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Supporting older people in care homes at night

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

Key points are presented from a study that explored the night-time care experiences of residents, relatives and staff in three care homes in Scotland. The study identified good practice and suggested improvements through a series of interventions. These are used to make recommendations for care regulators, commissioners and providers, home managers and night-time care staff.

Book Full text available online for free

Using 'Talking Mats' to help people with dementia to communicate

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

The deterioration of communication between people with dementia and their carers is one of the most distressing aspects of the illness. This project aimed to establish whether Talking Mats a low-tech communication framework, help people with dementia to communicate, and to examine how effective they are for people at different stages of dementia.

Book Full text available online for free

The material resources and well-being of older people

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

Older people with low levels of material resources were over-represented by women, those living alone, people who are widowed, divorced or separated, in poor health, with lower education and living in deprived neighbourhoods. Although older respondents (for example, those over 75 years) had fewer material resources than others they tended to be satisfied with their financial situation. This may represent adaptation to a financial situation that may not easily be changed, but did not indicate that they were receiving an income that adequately meets their financial needs. In other words, many older households may have been putting on a happy face in order to cope with the inescapable reality of everyday life. Material resources were partially determined by being employed but this was not important for financial well-being (satisfaction with resources). Material resources were partially determined by having an occupational pension but this was less important to financial well-being. A private source of income, including from a business, rent, interest and insurance payments, was a dimension of material resources and had a positive influence on financial satisfaction. Low levels of material resources had a negative impact on the life satisfaction of older people.

Book Full text available online for free

Attitudes to inheritance in Britain

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

With more families owning their own homes, more people will both bequeath and inherit assets. A key issue that this raises for social policy is whether people maintain their assets to leave as bequests (potentially raising the living standards of their children) or use them in later life to improve their own living standards. Almost half (46 per cent) of adults have inherited something. Most inheritances involve relatively small amounts; but 5 per cent of people have inherited £50,000 or more. Professional white owner-occupiers are most likely to receive an inheritance. The researchers conclude that inheritance plays an important part in many people’s lives but has not generally become entrenched as an expectation or duty. Most older people are willing to use their assets for themselves, rationally using some of their lifetime assets to meet needs in later life.

Book Full text available online for free

Implementing direct payments

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

The Community Care (Direct Payments) Act 1996 introduced direct payments, allowing some disabled people to purchase the provision of their own support. In 1997, a pilot project was established in Norfolk, to consider the implementation of direct payments in a largely rural county. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation supported the pilot scheme by funding a researcher to assist with an evaluation of the project.

Book

The impact of European union law on pensions in the UK: findings

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

European Union (EU) activity in relation to occupational and state pensions is increasing. Much is directed towards creating the single market and avoiding distortions in competition. The possibility that this market-oriented activity has an adverse effect on the ability of pensions to provide adequate income is seldom addressed in the UK. This new study by the authors brings together the diverse strands of EU pension-related activity and finds it has had both beneficial and adverse effects an occupational and state pensions in the UK.

Book Full text available online for free

Comparing models of housing with care for later life

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

Interest is growing in the role of housing schemes for older people that combine independent living with relatively high levels of care. This comparative study of seven schemes in England examines different models of housing with care for older people.

Book Full text available online for free

Involving Chinese older people in policy and practice

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

This study, by a research team from the University of Sheffield, was an action-orientated and participant-focused project that aimed to enable Chinese older people to influence policy and practice. It also allowed them to reflect on their experiences of involvement. The study found that: Participants had diverse experiences of involvement, both in their own community and in the wider society. Many took part in voluntary work, voted in local and general elections, served as members of management committees in Chinese organisations and attended consultation events organised by local authorities.  Those who took part shared common issues about getting involved, including the language barrier, lack of support, lack of leadership and limited level of involvement. There were positives and negatives about getting involved. Participants gained a sense of achievement and an increase in self-confidence, friendship and respect. Sometimes, their involvement brought about practical changes in services and improvement in the lives of Chinese older people. However, they also invested a lot of time, money and energy and involvement could also bring stress and anxiety. There was a mix of personal reasons and social reasons for Chinese older people to get involved. Some participants said they wanted to combat their own or others’ social isolation, and to develop services which could benefit themselves and later generations. Others took part because of invitations from friends or the feeling of being respected and valued. Participants drew up a statement of shared expectations on growing old. This covered provision of Chinese community centres, medical and health services, emergency support, appropriate care, suitable housing, social contacts, lifelong learning and citizen rights.

Book Full text available online for free

Making the case for retirement villages

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

There has been a growing policy emphasis on promoting independence for older people, offering them choices, and improving their quality of life.  Retirement villages appear to serve current policy agendas very well.  They offer purposefully designed barrier-free housing with its associated autonomy, a range of facilities and activities that are not care related which generate opportunities for informal and formal social activity and engagement, alongside a range of care and support services that can respond quickly and flexibly to a range of care needs over time.

Book Full text available online for free

Options for financing private long-term care

Author:
JOSEPH ROWNTREE FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
York

Long-term care provision in the United Kingdom has been the subject of much debate and analysis over the past decade, yet the issue of how to fund the cost of that care for future generations remains unresolved. Much of the debate has revolved around how the State should address the problem. As a consequence, the general public are unsure as to where their responsibilities and liabilities lie. There is a perceived unfairness around the current system which leaves significant financial responsibility resting with the individual above basic income and asset levels. Insurance plans designed to cater for the cost of care in later life have not been popular. As a result, most insurers have now withdrawn from this market.Investment-based plans have failed to maintain protection levels and have now also been withdrawn from the market. Annuities specially designed to fund care fees and which recognise reduced life expectancy do provide a solution for some, but access to advice at a time of crisis may be difficult. Equity release or lifetime mortgages are popular but are not being used as a way to fund care. The current pensions ‘crisis’ bears many of the same hallmarks as those relating to long-term care planning. As with the Pensions Commission Report, there does not appear to be one single solution to the problems surrounding long-term care. A combination of measures may be more likely to succeed.

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