study conducted to inform the Formula Spending Share  The authors start by describing the overall approach to the welfare index and then in turn discuss the methodology and basis for estimating core components of this index: Capacity for Benefit and quality. In section 5 they illustrate the application of the approach to activity data in estimating outputs and changes in levels of output over time. Finally they discuss some of the issues raised by the application including the wider potential of the approach and data requirements if such an approach were to be used in the future for National Accounts.

Journal article

Extra care housing: is it really an option for older people

Authors:
DAWSON Laura, WILLIAMS Jacqetta, NETTEN Ann
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 9(2), October 2006, pp.23-29.
Publisher:
Emerald

Extra care housing enables older people to remain in their 'own home', while providing appropriate housing and access to health and social care services that are responsive to their needs. This research explored the current levels of development and expansion of extra care housing in terms of the numbers of schemes and places and factors that contributed to and were problematic in its development.  A stratified sample of 16 authorities was selected from 148 local authorities in England which had social services responsibilities: 13 agreed to participate. Each authority completed a brief form indicating its level of provision, and the leads were interviewed over the telephone. An opportunistic sample of three registered landlords was also selected. The findings illustrate that local authorities and the Government were united in their aims for developing extra care housing. However, the baseline for provision in the authorities was very limited in comparison with the number of care home places. Good working partnership between social services and housing departments was seen as the most significant factor in the successful development of schemes.

Journal article

English local authority powers, responsibilities and guidelines for managing the care home closure process

Authors:
WILLIAMS Jacquette, NETTEN Ann
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 35(6), September 2005, pp.921-936.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

In England, the majority of older people living in care homes are publicly funded and the majority of publicly funded places are purchased from the independent sector. While the sector is subject to regulation, there is currently no statutory guidance aimed specifically at how care home closures are managed. This article reviews the powers and responsibilities of councils and the rights of residents during care home closures, before describing the prevalence and content of existing council guidelines. Just over a third of councils in England responded to inquiries and, of these, two-thirds reported having guidelines. This suggests that a considerable proportion of councils have no guidelines in place. Existing guidelines also varied. Differences included approaches to allocating responsibilities and providing help, and assessment to self-funding residents. The large number of arrangements and activities described suggest that some sort of plan or guidance is warranted to support the task of front line care managers. At the national level, the variation found in the guidelines combined with the lack of national guidance specific to closures suggests that clarification of councils’ legal responsibilities and powers during a care home closure is needed.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts