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Book

Elderly people - rights and opportunities

Author:
MANTHORPE Jill
Publisher:
Longman,|Age Concern
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
170p.
Place of publication:
Harlow
Journal article

'Third-age' workers caring for adults and older people in England: findings from secondary analysis of the National Minimum Data Set for Social Care

Authors:
HUSSEIN Shereen, MANTHORPE Jill
Journal article citation:
Diversity in Health and Care, 8(2), June 2011, pp.103-112.
Publisher:
Radcliffe Publishing

Even though the UK has implemented policies to combat the effects of age discrimination, ageism is still evident in the hiring, retention and career development opportunities of older workers. As such, this paper investigated the current stock of older workers in the adult social care sector in England. Data was drawn from the National Minimum Data Set for Social Care, and included 80,000 samples of workers. The paper examined the changing profile of three closely related third-age cohorts and investigate the similarities and differences between those working in the care sector aged 60 years or older, and two younger age groups, namely 50-54 and 55-59 years. Analysis revealed that workers in the age range 50-75 years constitute nearly 40% of the whole workforce. In particular, the impact of the oldest third-age group, aged 60-75 years, is substantial, contributing to around 12% of the total. The implications of this diversity are explored.

Journal article

Smarter working in social and health care: professional perspectives on a new technology for risk appraisal with older people

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 40(6), September 2010, pp.1829-1846.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Health Risk Appraisal for Older People (HRAO) is a self-assessment information technology system for promoting health and well-being in later life. This technology permits the profiling of individuals’ self-reported health, activities and lifestyle, and tailors advice to them about how best to improve their health. The paper reports on the Smarter Working in Social Sare & Health (SWISH) study, which explored the potential for incorporating social dimensions that may impact negatively on health and well-being into HRAO, and considers its potential use by social work authorities and practitioners. The study took place in two London local authorities in 2005 to 2007. A multi-method approach consolidated findings from focus groups and interviews with older people and professionals. The objectives were: to refine a method to improve access to information and services, and to identify older people at risk; and to examine the potential of the method to enrich public sector information and to profile local populations to inform local commissioners. Under the first objective, views were mixed. The existing health risk assessment tool was seen as comprehensive, with the capacity to identify low-level risks to well-being, although possibly burdensome. Under the second objective, social workers and managers were uncertain how to make use of local population data and to the capacity of local resources to meet information needs. The article concludes with messages for practitioners and managers.

Journal article

Rural dimensions of elder abuse: contributions to the No Secrets review from rural older people

Authors:
CORNES Michelle, MANTHORPE Jill, HASELDEN Noreen
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adult Protection, 12(3), August 2010, pp.20-29.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper explores elder abuse in rural communities. As part of the consultation around the review of the guidance document 'No Secrets', published by the Department of Health in 2008, a project was commissioned to listen to the views and experiences of a group of older people living in a rural community in Lancashire and Cumbria. The participants were 15 members of a County Forum for the Older Person who were divided into 2 focus groups. The groups discussed questions taken from the 'Keeping People Safe – Tell us how we can help' booklet and some case vignettes. This article reports on the findings of the consultation process and lessons for the review. These largely support the literature in confirming the variety of experiences and views held by rural older people, their personal activity related to protection of themselves and their sense of heightened vulnerabilities but also security from living in rural areas.

Journal article

Ageing cities: public health approaches to creating a mentally healthy London for older citizens

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Public Mental Health, 8(3), September 2009, pp.20-27.
Publisher:
Emerald

At a time of increasing interest in mental health in later life, the role of public health approaches is potentially heightened. This paper draws on interview data with older people living in London to consider the interplay between personal and public approaches to health and well-being. The interviews were under taken as part of the midpoint review of the UK government's 10-year strategy for older people (Healthcare Commission et al, 2006) and the social characteristics of London are considered.

Journal article

Purchasing power: getting the best for older people

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, November 2008, pp.26-29.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The authors discuss some of the challenges facing commissioners who are purchasing mental health services for older people. They briefly highlight some of the main complexities which include: the complexity of older people's identities; the make up of workforces; the difficult nature of work with older people; and the multiple agencies involved in working with older people. It is argued that consistent application of a long-term strategy, which allows the accumulation of small changes across agencies and disciplines, is likely to be the key to success. It sets out the issues that need to be addressed, the pitfalls to avoid, and examines a series of objectives for commissioners.

Journal article

The mental health of older people: taking a long view

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, ILIFFE Steve
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 16(5), October 2008, pp.4-13.
Publisher:
Emerald

This article sets out some of the challenges facing commissioners of mental health services for older people, and uses recommendations from a recent inquiry to outline possible commissioning objectives.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Rural areas and personalisation

Author:
MANTHORPE Jill
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 23.10.08, 2008, p.34, 36.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Findings from a recent study to investigate how individual budgets have fared in country areas are summarised. The study sought the views of lead officers, mainly social service managers, from rural local authorities where individual budgets (IBs) were piloted. It also included the views of providers and service users in rural areas of England. The results highlight the importance of the local context of personalisation, and the need to consider specific rural issues.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Lifting the depression

Author:
MANTHORPE Jill
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 11.05.07, 2007, pp.42-43,45.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The author examines a review of studies on suicide and older people, and draws out the implications for practitioners.

Journal article

Intermediate care: older people's involvement and experiences

Authors:
MANTHORPE Jill, CORNES Michelle
Journal article citation:
Journal of Integrated Care, 12(6), December 2004, pp.43-48.
Publisher:
Emerald

New service models such as intermediate care may find it difficult to involve older people in services that are time-limited and unfamiliar. Their staff may perceive themselves as having little time to sustain or build relationships with voluntary and community-based organisations engaged in intermediate care. This article shows how such challenges can be met by drawing on the experiences of voluntary sector projects involved in intermediate care services. The article focuses on practitioners' experiences of involving older people in intermediate care assessment and treatment and, secondly on the views of older people about the information they received.

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