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Book

Respite services for the carers of confused elderly people; summary and conclusions

Authors:
MORIARTY Jo, LEVIN Enid, GORBACH Peter
Publisher:
National Institute for Social Work
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
18p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Summarises some of the key issues and findings contained in the report on respite services for carers.

Journal article

The future of social care

Author:
MORIARTY Jo
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dementia Care, 13(3), May 2005, pp.10-11.
Publisher:
Hawker

The author provides an overview of the proposals in the new green paper for adult social care that are especially relevant for people with dementia and their families. The article looks specifically at direct payments; the 'right to request' and greater involvement by the voluntary and community sectors.

Journal article

Falls prevention: access and acceptability to all?

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, MORIARTY Jo
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 21(2), 2017, pp.72-81.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the equalities' dimension of falls prevention services in light of the Equality Act 2010 and its protected characteristics. Research and policy are discussed in light of the Act and public services’ duties to be aware of their responsibilities. Design/methodology/approach: An initial research review was undertaken in 2012 and updated in 2016. Findings: The research on falls prevention services does not always collect data on users of the service and services do not always collect data about their users that would enable them to build a picture of their users in line with the Equality Act 2010. Practical implications: Services and commissioners will need to be able to show that the services funded by the public purse are accessible, acceptable and appropriate to the UK’s increasingly diverse older population. This paper describes some of the existing resources and research papers that contain elements of attention to the protected characteristics of the Equality Act 2010. Originality/value: This is an update on a research review undertaken in 2012. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The diversity of befriending by, and of, older people

Authors:
MORIARTY Jo, MANTHORPE Jill
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 21(2), 2017, pp.63-71.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: There is increasing interest in befriending services that aim to combat loneliness among older people. The purpose of this paper is to use the Equality Act 2010 as a framework for considering why older people might need these services and why some groups are over and under represented among service users. Design/methodology/approach: Databases, websites and other resources were searched systematically for material on befriending. The final review consisted of 80 items, ranging from research articles, reports, and toolkits. Findings: Individual face to face befriending has been the mainstay of the type of befriending support for older people. The increasing diversity of the older population and reductions in funding has led to adaptations of this model for different groups living in different circumstances. Research limitations/implications: The resources and time available to conduct the review were limited. It is possible that some relevant material was not identified. Practical implications: Practitioners working with older people need to know about befriending schemes available in their area and consider the reasons why some groups of older people might be reluctant to use them or require specialist schemes. Originality/value: Existing research on befriending rarely reports the demographic characteristics of those using the service in detail or considers why some groups of older people might have greater needs for befriending services or be reluctant to use them. The Equality Act 2010 provides a structured framework for considering diversity in access to, and use of, services. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

What do we know about care home managers? Findings of a scoping review

Authors:
ORELLANA Katharine, MANTHORPE Jill, MORIARTY Jo
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 25(2), 2017, pp.366-377.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article reports selected findings from a scoping review of the literature about care home managers in England. The review was undertaken between December 2013 and April 2014, with searches conducted in December 2013, and completed in July 2014. Its aim was to identify the characteristics of care home managers, descriptions of their leadership and managerial roles, their experience, skills and support, and the managers' perceptions of their work and status and to identify knowledge gaps. The databases searched included Web of Knowledge, EBSCO, ASSIA, Embase, AgeInfo, NHS Evidence, Social Care Online and the publication platforms IngentaConnect, Wiley Online and JSTOR together with specialist sites and national information providers. Sixteen relevant studies directly about care home managers, reported in 24 articles, were identified. A further body of literature pertinent to the questions was located (n = 84), including sector reports, professional press, expert opinion, enquiries and reviews, and other material, which also informed the review. A consultation exercise with stakeholders informed the findings of the review. The review found that, despite frequent allusions to their impact on organisational culture, few studies have focused on care home managers, and, such as there are, mainly relate to managers of care homes for older people. This is despite managers' major responsibilities for the care of many frail and disabled people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Handyperson schemes and the Equality Act 2010

Authors:
MORIARTY Jo, MANTHORPE Jill
Journal article citation:
Housing Care and Support, 16(3/4), 2013, pp.114-125.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore whether handyperson services are able to meet the needs of diverse groups of older people, specifically in the UK policy context, to meet the requirements of the Equality Act (2010). Design/methodology/approach: The scoping review of the literature was conducted in 2012 using a wide range of literature from the UK. Findings: In an under-researched field it is difficult for policy makers to determine whether handyperson schemes and their associated services are accessible to and being used by all sections of the older population. Schemes do not generally collect and report data about their users. Research limitations/implications: The scoping review concentrates on UK literature. There are a variety of handyperson schemes and they operate in different ways with different criteria and priorities. Some of the accounts of handyperson schemes provide little data about user characteristics. Practical implications – The paper suggests how handyperson schemes may be able to meet the requirements of the Equality Act (2010) by outlining what data are needed and approaches to gathering it sensitively and proportionally. Originality/value: The paper is the first to consider the implications of the Equality Act for handyperson schemes, which may be relevant to other housing and care services. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Diversity in older people and access to services: an evidence review

Authors:
MORIARTY Jo, MANTHORPE Jill
Publisher:
Age UK
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
97p.
Place of publication:
London

Age UK commissioned this literature review to provide information on equality and diversity issues relevant to older people living in the United Kingdom in relation to the following areas: falls prevention, home from hospital services, practical support at home (e.g. handyperson services), befriending, and day opportunities. The review was structured around the experiences of older people in terms of their protected characteristics, as defined in the Equality Act 2010 (age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion and belief, sex and sexual orientation). The findings are discussed in terms of need, access, outcomes, user experiences and user engagement. While some of the services discussed are associated with use of health and social care services, others relate to wider elements of wellbeing, such as home repairs and modification, or a community support service and befriending that have roots in the voluntary sector.  Many of the areas considered cross different sectors. The key conclusion of this scoping review is that, despite the longstanding nature of equalities legislation in terms of sex, race, and disability, the number of studies specifically designed to measure inequality in terms of these characteristics remains tiny.

Journal article

Housing or care workers? Who is supporting older people with high support needs?

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, MORIARTY Jo
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 19(1), February 2011, pp.16-25.
Publisher:
Emerald

Whilst there has been a considerable growth in extra care housing in the England, there is a lack of evidence about its potential and cost effectiveness. This article explores the workforce implications of this form of provision with a focus on older people with high support needs. The article first details what is meant by extra care housing, summarised as developments specially designed for older people offering self-contained accommodation alongside 24-hour care, and provided with a range of leisure activities and other shared facilities. The article then outlines what evidence is necessary to prove the benefits of such a housing model. Finally, the author presents a discussion on commissioning technology and telecare in these provisions, noting that such technology requires its own supporting workforce.

Journal article

Black and minority ethnic older people and mental well-being: possibilities for practice

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, MORIARTY Jo, STEVENS Martin, HUSSEIN Shereen, SHARIF Nadira
Journal article citation:
Working with Older People, 14(4), December 2010, pp.32-37.
Publisher:
Emerald

Drawing on findings from a practice enquiry, the authors discuss examples of arrangements and practice approaches which focus on mental well being of black and minority ethnic (BME) older people. The practice enquiry interviews over 80 practitioners, managers, older people and carers from four parts of the UK over 2009-2010. Practice from a range of different social care settings (including voluntary and community groups, sheltered housing, day care and care management) were covered. Respondents described and reflected on the support for older people from BME backgrounds, particularly focusing on how they might promote mental well-being. Practitioners emphasised the importance of talking to BME older people to determine what they wanted and what they might choose to support their mental well-being. They generally felt training was welcome but that it needed to recognise the local context and the reality of social care practice. Practitioners often lacked confidence in working with BME older people if they were not in areas where they are regular service users. Many of the practitioners were working in isolation without access to skilled support. Implications for practice are briefly discussed.

Journal article

Working with older people from black and minority ethnic groups who have depression

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, MORIARTY Jo
Journal article citation:
Quality in Ageing, 10(1), March 2009, pp.24-31.
Publisher:
Pier Professional
Place of publication:
Brighton

Despite the growing evidence base about depression and anxiety and its application to service settings and practice, there is still a shortage of practice examples about what works and for whom. This is particularly true of specialist groups, such as people from black and minority ethnic backgrounds. This article discusses policy and legislative encouragements to think about equality of access and diversity issues in mental health services and wider mental health promotion activities. It analyses recent research and policy documents in the context of demographic change and practice. It argues that the context of personalisation in England may provide new opportunities to consider what older people will find most acceptable and effective in meeting their needs, but notes the challenges that this will bring to community-based organisations and specialist services.

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